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7

This is what Ryanair says on their website. So for a 5 min change you are not going to be able to cancel. Occasionally due to unforeseen circumstances flight times may have to be changed. If this happens we do our best to contact all customers via the email and mobile phone number you provided at the time of booking. We also recommend to review ...


2

Rule Number 1 (for Q2): be truthful, give a realistic itinerary. The enter and exit days counts as full days. Q4: You may not enter before the first day stated on the visa. Note: Some visas (often first time visas) are issued for a date range. More often a amount of days (duration). If nothing is given then 90 days within a 180 period. So if the visa is ...


39

The airline did NOT cancel your flight. They cancelled a flight that you were not booked on at the time of the cancellation. It is as simple as this. You were not booked on the flight, so you are due no compensation. IF you had not already canceled your tickets, and you were still booked on the flight at the time of the cancellation, then you might have ...


17

First off, let’s see what the EU261 regulations say about compensation: Air carriers should compensate passengers if they fail to do this, except when the cancellation occurs in extraordinary circumstances which could not have been avoided even if all reasonable measures had been taken. That does not necessarily mean you are not due compensation, because ...


0

You can you use B1/B2 visa but if you enter with this visa, you will enter as a visitor. You will not be able to work in the US and must leave within the time stamped on the I-94. So if you are ready to go ahead and quit your job and just want to visit the US in the interim before returning to Mexico to apply for a new TN for your new job, this will work.


1

There is no EU resident/citizen database authorities could use to double-check your data and no EU-wide rule regulating this matter. As often, what the EU mandates is that other EU citizens are treated on a par with citizens. It's still up to the country to regulate police checks, registration and identification requirements as they like. Depending on the ...


8

No. Official ID documents have many features to prevent forgery or manipulation. They might also be officially invalidated when a new one is issued before the expiry date. A copy has none of those -- it might easily be photoshopped. The only use for a photocopy or digital scan is as a handy reference of all the relevant data, in case the original gets lost....


5

No, it's not acceptable. Besides the police, what's the point? How are you travelling? Most airplanes, some trains, checking in hotels, renting a car: they all require some form of identification. For crossing borders too, and even for Schengen borders you might need some official ID. If you lose your credit card, you might use your ID for getting money ...


2

You can also use the train ferry which is subsidised and not super expensive to the Netherlands and Ireland: https://www.seat61.com/trains-and-routes/london-to-amsterdam-by-ferry.htm https://www.seat61.com/Ireland.htm It’s probably best not to try and circumvent the ferry rules when you’re travelling across an international border, they could deport you ...


3

A quick check on the most basic ferry of all, Dover-Calais with P&O, reveals that the cost of a car is the same no matter how many people are in in it. Simply check the price on this site and vary the number of people. I suspect that most other routes are the same. However you do have to book the number of people, so your plan to hitch a ride is ...


2

The Eurotunnel might be your best bet as they do charge per car (and up to 9 passengers.) It is also the quickest crossing. That said, security is quite heavy on channel crossings, and the penalties for people smuggling high so I suspect that it will not be easy to find someone willing to offer a lift.


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