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3

Earthing (grounding) is covered in the other answers but the other thing you should make sure of is that there isn't too much mechanical stress on the adapters or on the socket that you're using, as that could lead to a poor contact which could overheat. If the socket is trailing (e.g. on the end of an extension lead) you can lie it down so the MacBook ...


8

In the specific case of a MacBook, it's safe: the MacBook power supply is non-grounded. The grounding pin on your UK "type G" plug is probably a plastic dummy pin, so going from a UK "type G" to a Colombian three-pin "type B" to a Peruvian two-pin "type A" or "type C" doesn't lose the ground connection. If, on the other hand, you're using a device that ...


26

Yes, it's generally safe. Adapters don't have any active components, so assuming they're all rated for the voltage/amps you're putting through, there's little risk of overload etc like there is with transformers. The main catch is that if you plug a three-pin plug into a series of adapters that "loses" the third pin, your device will no longer be grounded. ...


0

No, the plugs are all AED type. They don't have universal plugs. You need converters.


0

Look at the device. If it says 120-240V, you're all set It may say a wider range like 100-240V (or 90-264V which is that +/-10%). 100V comes from Japan, if you're wondering. Your Apple branded chargers will all be multi-voltage. Third party chargers may vary, but in all probability, they're multi-voltage too because of the magic of switching power ...


1

1) For your MacBook adapter: you need neither. Just simply buy a UK duckhead for your MacBook, already. Either: the outrageously overpriced official "Apple World Travel Adapter set" (which is just five outrageously overpriced duckheads in a box), or (unofficial third-party) individual duckheads (you can't find these on Amazon, only on eBay, for (cough, ...


21

Almost certainly, each AC to DC converter you have will support both UK and US voltages, and you do not need a voltage converter. To be absolutely sure, look at the back of your laptop's charger and your AC-to-USB plug. There should be a label that, among other things, specifies supported input voltages and AC frequencies. If it says something like "100-...


3

The Apple website states: You should use the appropriate wattage power adapter for your Mac notebook. You can use a compatible higher wattage adapter without issue, but it won't make your computer charge faster or operate differently. Lower wattage adapters don't provide enough power. The adapters are rated at a higher voltage and should be fine.


1

Having used the same kind of adapter for the same kind of plug, I assume there is something wrong with the actual adapter. That might be the fuse (which is mentioned on the face of it visible in the photo) or some of the wiring inside. (The fuse is also mentioned in one of the other answers.) As you bought it in a hotel to use in that hotel, I would go ...


0

So this does not go answered the plug on the left which we are all assuming is the OP's charger is a common type in some other countries in Europe (hence the tag EU) and adapters to use it in the UK (question tagged UK) look absolutely nothing like the one shown which is for visitors from elsewhere. They would usually have two holes positioned to accept the ...


6

As the photo shows it's fused. The fuse might be blown. It happened to me before with these adapters, almost none of them adhere to the relevant standards so problems are expected (the adapter on the photo accepts a US and an Australian plug besides the EU plug you have, there is no standard allowing for that). The other possibility the socket doesn't have ...


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