Hot answers tagged

129

As Nate Eldredge pointed out this is against Air BnB's T&C's and could result in both you and the property provider being banned from their platform. But it's pretty dam unlikely you would get caught, so let's assume you and property owner have agreed to the deal you suggested. What additional downsides exist? The homeowner could take your cash, then ...


109

If you have been asked to bring something that belongs to "a friend of my friend", please make an excuse. I currently do not have the possibility to get more information about the owner or the book Never bring anything through customs that is not yours, or has not been packed by you, or has the opportunity to be "altered". If the friend-of-a-friend's ...


54

I would do this only for subsequent stays and with a written contract. I've done this. I was renting a furnished apartment for about 5 weeks over Airbnb¹. After about 3 weeks, the host asked if I wanted to renew, and if so, with or without Airbnb. He wrote a contract which we both signed, only then I paid, and less than through Airbnb. I don't care ...


33

I am with commenter Aganju here. In some countries this kind of things is completely normal, even among complete strangers. And in plain view of custom officers. I think it depends a lot on the level of mutual trust within a society vs. the availabality of other modes of sending (small) packages quickly. It is also a situation I have been involved in quite ...


28

Airbnb would almost certainly consider this to be a terms of service violation. From Section 14: In connection with your use of the Airbnb Platform, you will not and will not assist or enable others to: [...] use the Airbnb Platform to request, make or accept a booking independent of the Airbnb Platform, to circumvent any Service Fees or for any ...


16

Just a different view here. During floods in Kerala, India, I was in Singapore. There was a high problem of clean water, especially in rural Kerala. So, we friends met and found a high volume manual water filter that is found by a startup in Singapore. Problem is sending via mail or courier. It will take too much time to clear customs and by the time it ...


10

Yes, you are likely to find hosts that will agree. You are also likely to find a host who, upon your revelation of dishonesty, refuses to rent to you and reports you to AirBNB.


8

This depends on a lot of things but first and formost it should depend on how much trust you are willing to place in the ‘friend of a friend’ (hereafter FOAF) and in the friend whose friend it is. If the FOAF is someone I met a couple of times but whom I wouldn’t yet call a friend, if the actual friend of mine is someone I share and do a lot with and if the ...


6

Keep in mind that if you e-mail the agent for the property (owner or otherwise) saying, "I'll give you $1000 to stay here from June 1st to 7th this year" and they reply, "Ok," you now have a legally binding written contract. The risk here is not about not having a contract (even an oral agreement can be legally binding if correctly formed) but in how you ...


6

Yes, you should be covered. From Iberia web site: Passengers with Reduced Mobility (PRM) In air transport, current legislation defines a person with a disability or a Passenger with Reduced Mobility (PRM) as "any person whose mobility when using transport is reduced due to any physical disability (sensory or locomotor, permanent or temporary), intellectual ...


5

(IANAL) Technically at a Federal level I think you cannot do this unless you meet some specific requirements. From the ATF: May a nonimmigrant alien who has been admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa possess a firearm or ammunition in the United States? An alien admitted to the United States under a nonimmigrant visa is prohibited ...


4

As they say, if you have to ask, the answer is "No". It's fine to accept parcels from friends (I've done that myself), but only for a definition of "friend" which implies deep unconditional trust. Imagine you're stuck near that person's house with a body you need to get rid of. You have an explanation for what's happened, but a random stranger will likely ...


2

There are no Austrian laws or regulations directly related to dash cams. Just as in many other countries, privacy concerns and the right to surveillance of own property must be weighed against each other. The Supreme Administrative Court of Austria confirmed in a verdict in 2016 that the violation of privacy is excessive and that using dash cams is not ...


2

Am I likely to find hosts who would agree to this deal? Sure. I've done it myself. But on the part of the host-- long-term, off-the-books rentals are not wise. The laws vary by state but if a host allows a guest to stay in their home long enough (California is something trivial like 2 weeks), and they are collecting the equivalent of "rent" from the ...


2

Just say No. It's not your book, so you shouldn't be taking it unless you're being paid as (and have insurance as) a courier - which would be much more expensive than mailing the book. Also, is that book available in India? If so, it would probably be cheaper to buy a new copy. You don't know these people. You should not be risking so many unknowns for ...


1

The Reporting your presence is required in Italy, which the host must comply with. The likelihood is high that they are asking for the passport image beforhand so that they can fill out the form (twice) so that all you have to do is sign it upon arrival. If you don't want to do this, print out the corresponding form, fill it out properly and tell them ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible