132

Tipping is not at all mandatory in Germany and usually the service personnel does not rely on tips as much as in the USA, say. Usually, if you do not state the amount you want to round up to ("make it X EUR" — or "Stimmt so" if you do not expect change at all), they will start picking up coins from their purse and give you the exact amount of change ...


131

In many parts of Europe it is considered rude for a restaurant to bring you your bill without being asked. Meals are expected to be relaxed, unhurried affairs, and for a restaurant to bring the bill, or ask for payment, without being asked is seen as them trying to hurry you out. As such it is absolutely expected that you ask for the bill, or if you already ...


94

In France it is required by law to provide tap water to a customer, for free. It is very common and acceptable to ask for tap water in a pitcher in a restaurant. Don't hesitate to ask for a refill.


92

they can exploit it in their favor Everything in restaurants¹ is more expensive than the pure cost to acquire or produce it. This is how the waiting staff and location is paid. The only difference in Germany is that there is no culture of offering free tap water everywhere. Thus asking for tap water in a German restaurant (and expecting to pay less than ...


92

Tipping is still the norm in any U.S. establishment where you do not seat and serve yourself—that is, everywhere except fast-food restaurants and places organized as food courts or cafeterias where you order at a counter. In buffet-style restaurants, where the server does not take your order or serve more than drinks, the standard is lower (10-15% instead of ...


88

I have spent most of my life living somewhere inside the M25 (and a good fraction of that inside various pubs) and I have to say that I've never heard of any of these gestures. I don't mean that you are certainly wrong but perhaps their use is indeed arcane. Most ale drinkers (and I include myself in this) would need to specify exactly which ale they want, ...


67

As your main reason to shy tipping is ‘being uncomfortable doing it‘, I’ve added this answer, even though it misses the question given. In sit-down restaurants, normally nobody sees you doing the tipping - it happens after you paid, and before you leave. Staff will only know the amount of your tip when you have long left (from experience, this is not known ...


66

Next time, pay and report the restaurant to the Ontario's consumer protection board here. You need to pay and you should pay with a card so that there is paper trail of the payment. Make certain you take pictures of the menus, bill, and anything that could/should state or not if there is a cover charge or extra charge. Try to take the picture of the menus ...


62

TL;DR Tipping is never mandatory, but most Germans do it. 5%-10% is most common, round up to a whole number, or to 50 ct if amount < 10€ Not tipping does not automatically mean that you were unsatisfied, but could be a hint. Should I tip? In general, deciding whether or how much to tip is a subject of debate in Germany as well, just as in many other ...


61

The only logical explaination is that he was simply suggesting you to hurry up, because the pizza was getting cold and you wouldn't taste it in its best moment (when the mozzarella is still hot). Service in Italy is generally great, so what I would think is that he was doing me a favour. Actually there's also the possibility that he was stressing you to ...


55

I can reassure you that eating alone anywhere in London is not perceived as out of the ordinary. Any place you want to have lunch/dinner of just a coffee they will serve you with out any hesitation. London is a very busy city, individuals eating alone is common especially in the city centre where most businesses are placed.


54

"Inclusive of service" should mean that you are not expected to tip. That doesn't mean that you can't tip if you want to, especially if the service was good. The US restaurant business is pretty much wedded to tips, and they will be appreciated no matter what. However a Michelin 3-star restaurant should be paying its wait staff a decent wage, with or without ...


50

Normally, the sequence is this: Get the bill from the server. Check it for any issues. Give the server your credit card. The server goes off and swipes your card, coming back with your card and the receipt. There are two copies of the receipt, one for you and one for the restaurant. Write the tip on the restaurant copy and sign it; take your copy and your ...


50

In my experience, places where waiters may frown upon customers ordering tap water will happily accommodate you if you order a paid drink with it. Just order yourself an aperitif or a glass of cola / juice / beer, and ask the waiter to bring a pitcher along. This way, the restaurant still makes the profit they expect to make, and you get enough water.


49

It is common but not universal. Chain restaurants are usually open all days, smaller restaurants may take a day off during the week and Monday is a sensible choice because more people eat out over the weekend. Other businesses, particularly small businesses, may do the same if most of their trade is weekend shoppers. If you are wanting to visit a ...


47

As a French native, I discovered this practice in North America. I never asked for a doggy bag in France, nor have I seen someone do it. So it is likely restaurants don't even have boxes. You can obviously take out food from fast-food restaurants but for regular restaurants I don't think it is correct behaviour. I usually finish my dishes, I only order what ...


43

A quick search led me to this (German) article, which states: Das bei Touristen und Wienern gleichermaßen beliebte Traditions-Beisl "Zu den 2 Lieserln" hat zugesperrt. Auf der Homepage bedankt sich der Inhaber für die Treue und gibt bekannt, dass man "den Kampf gegen die äußeren Umstände verloren" habe und das "geliebte Gasthaus für immer schließen" müsse....


40

First of all, looking at the reviews for Osteria da Nico on Tripadvisor, regrettably you fell prey to a tourist trap. Regarding your question on pricing by weight: such is typical for foods such as meat (e.g. a steak) or especially seasonal fish but very untypical for regular courses (such as e.g. a Pizza). You can find the menu of a reputable Italian ...


38

No. You don't tip unless it's a delivery charge. For example, if you order takeout food and have them deliver (especially common in hotels), then you'd want to tip the driver. From Wikipedia: Tips are also generally given for services provided in golf courses, casino, hotels, concierge, food delivery, taxis, spa and salons. If you're going to the ...


37

There are some strategies that you can use: Prepare: Check websites like Tripadvisor or Yelp before you go there. If you really want to plan, write down the restaurants you want to visit. Based on the ratings and comments there, you should be able to judge if it is an authentic restaurant with a good service. Don't stick to the main street: Very often, ...


37

Since no-tipping restaurants are very rare in the U.S., your best bet is going to be to find restaurants where you are doing much of the work for yourself - counter-service restaurants, for example. There are many such restaurants in the U.S., although they veer toward the casual (most fast food restaurants are such). Fried chicken and barbecue restaurants ...


37

I would say that most restaurants in the UK are open seven days a week. However, if a restaurant is going to close for a day, that day will almost always be Monday. The same holds for shops and museums – and any other business that does most of its trade at the weekend. (And, if such a business is closed for two days, they'll likely be Monday ...


35

London has a constant flow of business travellers who are on their own and likely to be seen dining single. Also, there are several neighbourhoods that cater to the singles crowd. As a consequence, there is no stigma attached to eating alone like there might be in other cosmopolitan cities. But more to the point, London restaurants will happily ...


35

First, ask for the check. If you're in a real rush and paying by card, you could hand the waiter your credit card at this point to speed up the process a bit, but the normal thing to do is to ask for the check and wait for it to brought to you. The waiter will bring you the check. Take a look and make sure everything is as expected. Let him or her know if ...


34

There's a bit of per-country variation, but the rule of thumb across Western Europe is that service charges are already included in the bill (sometimes as a separate line item, sometimes not) and it's not necessary to tip in addition to this. If you must, and you usually wouldn't unless the service is really good, rounding up a euro or two to the nearest ...


34

This is how they avoid taxes. In Ukraine, there's a special regulation for small businesses, called "Private Entrepreneur" (приватний підприємець or фізична особа-підприємець, abbreviated ПП or ФОП). They have simplified requirements as per bookkeeping, quarterly reports, and — most importantly — lowered taxes and/or flat tax rate (contrary to a ...


33

I am uncomfortable with tipping and would much rather eat at sit-down restaurants in the United States that pay their employees fairly without expecting customers to supplement with tips (as occurs in many other countries in the world). In other words, I want to eat at restaurants that explicitly do not allow tips. You can't. That's simply not how it works ...


32

While much has been said about the price and legal aspects in other posts, I am trying to give a bit of a cultural perspective in this answer (at least as far as I perceive it, as a native German who regularly likes to go to not-too-expensive (meals between 10 and 15€) restaurants with varying groups of people). In German restaurant culture, drinks are ...


29

Scandinavia (where I'm from): matches the UK as described by Rory here. If the service is really good, you can tip upwards of 5-10% if you want. But please note that most entry-level jobs like cashiers, waiters, cabdriver etc. pays a lot better in Scandinavia than in the US (or frankly, most other countries), so you're not stealing anyone's lunch by not ...


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