New answers tagged

-2

Personally I would avoid flying over US airspace at all costs. All it takes, is for the flight you're on to land in the US for whatever reason and your then in trouble. Trust me, I've been deported from the US to Canada (Canadian Citizen) and tried flying to Mexico, and was detained. Follow the advice from John M, it'll be money well spent!


1

(Threaten to) take them to small claims court In most countries taking someone to small claims court is faily cheap and straight forward, and doesn't require a lawyer. That's basically its whole point, to let people recovour money they are owes where the cost of a laywer would be a decent portion of what they are trying to recover. I am not a lawyer, but if ...


6

For US Visa puporses, it looks like you need to use your single name as "last name" and FNU as first name. FNU means "first name unknow". See https://in.usembassy.gov/visas/nonimmigrant-visas/ FAQ section. It's likely that United will adopt the same process since they need to communicate booking data and Visa data to US immigration ...


4

Is this possible? Sure. The question is how much LH will charge you for the change. There is always two parts to a change: change fee plus the price difference between the new on and the old ticket. The change fee may be waived but that depends a lot on the specific ticket that you bought and the associated fine print. In your case that seems to be a no-go ...


8

As Harper - Reinstate Monica stated, most countries, and the countries of the Schengen Area are no exception, don't want you to use tourist/visitor visas to effectively live in a country through repeated visits. The rule of thumb usually applied is that you shouldn't be in the country (or area, in the case of Schengen) more than half of the time. If you're ...


2

Immigration has a rule of thumb that on a visitor visa, you are not to effectively live in a country via repeated visits. Given your affinity for the place, you should consider arranging a situation that would involve a non-visitor visa, such as getting hired in to a Benelux country.


22

I recall someone saying that you can't go to the same Schengen country as a tourist for 3 months over and over even if you don't overstay a trip, because immigration thinks that it's suspicious for some reason. They might find it suspicious, but it's not against the rules, and if they look at you more closely because of their suspicion, they ought not to ...


8

No, in order to enter Mexico or the US by air, both you and your child will need a passport. If you are US citizens, you may be able to get a passport in a hurry at the San Diego Passport Agency; be sure to follow all the instructions on their page regarding appointment scheduling and necessary documentation for both you and your child. If you are Mexican ...


9

So I wonder whether it would be possible to travel from transit zone to transit zone, No. When boarding a flight from A to B, the airline MUST check whether you meet immigration and Covid requirements for your destination country and will decline boarding if you can't show these. If you have a "good" passport you may be able to get away with the ...


13

While the concept is interesting, it is unlikely except perhaps in very limited cases. The issue is that it is difficult to prevent you from leaving an airport. So, when boarding, you would have to meet the requirements of the destination country of your ticket. Simply telling the agent that you don't intend to leave will not make them waive pre-boarding ...


4

This is not practical because many airlines will check if you have the right to enter your destination country. In theory you could book the entire trip before leaving, and claim that your destination country is the same as your home country, but your question was about booking onward travel when already partway through the journey.


2

You should probably call to ensure the booking, as others have said since you know in advance that this is what you want. But I have successfully (online) changed one leg of a round-trip (outgoing in this case) to match another person's; they were different dates on both legs of both tickets, and I first changed mine to be the same date & time (and ...


5

You will have to do that by your own, there’s no way to book it as one transaction on any website. But it should be no problem to book them in sequence - one round-trip, and then a single trip on the same flight. When checking in, you can either try to catch a seat next to each other by paying for the seat, or ask the agent at the check-in desk to seat you ...


12

Two single tickets will almost always be more expensive than a return, unless you book a very flexible return which is going to be much more expensive that the cheap fares. Actually, in some cases, it can be cheaper to buy a return ticket than a one-way ticket! Remember that you must use the first (“outbound”) flight even if you ditch the second one (“...


8

Sometimes its just a marketing trick. Some airlines simply combine two arbitrary routes through a hub, give it the same flight number and the market it as a "direct flight" from A to B. Example: I booked a "direct flight" on United from Boston to Vegas and it turns out it had a stop in Denver. It was NOT the same plane, NOT the same crew, ...


3

There are a finite number of flight designations, particularly as the legacy systems behind a good deal of scheduling and reservations are limited to a two-character airline code and a four-digit flight code (XX0000). Over the last two decades there has been an extraordinary expansion of codeshare agreements, not just for regional carriers, but through inter-...


7

Others have addressed the question from the point of view of whether you can (technically), and whether you can (legally), use your satellite phone during your flight. However there is one other aspect you should consider, and that is whether you should use your satellite phone during your flight. I, and I think many others, see such travel time as an ...


28

Technical Aspects The key part of the quote about pilots leaving the sat phone on the dash is the 'dash' part. The dash is under a glass surface, which is almost completely transparent to RF signals and has a nice, wide view of the sky, where the satellites are. This will not translate well to the cabin, where the fuselage is not made of glass and is ...


5

Of course not. Radio transmitters/receivers are specifically forbidden UNLESS a specific device on the exception list (mainly phones & tablets). I can't count the number of times I've heard "everything with a transmit or receive function must be turned off" The airline is likely to enforce this, since they want to make money out of you using ...


6

Both your quotes only address the technical aspect of it, and make it clear you need to be in a position where the signal from the satellites is not obstructed by the structure of the plane, which is nearly impossible in most planes. A window seat is unlikely to make much of a difference. On most planes, windows are small, often very badly placed (quite low),...


1

While this only applies to browser activities, one way to find out what in-flight internet will feel like is to simulate it with Google Chrome or a Chromium-based browser. If you hit F12 in Chrome or a related browser, you'll get the Developer Tools. These include a Network tab. On that tab, there's a dropdown that initially says "No throttling". ...


1

While other focus on what may be wrong with the connection, I would take the opposite approach. Assume the best case scenario (given the parameters of your trip) and then try to figure out what that scenario looks like. Needless to say that you can follow these steps when you are still considering different airlines and routes. I'd propose a simple checklist ...


4

I would say that not only is this information not well defined, I would also posit that this information is fundementally unknowable ahead of time by a passenger. in the very least the following are critical factors: In-flight passenger services are not a part of the planes MEL (Minimum Equipment List), so a plane can be dispatched without working Internet ...


6

I flew recently on a US domestic flight of four hours or so where it was announced that there would be no food service in the aisles, but there would be snacks and beverages available on request. We were also instructed to remove our masks only for each bite or sip, replacing them in between. Since the flight was completely full, this was the most time I'd ...


18

Yes. On flights when meals are normally served, they are still served just with different protocols. When doing a transatlantic flight during covid-19, there are two meals, one dinner and one breakfast. Each meal was served entirely packaged and we were instructed to remove our masks only after the service crew cleared our aisle. Beverage service was the ...


8

Easy: it will NOT be robust and it will be slow! I don't think I've ever had a flight without interruptions and/or occasional sluggishness. It varies a lot day to day even on the same exact route. For US domestic you have a good chance of getting at decent WIFI for at least 50% percent of the flight. Anything else is hit or miss. Actually it's mostly "...


8

As suggested in other answers, it depends. In Europe, EASA Health and Safety protocol published June 30th, 2020, recommends reduced service: Aircraft operators should reduce in-flight services to the minimum necessary to ensure passenger comfort and well-being and limit contact between cabin crew members and passengers, giving proper consideration to the ...


5

Are there still meals in airliners? That depends on the flight. Some countries do/did impose meal restrictions for domestic flights, e.g. at some point Thailand banned inflight catering on domestic flights (mirror) (December 31, 2020). But I'm not aware of such bans for long-haul flights: all long-haul flights I've seen did allow meals.


2

Yes. You take off your mask. I know this from a short haul flight, so logic says longer ones are more likely to have food.


2

The usual historical flight data sources such as Flightaware, Flightstats or Flightradar24 can go back quite a bit, though how much they go back seems variable. The top-level flightradar24 subscription says 3 years. Depending on the areas covered, there may be local databases as well. So for recently added flights, that would be an option. For flights that ...


4

Go there a day earlier and check it out in person. There is a 90% that it will be in the same place the next day. This depends a lot on the airline and the airport but unless the airline has a major presence in the airport, it's allocated dynamically. As long as the flight schedules don't change much, the allocation doesn't change that often but it DOES ...


Top 50 recent answers are included