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2

In general, electronic devices are allowed, provided they don't contain forbidden substances (anything highly flammable, radioactive, explosive, liquids etc.). Practically, most devices without large batteries in them are OK. Batteries are indeed dangerous, hence the limits and the requirements to keep devices with batteries in carry-on. Anecdotally, I once ...


0

The same rules apply to pretty much all aircraft carriers. If you can bring your stuff with one then you should have no problems with any other. In addition to your carry-on and bag/backpack you are also allowed to bring things from the tax-frees.


33

I asked them via Messenger and it appears that power supplies are allowed with no restriction


13

The What Can I Bring page does not list this explicitly but it does list Phone Chargers which are similar in function but also Bread Machine, Laptops, Sewing Machine all of which require AC/DC units. Also power inverter. If you want to be 100% sure For items not listed here, simply snap a picture or send a question to AskTSA on Facebook Messenger or ...


5

If by "power supply" you mean something you connect to a wall socket, and which can then supply DC power to some electronics, then certainly -- people routinely fly with those in their cabin baggage (they might call them laptop chargers instead, but a power supply is what it is). If you're speaking about a battery bank that doesn't need to be receive grid ...


10

It depends a lot on the airport and the individual screener. The TSA itself is fairly inconsistent in applying their own rules and very ineffective at detecting actual weapons etc. I've certainly had engagements with security employees that obviously didn't know their own rules or just made them up on the fly. Just two weeks ago I get yelled at because I ...


1

Putting them in checked package is simpler and safer. In theory you cannot leave such bottles on the original packages, but if you do not have other liquids, you may interpret that the original packages is the transparent bag. Often you can pass the security check in similar cases: security staff can see the interior (and check which kind of liquid and size)...


3

I'm sitting at YYZ right now, and managed to scout out a (relatively) not-busy part of T1 to measure the sizers. Almost every sizer is of the old type: composed of metal tubing welded together to form a frame. I also saw a few new sizers that are powder coated black sheet metal, and look much less forgiving. Here's what I found: Common Style These sizers ...


4

No, security requires the bottles be removed from the original packaging. The Heathrow.com page on Security contains this text about carrying liquids with you into the cabin: Liquids - 100 ml rule Only limited quantities of liquids may be carried through airport security into the departure lounge. This includes bottled drinks, suntan lotion, fragrances, ...


4

This depends on the airline for example Xiamen Air in China do not count foldable luggage carts as extra carry on and happily lets it come in board without issues. However I tried the same on Air China and had to check it. So best check the rules on the airline in question


2

There are luggage carts which run on two wheels and have a waist strap. It is hard to find them online, only one for sale (as far as I found them) and that one is not for sale yet. But I have seen earlier versions in the past, so long ago that google can not find the photos from the few details I remember. You can also buy a shopping trolley or the right ...


3

According to Rwanda Civil Aviation Authority bags for liquids at the airport are not only allowed but are necessary https://maps.prodafrica.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/4861_geodir_Document_Security_Information_to_be_published_on_RCAA_website_.pdf


5

A medical certificate is unlikely to be of that much help. It's possible that presenting one would allow you to keep a trolley in the queue, but there's really not any kind of standardized procedure for that, so it simply comes down to whatever employee happens to be overseeing the checkpoint, and that person is likely to be busy, not really interested in ...


1

This page on the TSA website says it's ok. https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/whatcanibring/items/laser-pointers


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