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You are most likely drawing more than 100 watts of power. According to Acer, the Predator Helios 300 comes with either a 135 watt or 180 watt power supply, depending on model. The airplane outlet is likely correct in detecting a current overdraw and shutting down. In my experience, the outlet limiters on planes are overzealous and will shut down draws as low ...


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From personal experience on many flights: it's probably an inrush current issue, but repeatedly unplugging and replugging often keeps the mysterious green light on. Plugging in with the lid closed, then opening the lid often helps.


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Surprisingly, [the green light on the airplane socket goes off] when I plug the charger alone without the laptop at the other end. This means the actual power consumption has nothing to do with it, it's purely the inrush current phenomenon. Your laptop has a beefy capacitor near the input which is supposed to store enough energy for the laptop to stay ...


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This alone explains it all: it also happens when I plug the charger alone without the laptop at the other end. Because of the way power supplies are constructed, they draw extremely short, but very large "inrush" current. This can sometimes even visually manifest itself as a tiny spark when plugging it in. The PSU doesn't even need to be turned on, it's ...


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There is actually a technical solution, but you may not be able to apply it. I include it for completeness anyway. Negative Temperature Coefficient resisitors are used to limit inrush current. However fitting one would mean customising mains-powered equipment, which you probably aren't qualified to do: either modifying the power supply or building a short ...


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I had this problem a few years ago with my MacbookPro. This was using a grounded Australian plug. Strangely, when I connected a European (or maybe it was US) plug adapter (not a transformer), it worked OK. My guess was either the Australian plugs were not making good contact, or it was some sort of ground protection kicking in, which the non-grounded ...


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Overcurrent isn't the only reason for an airline circuit to trip. It might also be looking for ground faults/residual current (GFCI/RCD) or listening for arc faults (AFCI). Any appliance can have either problem. Trains are electric beasts - even a diesel train has the diesel engine driving a giant electric generator on the order of 3 million watts (with ...


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You can try finding a compatible charger that supplies fewer watts, say 60 or 80 watts. The effect would be that your battery might discharge slowly while you use your computer (much slower than if you are not using any charger) and it recharges more slowly when the laptop gets turned off, but hopefully it gets you round the problem you have. If you do ...


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Unfortunately there is no negotiation mechanism between a mains outlet and your laptop. So your laptop has no idea that it needs to limit its current draw. I would not take the "100W max" label on the sockets on the train as meaning much. AFAICT sockets on planes typically have local protection (the green light that goes out), while sockets on trains are ...


0

You are tripping because you draw too much current. Current is very time varying phenomena and the typical specs are not very useful. If it happens when you plug in the charger without the laptop, it's probably tripping on the inrush current that's charging the storage capacitor in the power supply. You could try the following approach: disconnect the ...


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I had a laptop that drew too much power for the socket. So I didn't plug it in and use it at the same time. I used it on battery, then when I wasn't using it (eg during meals) I closed the lid and plugged it in. This reduced the draw enough to keep the breaker from flipping. This may not make any and all laptops work with finicky power supplies on planes, ...


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When you power your laptop on, you're likely drawing the peak 180W. That may be causing issues with not just the circuit breaker, but any surge suppression or arc-fault detectors as well. While this is for Virgin Atlantic circa 2010, I can't see them being too terribly different from other airlines flying planes today Each pair of outlets at every row of ...


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If a socket says "100 W max", it doesn't mean, that your laptop would be drawing less. Your laptop/charger will draw what it needs. The socket will provide the power that your laptop needs, until it reaches the rating of the circuit breaker, and it will trip (as you have experienced). Also, as the 2 comments already have mentioned, a load peak can always ...


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Uruguay uses 220V at 50Hz mains power supply similarly to European countries. The plugs are mostly type F, commonly known as Schuko: Or type C, commonly known as Europlugs: Coming from France, this means that in most cases you will not need an adaptor. However, you might find other types of sockets - type I and type L - for which an adaptor is required. ...


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