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2

If you have a good amount of cash (Cash to burn), for the trip being a planned one and maybe to a remote location, you could splash out and buy yourself a Breitling Emergency watch. Now these things are not cheap. You are talking $15k + They come equipped with an authentic dual frequency distress beacon "A marvel of miniaturisation and technical ...


1

The crucial point is directing the emergency personnel correctly. The question seems to be "Where am I?", but indeed the question is "How can they reach to me?" For an useful and relatively short answer, you have to act as the eyes of the emergency personnel and help them to quickly identify your approximate location. You need immediate help; you want help; ...


0

All Samsung phones I had (and this is probably true for many other phones as well, Xiaomi phones being an example of not having this functionality) have an "Urgency Mode" (translated from French). It is triggered by long-pressing the power button and pressing the relevant icon, or pressing the power button quickly five times. It automatically sends SMSes ...


5

This answer explains the importance and value of maps and compasses. An additional point worth making is that many popular trails will have periodic signs giving location information such as nearest street, postcodes, and, best of all, Ordnance survey grid-references. Here is an example where the grid-reference is ST835128]: (the 'ST' part is not on the ...


2

If you use an Android phone with Google services enabled (which is the case if you did not put your own firmware) then you can continuously share your location with people you choose. The positioning is not always 100% accurate but for a slow moving person (walking) it should be good enough (I noticed that when biking, some of the points (maybe one or two ...


5

If you have a working internet connection (and I realize that it is a big "if"), then chances are that you already have a messaging app installed that can do that: Whatsapp, Telegram, and Facebook Messenger all have an option to send your GPS-determined location to a contact with a couple of clicks. This is probably obvious for many of you, but I thought it ...


0

I have an app called Life360. It tracks your location using GPS, and at any time you can send a help alert witch notifies emergency contacts by text and email and you can call emergency services. Your last known location can be viewed by selected people at any time. Link to download.


2

If you do have cell service and have an iPhone on you, you can send an Emergency SOS. It will call Emergency Services for you and send your location to your emergency contacts. Your emergency contact will have your location and should be able to provide it to the emergency services, if you are unable to do so (for example when you lose consciousness) or your ...


5

One practically free option is to have a strobe light app installed on your mobile phone. Some of those apps support the "SOS" pattern. It doesn't help much during daylight, but after the sunset light beacons are very effective. Even on the bottom of a ravine, there's a good chance that strobe light will be visible to rescue boats / helicopters. Obviously, ...


37

I'm amazed that the answers here are all reliant on technology. This is a problem that existed long before the advent of phones, GPS and satellite communications. The real answer is that you must be personally responsible and do a bit of planning and preparation. Here is what they teach children about trekking/hiking in the UK and I assume most of the rest ...


4

Potentially better than a PLB may be a satellite phone, of course in combination with GPS. Although I'm not sure if coverage is better, with a satellite phone one can talk. Only Iridium has global coverage, but you can consider cheaper alternatives if they have coverage where you're going. Forget about regular mobile phones: mobile phones only have ...


9

Jack of all trades vs master of one, and terrain Emergency Locator Transmitters are marvelous things, but the infrastructure to support a truly excellent one is fantastically expensive. As such, the world actually got together on something, and built one system called the 406 MHz ELT. Everyone uses it - ships at sea, jetliners, and hikers willing to ...


18

There's a really neat app I just discovered called what3words. It encodes your location (precise to 3x3 meters) as three words in the English language. The statue of liberty is encoded as toned.melt.ship. If you were to call emergency services, the idea would be that it's far easier to give them three words that correspond to your exact location than to ...


2

You can use an old-fashioned flare gun and hope that someone will report it. Whistles and mirrors/lights are also often used in case of emergencies. More modern option is Spot which uploads your position at least every 60 minutes and allows you to call for help or mark as safe. Because it uses GPS and sends messages through similar frequencies you need to ...


8

If you've got a data signal and smartphone, in some countries the emergency services can send you a text (SMS) containing a link. You click the link, give the browser permission to send your location, and they know where you are. This worked well for me when I crashed my bike in Ireland and had to call an ambulance for myself (in the middle of nowhere, ...


71

If away from civilization (and I will count this particular instance as falling there), the real answer is to have either a Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) or a Spot/InReach device. They each have their relative pluses and minuses. A PLB is a small handheld (about the size of an adult fist) device that uses multiple emergency channels to provide information ...


39

In some countries, AML (Advanced Mobile Location) will automatically send your location to the emergency services when you call them. However: This currently only works in 15 countries This may not work with all phones This may not work using all emergency services numbers It may not work if you are roaming One can refer to the EENA (European Emergency ...


0

What I usually do is trying to get my ticket upgraded so that I'll have access to the Fast Track and Lounge. This makes the journey a lot easier.


2

Swede's have the option to use the website Flygresor.se which can include the surcharge for a checked bag and also for climate compensation and payment method. The site only searches prices through Swedish travel agencies, not directly with the carriers. Because of this prices are only available in SEK and support is very limited. The airline selection ...


7

I book flights regularily and actually keep a list of hidden charges for the sites that come up near the top of any search regularily. Then, when I make a new search and see the prices listed, I simply add the hidden charges I know about in my head. Typically, the offers are close enough together that the hidden charges actually do make a difference. It's a ...


11

For Aussies such as yourself, my site - Beat That Flight (and beta Android app) might be able to help a bit. For example, on a search from Sydney to Hong Kong - on the left side, you can see baggage options, with the perceived difference in price: It's not perfect, and relies on data on upstream providers as well, but makes an effort to try and calculate ...


7

Kayak is not my first choice of search engines, but I do note that it now attempts to factor carry-ons and checked bags into the price. You have to start the search and then change the zero bags default in the filters. Kiwi.com (which I also am not thrilled with) will tell you which flights allow NO bags, which isn't a great help, but it's something. ...


2

For me, it's all about interlocking - making sure I can't get past one thing without hitting something else. If I'm staying in a hotel, my jacket doesn't need to hang up in the wardrobe. Best place for it is over the door handle, or hanging off the door closer. My keys, cards, etc., can all be in the jacket. The door will be deadbolted and quite possibly ...


1

Another solution that I take is; when you unpack, for a those brief minutes, be more mindful, focused and 'present' about what you are doing and where you are putting things, eg don't be thinking of anything else at the same time. This will help you put things in the correct places and also it will help you remember where you put those items when you come ...


0

I travel a lot as well, and I never forget anything anymore. I use the ColorNote App (for Android) to keep track of my packing list, which I re-use after each trip. I've been honing it for about 8 years and I feel I've reached the level of Packing Ninja! :-D I put everything on the list that I might possibly want to bring for both personal and business ...


5

tl;dr Be tidy and leave cupboards and draws open to indicate you’ve checked they’re clear. I have a sequence I follow when leaving a location I’m not returning to, particularly hotel rooms but most applies to any location. Tidy my surroundings, it’s harder to find things in a messy environment. This includes clearing rubbish or at least consolidating it ...


3

What I use is a Trello board with three lists on it: The first list is things that I have at home. I keep a card on this list for each item I have that I'm planning on packing for the trip. This helps make sure I don't forget to pack things, as well as coming in handy for keeping track of things at the end of the trip. For sets like toiletries that mostly ...


2

I'm not sure how applicable it is to travel, but I have a technique for not leaving my things at work. I count them, and should always get the same number. If I didn't bring that thing with me that day, I count it off all the same. I take my keys, wallet, phone, headphones, drink bottle and sunglasses. Before I go home I pat each object in my pockets, or ...


2

Doing a search of each place you leave prevents most lost items. The other thing is to get everything back into place after each use. That means a lot of taking stuff in and out of bags but it does help. The other tip that is harder to get used to is to remember the feel of the back weight and bulk. I travel enough that I can notice small changes in weight,...


44

There are a variety of strategies you can use but they all involve a cost of time. I use different strategies in different places. First and foremost is what we calling "walking the campsite" (because it came from camping trips where leaving something behind could be catastrophic). You literally walk from room to room in the hotel (or wherever you are) ...


4

Some tips that might help: Whenever you are visiting a place, locate the item you don't want to forget (such as your adapter) near something you definitely will not forget (your jacket for example). Or (but this can take some practice), connect your jacket to the adapter in your mind in the most funny strange way you can think about (e.g. when you take on ...


1

If you can reduce, the number of things you carry with you, outside of where you are staying, so you can check for them every time you stand up. As a habit I now check for my wallet, keys and phone every time I stand up, and they all have their own pocket. In essence Awkward Zombie was on to something


4

Write a list of everything you want to take with you on a trip, use it to pack your bags, then at the end go through that same list and check you still have those things before you leave


7

Those things (which I also often forget) have something in common: they are out of sight and out of mind, and easy to overlook especially when in a hurry: The toiletries are probably in the bathroom, maybe under a towel or in the shower behind a fold of the shower curtain, and it's easy to forget to look there or to miss a spot The adapter is wherever the ...


6

Remember that you can forget things, so e.g. for the charger, when it is not attached to the computer, put it in your bag. If you need it again, you will take it out again. Put things in evident places. I put often my umbrella under my chair at restaurants, so that I would probably see it also if it stop raining. If you forget your bag, it is probably that ...


21

I make a conscious, visual check of my surroundings every time I leave the place (restaurant, lodging, bus, etc) I've been in. "Conscious" is important: running one's eyes over the walls and floors and so on so that you're really seeing what's there. Works very well, and has become a useful habit.


5

I have flown with many duffel bags as hold luggage and I have never had a problem with the handles. The warning you quote refers mostly to big rucksacks which have thick loose shoulder straps, and maybe even chest and waist straps. Having said this, if you want to be extra careful with your luggage there are a few options you can consider: Get a rucksack ...


3

A solution that might help you is called Poste restante, meaning Staying at the post office. The trick is to give as your address, your name followed by the mention "Poste restante" and the address of a specific post office near you. The letter or package will be delivered to this office and you will be able to get it by presenting an ID. As an example, you ...


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