New answers tagged

-1

First of all, airlines to their utmost best to ensure that they do not have passengers who need visa but do not have them. If an airline notice you do not have a needed visa before you enter the plane, they might not transport you at all, or if it is because the travel is re-routed, they might re-route you again, so you are not in the plane. But if a plane ...


2

To be continuously edited The non-EU/EFTA countries offering EC261 compensation are: Georgia (SOURCE) Moldova (SOURCE) Serbia (SOURCE) Turkey (SOURCE) Ukraine (SOURCE)


6

Maybe; AFAIK, It is a pilot strike then there is a big chance that the plane will be grounded. "... They plan a 48-hour strike from 00:01 on 22 August until 23.59 on 23 August, and a 72-hour strike from 00:01 on 2 September until 23.59 on 4 September..." "It’s highly likely though that some flights will not take off, and passengers who have booked flights, ...


0

You are most likely drawing more than 100 watts of power. According to Acer, the Predator Helios 300 comes with either a 135 watt or 180 watt power supply, depending on model. The airplane outlet is likely correct in detecting a current overdraw and shutting down. In my experience, the outlet limiters on planes are overzealous and will shut down draws as low ...


1

Row 11 has extra legroom because it's in an exit row, but it is very likely that Row 11 seats will not recline, as doing so would impinge the room in the exit row behind. If you know the Airline and flight number, you can enter that information in seatguru.com, which will display comments about each seat on the aircraft.


1

From personal experience on many flights: it's probably an inrush current issue, but repeatedly unplugging and replugging often keeps the mysterious green light on. Plugging in with the lid closed, then opening the lid often helps.


2

Swede's have the option to use the website Flygresor.se which can include the surcharge for a checked bag and also for climate compensation and payment method. The site only searches prices through Swedish travel agencies, not directly with the carriers. Because of this prices are only available in SEK and support is very limited. The airline selection ...


6

Surprisingly, [the green light on the airplane socket goes off] when I plug the charger alone without the laptop at the other end. This means the actual power consumption has nothing to do with it, it's purely the inrush current phenomenon. Your laptop has a beefy capacitor near the input which is supposed to store enough energy for the laptop to stay ...


7

I book flights regularily and actually keep a list of hidden charges for the sites that come up near the top of any search regularily. Then, when I make a new search and see the prices listed, I simply add the hidden charges I know about in my head. Typically, the offers are close enough together that the hidden charges actually do make a difference. It's a ...


39

This alone explains it all: it also happens when I plug the charger alone without the laptop at the other end. Because of the way power supplies are constructed, they draw extremely short, but very large "inrush" current. This can sometimes even visually manifest itself as a tiny spark when plugging it in. The PSU doesn't even need to be turned on, it's ...


2

There is actually a technical solution, but you may not be able to apply it. I include it for completeness anyway. Negative Temperature Coefficient resisitors are used to limit inrush current. However fitting one would mean customising mains-powered equipment, which you probably aren't qualified to do: either modifying the power supply or building a short ...


1

I had this problem a few years ago with my MacbookPro. This was using a grounded Australian plug. Strangely, when I connected a European (or maybe it was US) plug adapter (not a transformer), it worked OK. My guess was either the Australian plugs were not making good contact, or it was some sort of ground protection kicking in, which the non-grounded ...


10

For Aussies such as yourself, my site - Beat That Flight (and beta Android app) might be able to help a bit. For example, on a search from Sydney to Hong Kong - on the left side, you can see baggage options, with the perceived difference in price: It's not perfect, and relies on data on upstream providers as well, but makes an effort to try and calculate ...


7

Kayak is not my first choice of search engines, but I do note that it now attempts to factor carry-ons and checked bags into the price. You have to start the search and then change the zero bags default in the filters. Kiwi.com (which I also am not thrilled with) will tell you which flights allow NO bags, which isn't a great help, but it's something. ...


68

Overcurrent isn't the only reason for an airline circuit to trip. It might also be looking for ground faults/residual current (GFCI/RCD) or listening for arc faults (AFCI). Any appliance can have either problem. Trains are electric beasts - even a diesel train has the diesel engine driving a giant electric generator on the order of 3 million watts (with ...


7

You can try finding a compatible charger that supplies fewer watts, say 60 or 80 watts. The effect would be that your battery might discharge slowly while you use your computer (much slower than if you are not using any charger) and it recharges more slowly when the laptop gets turned off, but hopefully it gets you round the problem you have. If you do ...


2

It would not be required for a plane trip. If that would be the case then many people wouldn't be able to fly... Since this is a company trip then maybe the standard paperwork for trips asks for your drivers license number in the case you need a company/rental car one day.


10

Unfortunately there is no negotiation mechanism between a mains outlet and your laptop. So your laptop has no idea that it needs to limit its current draw. I would not take the "100W max" label on the sockets on the train as meaning much. AFAICT sockets on planes typically have local protection (the green light that goes out), while sockets on trains are ...


15

I had a laptop that drew too much power for the socket. So I didn't plug it in and use it at the same time. I used it on battery, then when I wasn't using it (eg during meals) I closed the lid and plugged it in. This reduced the draw enough to keep the breaker from flipping. This may not make any and all laptops work with finicky power supplies on planes, ...


7

When you power your laptop on, you're likely drawing the peak 180W. That may be causing issues with not just the circuit breaker, but any surge suppression or arc-fault detectors as well. While this is for Virgin Atlantic circa 2010, I can't see them being too terribly different from other airlines flying planes today Each pair of outlets at every row of ...


45

If a socket says "100 W max", it doesn't mean, that your laptop would be drawing less. Your laptop/charger will draw what it needs. The socket will provide the power that your laptop needs, until it reaches the rating of the circuit breaker, and it will trip (as you have experienced). Also, as the 2 comments already have mentioned, a load peak can always ...


1

When talking flight software you have to know Amadeus has a monopoly. Amadeus has an extensive guide on how to add SSR (Special Service Request) rows. Amadeus also provides a list of defined SSR codes. Using the SSR Code List we can see that CKIN is used for "Information for airport personnel". B2 and PS are the airline codes. HK1 is confirmed However ...


10

It depends a lot on the airport and the individual screener. The TSA itself is fairly inconsistent in applying their own rules and very ineffective at detecting actual weapons etc. I've certainly had engagements with security employees that obviously didn't know their own rules or just made them up on the fly. Just two weeks ago I get yelled at because I ...


3

passengers who are not checked in before the check-in counter closes prematurely, would be treated as no-shows This is not legally possible. When your long-haul flight is delayed or cancelled and you arrived on time, you're entitled to either a refund or an alternative flight + care and assistance while you wait for it. This is in addition to compensation ...


8

This situation is currently under dispute in The Netherlands. In September 2018, Ryanair cancelled many European flights due to strikes by their pilots and cabin crew. It denied compensation to customers claiming 'extraordinary circumstances'. Dutch Transport ministry inspectors decided not to fine Ryanair for this and that the matter is up to civil courts ...


3

I'm sitting at YYZ right now, and managed to scout out a (relatively) not-busy part of T1 to measure the sizers. Almost every sizer is of the old type: composed of metal tubing welded together to form a frame. I also saw a few new sizers that are powder coated black sheet metal, and look much less forgiving. Here's what I found: Common Style These sizers ...


3

It's pretty standard for most airlines to offer layovers up to 24 hours, and up to 4 hours domestically. This is another case where the power of ITA Matrix (https://matrix.itasoftware.com) comes really handy! In ITA Matrix, you can search for flights with a connection above a minimum length. Usually, if you search for connections longer than 12 hours, that'...


3

As others have noted, it might make sense going North/South. I recently travelled from Johannesburg to Bucharest via Israel. I think it probably was a relatively cheap way to make the trip - first leg with El Al, second leg with Wizz Air - but I wouldn't necessarily recommend it: El Al is pretty bad, and it was a pain to 1) get subjected to 40 min ...


23

While it may be hard to say for certain without going through the court system, "political unrest" seems to be generally considered an "extraordinary circumstance" for the purpose of EU delay compensation. For example, the UK Civil Aviation Authority's "Am I entitled to compensation" page, under "Examples of extraordinary circumstances," includes "political ...


8

Searching for flights with stopovers (the term used to describe a long layover, usually over 24 hours, where you retrieve your bags and check them back in when you depart) is not an easy task. Airline policies are very variable in this respect. Some airlines do encourage stopovers in their "home city", pushed to do so by local authorities. They will often ...


0

Airlines websites usually doesn't show all options (they took several years to allow multi-segment flights). Try external website, where you can filter out easily too short connections (e.g. kayak), or just check the possible flights on different days (and check how many days you can do a stopover), then contact the airline. Unfortunately, in such way, it ...


5

I have flown with many duffel bags as hold luggage and I have never had a problem with the handles. The warning you quote refers mostly to big rucksacks which have thick loose shoulder straps, and maybe even chest and waist straps. Having said this, if you want to be extra careful with your luggage there are a few options you can consider: Get a rucksack ...


0

You have 4 options getting from Akureyri to Reykjavík. Domestic plane You can fly directly to the Keflavík Airport, or to the Reykjavík domestic airport depending on the time of the day. Time is 45 minutes. Busses There are busses for you to take. They make stops at gas station/restaurants every now and then. It will take about 6 hours, the same as with ...


1

For the flights, as I understand it as long as the overland leg is shorter than the flown legs and the flown legs are on compatible airlines it's normally possible for the two legs of such a trip to be booked on the same ticket with each leg being priced at "half return" pricing. Google flights offers a "multi-city" option that can be used to look for such ...


9

Most of the large international airports outside of North America provide sterile international-to-international transit which does not require passengers to go through passport control or customs or to reclaim and re-check bags. This especially applies to airports which are a major hub for one or more airlines doing a lot of long-haul. Here are a few ...


2

The overstay and the ban you got for it, or would have gotten if you had tried to enter again, is for you, not for the passport you have or even the name you used. But after 11 years the actual ban is likely to be over and it should not give you problems on entering the USA. Having had to overstay in the past may make entry into the USA harder, as there is ...


4

This depends on the airline for example Xiamen Air in China do not count foldable luggage carts as extra carry on and happily lets it come in board without issues. However I tried the same on Air China and had to check it. So best check the rules on the airline in question


2

No, there is no paid access for Krisflyer Gold lounges. See also: Access to Star Alliance Gold lounges at Singapore with children


4

If you fly on one ticket, as you said you do, you will be booked on the first available flight if you miss your connection, assuming you have done your best to get there in time. Best contact the airline (one of the cabin crew will do) before landing how to handle the transfer, so you know what is the recommended way to handle the transfer. Check whether ...


2

I've seen this happen many times when flying from China to America. The thing is, airplanes don't actually care how far away the destination is, but rather they care about the flying time. When you are flying against the wind (as you generally are when heading west in the northern hemisphere) your best bet is the shortest route, hence flights heading west ...


2

From the airport's website: The 2 terminals are in fact two separate airports 5km one from other If you have a flight connection landing in T2 and departing from T1, take in mind that the transfer process will take 2-3 hours Domestic Terminal is busiest during the day while International Terminal is busiest during night Is not allowed to check in ...


5

The airline has given you 48 hours notice, and offered you a complete refund if you didn't want to fly to Gatwick. I imagine they might have also been willing to rebook you on a flight 24 hours later. You could have rebooked on a different flight, that day or another day. You didn't take them up on their offer so they feel, reasonably, I suggest, that you ...


2

There are luggage carts which run on two wheels and have a waist strap. It is hard to find them online, only one for sale (as far as I found them) and that one is not for sale yet. But I have seen earlier versions in the past, so long ago that google can not find the photos from the few details I remember. You can also buy a shopping trolley or the right ...


0

Besides the other reasons given, if there's a problem and the airline has to put you on another flight then it's a lot better for them if they only have to get you to Tokyo rather than having to specifically go though Moscow. With one you are buying London to Tokyo, probably stopping in Moscow along the way but maybe not. With the other you are buying ...


7

I've had success just asking at the check-in counter. They gave me a "boarding pass to nowhere" (looks like a boarding pass but I can't actually use it to get on a plane) which I then showed to the TSA agents. I imagine they have discretion, and this might vary by airport (mine was in Seattle), so you might want to call the airline ahead of time to make sure....


3

You should careful pack the oil, some airlines requires double layer. 3-4 liters should be OK for Germany, if you import just oil (ev. with few other cheap items). The only airline I know that has restrictions on olive oil is Aeroflots, and only on flights from Greece to Russia (no such restriction on oil on other flights).


49

The specific answer concerning your flight is that yesterday there were abnormally fast westerly winds over the mid-north-Atlantic, which many eastbound flights took advantage of. You can still see them, as of the time of this edit, here: https://www.ventusky.com/?p=43.5;-32.4;3&l=temperature-200hpa (shown are winds at a pressure altitude of 12000m, ...


10

In short, your flight followed what is known as a "North Atlantic Track". These are paths in the air above the North Atlantic which are used by air traffic control to effectively manage aircraft separation in the North Atlantic (where there are lots of planes and little radar coverage). Planes' entry into these tracks is managed for safety reasons and ...


12

Is there a reason for this? It's a complicated supply and demand equation. Usually, a major factor is that: The direct flights are a premium product. Of the people in London wanting to get to Moscow (or the people in Moscow wanting to get to Tokyo), the ones with the deepest pockets, most urgency or most flexible expense accounts will favour the direct ...


-4

Because with the two separate tickets, they will need to do the following as extra work: Unload your luggage to where you will pick it up a. there is also a chance that your luggage will be lost/delayed and they will need to reimburse/ship it to your residence - this risk is doubled for two separate flights (from their POV/system - you physically only have ...


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