132

Tipping is not at all mandatory in Germany and usually the service personnel does not rely on tips as much as in the USA, say. Usually, if you do not state the amount you want to round up to ("make it X EUR" — or "Stimmt so" if you do not expect change at all), they will start picking up coins from their purse and give you the exact amount of change ...


66

Next time, pay and report the restaurant to the Ontario's consumer protection board here. You need to pay and you should pay with a card so that there is paper trail of the payment. Make certain you take pictures of the menus, bill, and anything that could/should state or not if there is a cover charge or extra charge. Try to take the picture of the menus ...


62

TL;DR Tipping is never mandatory, but most Germans do it. 5%-10% is most common, round up to a whole number, or to 50 ct if amount < 10€ Not tipping does not automatically mean that you were unsatisfied, but could be a hint. Should I tip? In general, deciding whether or how much to tip is a subject of debate in Germany as well, just as in many other ...


29

For better or worse, it is quite standard for dim sum/yum cha places worldwide to charge cover charges, often mildly disguised as fees for peanuts, napkins, tea, sauces, which are all brought to your table without asking. I've seen this in Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, etc, which are notably all also places where cover charges in restaurants ...


25

Others have explained how tipping works normally in Germany. I'd like to add that what you describe would certainly be a reason for me to not tip at all, i.e. insist on my full change: refusing the correct change is just totally outside acceptable behaviour for a waiter. And by the way, it is less usual but not unheard of to first get the full change and ...


19

I'm Chinese and think this is really a culture difference. Not all Chinese restaurant have this kind of fee. Only Guang Dong (广式茶餐厅) and Hong Kong restaurants have this kind of fee. As a Chinese, the first time I went to Guangdong, I was surprised about this fee too. There, it's called 茶位费。- something like you go to restaurant and take a seat to drink a pot ...


17

No, you can't. As is generally the case in Singapore, most stalls are cash only or accept a limited set of local payment methods generally not including credit cards. However, Singapore being Singapore (and because cash-only transactions make it all too easy to evade taxes), the government is strong-arming all hawkers into accepting electronic payments, so ...


16

Tipping is generally never mandatory in Germany, but the general etiquette is: Restaurants and bars where they bring you food and drink to the table: Yes Restaurants where you carry your food to the table yourself: No Bars where you carry your drink to the table yourself: Optional, but doing so can improve quality of service if you want another drink later. ...


14

Nobody expects you to tip in Japan. Tipping in Japan means, that the service was better than expected and they then ask themselves, why you didn't expect a great service. There is a possibility to tip the room service for example, if you really want to (nobody expects it). But for doing that, you have to put the money inside an envelope and write their ...


13

The history between Turkey and Lebanon is...well...complicated. It's possible the waiters have some political leanings or connections to past events where the two countries have been at odds. Either way, if you're worried about similar situations in the future, just don't mention your Lebanese history. You don't have to lie, just omit that fact. "I was ...


11

Pay the bill, then double-check the menu and the entrance for signs informing you about the "sauce fee". If you don't find anything, inform the restaurant in writing that you disagree with the charge, joining a copy of the bill and the evidence you would collect while double-checking, like photos of the menu and the entrance. Give the restaurant enough time ...


11

In Japan, people don't expect to be tipped. If you give some, it might cause an awkward situation.


10

The behaviour of the waitress described is highly unusual for Germany. Were you at Oktoberfest or some other tourist trap location? Tipping in Germany is not mandatory, though it is very common to round up for an effective tip around 10%. Note that we don't go by percents, we go by convenience. So if your bill is 28.30 Euros, you would typically give 30 and ...


9

How much one tips also depends on the place; more in a restaurant where one sat at a table, less for takeout food, probably nothing in a bakery where one buys bread rolls. It is certainly possible to specify the tip when one hands over the money, as in "make it €15" when the bill says €14.20 (which would be on the stingy side). In the example given above, €...


8

Yes, typically you can return food if you have not eaten any/much of it. I would never accept food that I saw someone sneeze on, and what you were told is nonsense. Frankly if I were told that I'd get up and leave, not paying the bill. Legally though I don't know if there is any requirement to "make things right" or not. Certainly if you haven't paid ...


7

Why not simple decline to pay (that part of the bill)? Whom would they report you to? If they call the police, you can make your argument there, and you would potentially win. And whom else would they report you to?


7

TL;DR It depends on type of the garden. Most likely no one will kick you off, but in general try to avoid doing so. Why ? I live in Czechia since I was born and thats quite some time. I originate from small village (where it is not such a big deal), but currently I'm living in Brno for few years (second largest city in Czechia, after Prague). Naturally, I'...


7

Gurunavi, one of the main Japanese restaurant booking sites, has an option to filter for "completely non-smoking restaurants" (店内全面禁煙). Sample for Shinjuku, Tokyo: https://r.gnavi.co.jp/area/aream2115/kods00069/rs/ The catch is that the site is Japanese, and while Gurunavi has an English version, as far as I can see this option is not available there. (...


6

I usually round up to the next Euro when under €10, to the next second or third Euro when under €25-30. After that approx. 10% but not more than €5 except service was extraordinary and outstanding. If the service is below average (or prices are not reasonable), I don't tip since tip is actually already included in the price in Germany and Switzerland.


5

I am not sure how the tip is received by the Japanese person, as in whether they feel insulted or amused or bewildered. They do expect ‘Westerners’ to act weirdly and probably restaurant staff in popular tourist destinations has experienced people from a tipping culture wanting to leave more than the bill said. However, they will not keep the money. In one ...


5

The problem is not such much that tipping insults Japanese people, rather that they just don't understand it. It isn't part of their culture. Consider for instance the difference between Europe and America. A European might go to a restaurant in America, get charged $38.60 and leave behind two $20 bills. This is how tipping usually works in Europe; you ...


4

It is inappropriate. And frankly, there is no reason for that. The only reason for bringing your own food would probably be some kind of birthday party (in a pub), where your friends would give you a homemade cake.


4

The final say would be up to the restaurant themselves, however there is nothing in the rules that would stop you from doing this, and no reason that I can see that the restaurant wouldn't allow it. Keep in mind that this would only be beneficial if your Priority Pass membership includes a free guest - most don't, in which case you would need to pay a fee ...


4

In addition to Andy's suggestions, if the restaurant is giving you food that they sneezed on, that will be of concern to the state or local department of public health. I would encourage you to contact them and submit a description of what happened. (If you're ever in a similar situation, simply threatening that you will tell the department of public ...


3

Something doesn't feel quite right, although it may be okay. New Years eve is a prime spot for restaurants so it tends to be expensive and the hotels would like to get paid for every seat (and then some). They don't care if the guests actually show up, but they want to get paid for food, band, staff, decoration, etc. They really don't want any non-revenue ...


3

In some countries, it is common for restaurants to ask for a guarantee for some reservations, especially for larger tables or specific events. It is actually very common for New Year's Eve, as on that evening: * they have only one seating instead of 2 or more, * there is usually a fixed menu with more expensive food that usual * they may have to pay staff ...


3

I just tried asking for a box in a pizza and tapas restaurant in La Plagne, France. It was no problem at all, worked just like in the US. They brought me a pizza box for the leftover pizza. Maybe this is different than other places in France because La Plagne gets a lot of tourists -- but it's never unreasonable to ask to take food with you that you paid for....


3

10% is the usual amount. But if you have cash, what you usually do is take the amount, and round it up. If your bill is €24.30, you leave €27 which is very close to 10%. If it is €24.90, you will see people thinking: Should I give €27 which is tight or €28 which is more generous? Obviously more or less if the service was very good or very bad. No tip doesn'...


3

As of 2019, Zomato (formerly Urbanspoon) https://www.zomato.com is the most popular Australian review site by a mile. It covers everything from kebab joints to frou-frou five stars. The Good Food Guide https://www.goodfood.com.au/ is also worth a mention: it focuses more on high-end restaurants, but unlike the free-for-all of Zomato, the reviews are ...


2

Actually, in Bavarian we do not say "stimmt so", but we say "des basst a-so" or "des basst scho" or something alike "mach'ma 18", when rounding up to integer values (please don't ask me to explain the grammar of this assumed "we" form). There's even places, where they refuse the accept the rounded value - but return to the cent, no matter what you tell them (...


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