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1

There are no connection guarantees It's cheaper for a reason. If anything goes wrong with the first flight, or if you are delayed in immigration, you miss and forfeit the second flight and are stuck in the UK. For instance, "I have onward travel" is part of how you convince UKVI that you are only transiting and not looking to immigrate. If you say "here'...


2

Have you looked into in-cabin travel for your pet? A few airlines do allow pets to travel in-cabin on international flights. See this Q&A on this site (which may be a bit out of date by this point), this 2016 guide from dogjaunt.com, and this more recent run-down of airline policies (focusing on North-American-based airlines.) In-cabin travel is ...


1

Unfortunately it could be very difficult and costly. Personally I would check with airlines and cargo airlines about solution. Often there are much more possibilities (with extra prices). Cruise ships usually do not allows pets (but for blind people, and often not in such case: a dog cannot help in case of emergency, so now cruise ships requires an ...


2

For me, it's all about interlocking - making sure I can't get past one thing without hitting something else. If I'm staying in a hotel, my jacket doesn't need to hang up in the wardrobe. Best place for it is over the door handle, or hanging off the door closer. My keys, cards, etc., can all be in the jacket. The door will be deadbolted and quite possibly ...


1

Another solution that I take is; when you unpack, for a those brief minutes, be more mindful, focused and 'present' about what you are doing and where you are putting things, eg don't be thinking of anything else at the same time. This will help you put things in the correct places and also it will help you remember where you put those items when you come ...


0

I travel a lot as well, and I never forget anything anymore. I use the ColorNote App (for Android) to keep track of my packing list, which I re-use after each trip. I've been honing it for about 8 years and I feel I've reached the level of Packing Ninja! :-D I put everything on the list that I might possibly want to bring for both personal and business ...


5

tl;dr Be tidy and leave cupboards and draws open to indicate you’ve checked they’re clear. I have a sequence I follow when leaving a location I’m not returning to, particularly hotel rooms but most applies to any location. Tidy my surroundings, it’s harder to find things in a messy environment. This includes clearing rubbish or at least consolidating it ...


3

What I use is a Trello board with three lists on it: The first list is things that I have at home. I keep a card on this list for each item I have that I'm planning on packing for the trip. This helps make sure I don't forget to pack things, as well as coming in handy for keeping track of things at the end of the trip. For sets like toiletries that mostly ...


2

I'm not sure how applicable it is to travel, but I have a technique for not leaving my things at work. I count them, and should always get the same number. If I didn't bring that thing with me that day, I count it off all the same. I take my keys, wallet, phone, headphones, drink bottle and sunglasses. Before I go home I pat each object in my pockets, or ...


2

Doing a search of each place you leave prevents most lost items. The other thing is to get everything back into place after each use. That means a lot of taking stuff in and out of bags but it does help. The other tip that is harder to get used to is to remember the feel of the back weight and bulk. I travel enough that I can notice small changes in weight,...


44

There are a variety of strategies you can use but they all involve a cost of time. I use different strategies in different places. First and foremost is what we calling "walking the campsite" (because it came from camping trips where leaving something behind could be catastrophic). You literally walk from room to room in the hotel (or wherever you are) ...


4

Some tips that might help: Whenever you are visiting a place, locate the item you don't want to forget (such as your adapter) near something you definitely will not forget (your jacket for example). Or (but this can take some practice), connect your jacket to the adapter in your mind in the most funny strange way you can think about (e.g. when you take on ...


1

If you can reduce, the number of things you carry with you, outside of where you are staying, so you can check for them every time you stand up. As a habit I now check for my wallet, keys and phone every time I stand up, and they all have their own pocket. In essence Awkward Zombie was on to something


4

Write a list of everything you want to take with you on a trip, use it to pack your bags, then at the end go through that same list and check you still have those things before you leave


7

Those things (which I also often forget) have something in common: they are out of sight and out of mind, and easy to overlook especially when in a hurry: The toiletries are probably in the bathroom, maybe under a towel or in the shower behind a fold of the shower curtain, and it's easy to forget to look there or to miss a spot The adapter is wherever the ...


6

Remember that you can forget things, so e.g. for the charger, when it is not attached to the computer, put it in your bag. If you need it again, you will take it out again. Put things in evident places. I put often my umbrella under my chair at restaurants, so that I would probably see it also if it stop raining. If you forget your bag, it is probably that ...


21

I make a conscious, visual check of my surroundings every time I leave the place (restaurant, lodging, bus, etc) I've been in. "Conscious" is important: running one's eyes over the walls and floors and so on so that you're really seeing what's there. Works very well, and has become a useful habit.


3

As others have noted, it might make sense going North/South. I recently travelled from Johannesburg to Bucharest via Israel. I think it probably was a relatively cheap way to make the trip - first leg with El Al, second leg with Wizz Air - but I wouldn't necessarily recommend it: El Al is pretty bad, and it was a pain to 1) get subjected to 40 min ...


2

The rule when applying for a Schengen visa is typically that your travel documents (passport, residence permit etc) must be valid for a given period of time after the date you propose to exit the Schengen zone. If you already have your visa, you can use it within the number of days/validity period granted. Schengen authorities will really only care that you ...


2

How one may travel to the US is determined by one's citizenship. Some citizens of other countries may travel to the US for non-immigrant purposes (i.e., travel) without a visa. Others may be eligible for ESTA, an electronic system that grants (or denies) permission to come to the US border to seek admission without having a visa. Refugee Travel Documents ...


3

Italy is part of the Schengen Area. For short stays (not exceeding 90 days in total during any 180-day period), the whole 26-state area is treated as a single country as regards passport validity, maximum visa-free stay and passport stamps. Your passport must remain valid for at least three months beyond the end of your proposed stay. If only planning a ...


4

Having a visa for the US does not allow you to enter Canada. You can find out if you need a visa for Canada here http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/visit/visas.asp


1

As other people said, you won't have to claim and re-check your baggage. I would add that I had multiple times short-time layovers in Munich, even just 55 minutes and I never had any problems, even when my flight had a 20-mins delay. Munich is a very large airport but signs are everywhere so you will know where to go and should be fine!


2

Your bags should be tagged for Copenhagen and not made available to you in Munich. As you will not have time to leave the airport during your layover, head straight to your connecting gate, without passing baggage claim. Your entire layover should be in terminal 2. Arriving from an airport in a “safe” country you should normally not have to go through ...


0

You will NOT have to claim and re-check your bags if the entire booking is under the same ticket. When you go to drop off your luggage at the US airport just confirm with the agent that they'll be booked all the way through to your final destination. As far as checkpoints, you will have to do both security check and passport control, from my experience ...


0

It took me three trips to as many post offices to get the International Driving Permit for Taiwan! On the first occasion, I was told my photo did not meet the passport photo requirements where the background colour needed to be of a light shade but not white. This was obviously a misinterpretation by the post office clerk as all that was needed was a ...


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