Hot answers tagged

71

Overcurrent isn't the only reason for an airline circuit to trip. It might also be looking for ground faults/residual current (GFCI/RCD) or listening for arc faults (AFCI). Any appliance can have either problem. Trains are electric beasts - even a diesel train has the diesel engine driving a giant electric generator on the order of 3 million watts (with ...


69

There is no such device because what you are proposing is impractical. Laptop chargers require between 100 and 240 volts alternating current input. (Some may require a more limited range). USB sockets give 5V direct current, not anywhere near enough to charge a laptop, and the wrong type. Building a device that could convert 5V DC to the range of AC ...


63

The cord is marked with the maximal voltage the insulation between the wires in it is designed to withstand. It will transmit lower voltages just fine and not be harmed. It is also marked with the maximal current it can carry before it might begin to overheat and become a fire hazard. Since the cord is rated for 2.5 A and the power supply promises to draw ...


59

The simple answer is, no, this won't be allowed in any normal hotel-hotel. Very simply, use holidayrentals.co.uk or airBnB.com to rent a "gite" instead. You'll save more money and it will be far more suitable for what you want. You can instantly find examples of what you want, https://www.homeaway.co.uk/p78239 You mention a TWO WEEK stay so, indeed, it is ...


54

This feature is becoming increasingly common in many establishments. In my opinion the purpose of such card-activated time switches is to reduce costs: the removal of the card ensures that some/all electronic appliances are turned off when the guest leaves the room, thus saving money to the hotel. Indeed guests are often given one card to access the room ...


50

Those circled holes will be for various plug style's grounds, however -- That is not a standard socket. That is entirely an invention of the Chinese junk sellers. It has not been approved by any competent testing laboratory, and it definitely never will. This type of socket is simply trying to adapt too many kinds of plugs, at the expense of safety, and ...


49

A breaker tripping is a serious sign of trouble. Something shorted or started to draw excessive current. If not for the breaker, it would probably have caught fire. (Or the circuit was already overloaded - but since it happened in two different places, that seems unlikely.) So this is a safety hazard if not resolved. Since it doesn't happen normally, I ...


47

All the middle holes are there for accepting various types of ground (earth) pins. Specifically, the top two holes are there for British plugs (BS 546, BS 1363), while the bottom two are there for Brazilian, Danish and Swiss plugs. As always, Wikipedia has the gory details: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AC_power_plugs_and_sockets


47

Yes, it's generally safe. Adapters don't have any active components, so assuming they're all rated for the voltage/amps you're putting through, there's little risk of overload etc like there is with transformers. The main catch is that if you plug a three-pin plug into a series of adapters that "loses" the third pin, your device will no longer be grounded. ...


46

If a socket says "100 W max", it doesn't mean, that your laptop would be drawing less. Your laptop/charger will draw what it needs. The socket will provide the power that your laptop needs, until it reaches the rating of the circuit breaker, and it will trip (as you have experienced). Also, as the 2 comments already have mentioned, a load peak can always ...


44

Mains power is not like a precise lab instrument with strict voltage ranges. The European Standard EN50160 (this is a draft, the standard is an expensive download) for example prescribes +-10%, the UK standard prescribes +10% -6% in the power supply (search for "frequency and voltage at supply" in the standard without quotes) so 230V in reality is a wide ...


41

This alone explains it all: it also happens when I plug the charger alone without the laptop at the other end. Because of the way power supplies are constructed, they draw extremely short, but very large "inrush" current. This can sometimes even visually manifest itself as a tiny spark when plugging it in. The PSU doesn't even need to be turned on, it's ...


41

The first thing to do is check all your appliances. Check wether they are multi voltage. You will see that printed on them somewhere. I have yet to encounter a laptop or mobile phone charger that was not good for 100-250V, 50-60Hz. Those kinds of adaptors have been accepting a wide range of AC voltages and frequencies by default for a long time. The shaver ...


32

I have seen these cards control everything including plugs (so annoying to leave your laptop charging while you go out for the day, and come back to find the plug was not on while you were gone) just lights but not plugs lights and air conditioner but not plugs just the air conditioner Whether it exists and what it controls seems to vary around the world. ...


32

All the devices you mentioned charge via USB, so really all you need to do is carry a USB wall adapter, that is compatible with USA / UK voltages. I carry with me a macbook pro lightbar 2016 wall charger: Easy to adapt to any wall adapter, since it comes with multiple wall heads and these are easily found in most local shops. Has universal voltage support. ...


31

Laptops take too much power It's perfectly reasonable to think that would work. The problem is the laptop class of machines just take more power than readily available present-day USB plugs can possibly serve - 5 or 10 watts depending on vintage and quality. An iPad will use the full 10 watts and then some when at full screen brightness playing a game - ...


31

Am I correct that adapter mode would burn a US appliance, or am I wrong? Yes, you are correct. If used in "adapter" mode, the voltage is not adjusted or converted in any way, and in most cases a device expecting only 120V (USA/North America/etc.) will be damaged when plugged into the 240V source. But it's worse than that. Even when used in "converter" mode,...


31

Looks like a standard “kettle lead” or IEC 60320 C13/C14 lead to me, pretty easy to get anywhere there are computers - they usually breed in drawers or the back of cupboards when noone is looking. Should be able to get one at any computer parts store - just ask if you dont see them on display, as people so infrequently buy them on their own (because they ...


29

No need for converters, your charger accepts anything form 100V to 240V. It is safe to use it anywhere in the world. Note that the output of AC-DC adapters will always be the same regardless of the input voltage.


28

The ONLY relevant thing to check is the label on the power supply. It states "Input 100V-240V, 50/60Hz". Any outlet that provides voltage and frequencies in that range is safe to use. That covers almost all countries and certainly the US which operates at 120V/60Hz. You may need a passive plug adapter (or travel adapter) since the physcial shape of the ...


26

It looks like your laptop is tripping the RCD rather than the regular circuit breaker: a device tripping the regular CB will simply start smoking if the CB doesn't trip, and your laptop seems to work in some places. AFAIK RCD protective devices are mandatory in hotels in the EU. While this is sometimes due to the power supply design and not an actual ...


25

Get a European USB Charger I would buy a USB charger with a European plug (image courtesy of aliexpress): Travel Convenient EU Plug Wall USB Charger Adapter For Samsung Galaxy S5 S4 S3 Note 3 by Ali Express, fair use It beats the weight of your US charger plus a plug adapter, it's cheap a as dirt (2-something bucks on eBay), it can be used for all your ...


25

There are two types of travel adapter plugs commonly used: Plug adapters. These just convert the physical plug into one of a different shape, but do not perform any voltage conversion. It is perfectly fine and common to use one with a power strip (with surge protector). As Aganju points out, you should be careful not to overload any circuits, as a power ...


25

As an Italian citizen, what legal documents we are supposed to carry when we will be traveling to Ireland? Passport or national ID card (carta d'identità), provided it does not say non valida per l'espatrio on the back. If the carta does say this then it is not valid as a travel document outside of Italy. Also what electrical adapter (for mobile and ...


24

Traveling with a power-strip is an old trick for avoiding to carry multiple plug adaptors, but going from the US to Europe you need to be a little careful. Electricity in the US is ~110 volts, whilst in much of the rest of the world it's 200-250 volts. Although power boards/power strips are generally passive, and thus the number of volts should not have ...


24

There's nothing in your pictures that indicates that they shouldn't work on a European grid. I think you need to treat this exactly like any other instance of: My laptop and/or its power brick died unexpectedly while I'm traveling. Assuming your employer is not so large that they have an office (with local IT support) near you, typically the plan would be ...


23

Your laptop and phone chargers are designed to operate at a voltage between 100 - 240 V. Your electric shaver on the other hand may not be able to handle the different voltages and will not work in the USA. Unfortunately for the electric shaver, you are stuck with 220V. The best way to make sure is to check on the device or its power supply. An example of ...


23

Almost certainly, each AC to DC converter you have will support both UK and US voltages, and you do not need a voltage converter. To be absolutely sure, look at the back of your laptop's charger and your AC-to-USB plug. There should be a label that, among other things, specifies supported input voltages and AC frequencies. If it says something like "100-...


23

As others have said, almost all laptop and phone chargers will support 100-250V at 50 or 60Hz. They have switch mode power supplies, which for various technical reasons I won't go into, are very easy to build to support all the world's major domestic voltage and frequency standards, so almost all of them are built as such. Check on the chargers themselves to ...


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