170

Based upon what you wrote, you are getting ripped off. It means you are the victim of a con. A UK emergency travel document is issued to British citizens only. They will never issue an emergency travel document to a foreigner. That's the job of the foreigner's country. Issuing a UK work permit (or UK visit visa) at the UK border (or airport) flat out does ...


144

The problem here is not the corporate credit card, but that you're trying to do this without a physical card. A credit card number is good enough to make a reservation, which is why the phone call works for that, but reception needs to charge a deposit on arrival and their protocol dictates that you need to hand over a physical card for this. The hotel ...


125

It is usual for hotels to put a 'block' (a deposit) on your payment card for the total amount, plus some estimated incidentials. On a credit card, this has little consequences (unless you are maxed out), but on a debit card this really takes the money out for some days. Many hotels (same for car-rentals and gas stations) have signs at the check-in where ...


116

I'm going to disagree with the other answers here, and state that the hotel didn't follow the correct procedure for charging your card, which is what has caused your problem. When you checked in, the hotel did an authorization for the $5,000. This is normal - it basically "reserves" the money so that it's there when they come to charge your card, which ...


72

Indirectly. You can give them a voucher that tells them you will buy them a plane ticket of their choosing up to a given amount. Far more personal too than simply handing some precharged card.


71

No. Since the bank is the one that has to assume the risk of unauthorized charges (by law, your liability can't be more than $50), it doesn't matter that you are "okay with taking the risk," because it's the bank's risk. The anti-fraud measures are there to protect the bank and are not optional. You might consider getting a card with a different bank, as ...


54

There are no rules that say a hotel has to refund money to already-booked patrons if they lower their prices. And you would certainly object if the hotel asked you for more money because 'prices had gone up since you booked'. Forcing hotels to refund money to customers with previous bookings would essentially mean they stopped reducing prices, because it ...


51

At point-of-sale terminals, cheque and savings transactions are processed through the domestic EFTPOS debit card system. As far as I know they only accept locally issued debit cards. Credit transactions are processed through the relevant international card scheme (Visa, Mastercard, etc). Despite its name, they accept both debit and credit cards issued ...


48

Canadian Credit Cards Many fuel dispensers in the USA (for sure in Hawaii, apparently elsewhere in the USA as well) accept the numbers-only from the postal code of a Canadian billing address followed by two zeros. So, if your Canadian billing address is right beside Schwartz's Deli in Montreal where the postal code is H2W 1L2, you would enter '21200'. ...


47

This is a fairly simple approach, but I have a couple of different cards (including ATM/debit and credit) from different banks (which also helps with ATM compatibility issues). When I travel, I take care not to keep them all in the same place. This takes some effort to ensure they're being stored securely and don't get lost, since you're moving them around ...


45

For both historical and financial reasons, American Express acceptance in France is quite low. Visa and MasterCard were associated from the start with the CB program, so anywhere they take cards they will take Visa and MasterCard, it's a standard part of the contract a merchant would get from their bank for card acceptance. On the other hand, American ...


44

I second the comment by B.Liu. Make really sure this is not a scam. I once used Western Union to send money to a relative abroad. They are still in business and so are several other providers. (Andrew mentioned Moneygram in his comment. I'm not suggesting a specific provider based on my limited transactions. Check their websites and FAQs.) Your friend ...


34

This is how they avoid taxes. In Ukraine, there's a special regulation for small businesses, called "Private Entrepreneur" (приватний підприємець or фізична особа-підприємець, abbreviated ПП or ФОП). They have simplified requirements as per bookkeeping, quarterly reports, and — most importantly — lowered taxes and/or flat tax rate (contrary to a ...


32

Try a credit union. Many of them boast surcharge-free ATMs. Lots of smaller banks don't collect surcharges either. Those that don't often will have a big sign saying so near the ATM. The Credit Union National Association, the Independent Community Bankers Association and The Co-Op Network all have ATM locators on their Web sites. Ask for cash-back when ...


30

Well first of all, as has been pointed out in comments, you will really want to trust your friend. He could run off with all of your money, not pay you back the full amount or lose the card. If all of that is no issue for you, look to your terms and conditions that you signed for the debit card. Very likely there is a clause that prohibits your from ...


30

Travelling without a credit in the US is difficult. It's almost impossible to rent a car. Some hotels will try to work with you, others will not. You may have to put down substantial amounts of cash as deposit. Many providers will simply refuse service. For example: there is a simple food truck outside of Boston's South Station that takes card only: no card?...


29

If you pay by Dollar (or home currency) The hotel will add a charge for this, hence you will be paying more. If you pay by local currency the exchange rate will be decided by the credit card company or bank. These exchange rates are much better than the hotel rates. Check this Visa page for more information regarding this service for Visa holders. AFAIK, ...


29

Yes they will work just fine. I have the chip and signature cards and I have used them abroad successfully. The merchants will just give you the receipt to sign instead of having you enter your pin. One thing I would suggest is carry a pen since for most places it will seem unusual and may take a little bit of time to get the pen that is needed to sign a ...


29

Whether you have problems or not depends on where you are and what kind of shops you like to go to. In central London where I live and work, there is no problem, it is accepted as widely as any other card. I think only my barber and butcher do not take Amex, but they both prefer cash anyway. In my daily routine of the pubs, supermarkets, restaurants, coffee ...


28

This question is from 2011 and things have improved, even in Germany. As of 2016 you can survive using credit card payments only, but there are still plenty of places that do not accept them. As a rule of thumb a credit card is more likely to be accepted if you are in a metropolitan/touristy area with hotel/supermarket/... chains for larger sums of money (...


28

First of all, it depends on why your card is retained. I can think of at least three common situations: You have entered a wrong PIN too many times. Your issuing bank has decided to cancel and retain your card, e.g. because you have exceeded your credit limit and they want to prevent you from charging the card at "offline merchants". This may of course be a ...


28

Mastercard, hands down. If you want a card to make payments abroad, your choice is between Mastercard and Visa, especially in Europe. Other cards are much less commonly accepted (and in fact quite rare there). American Express cards can be good for their perks: cash back, insurance, miles, rewards, whatever but not for convenience when travelling… You could ...


28

Tourists planning to visit the UK can actually buy a Visitor Oyster card in their home countries, if they live in one of 24 countries where local travel agents sell the cards. For instance, people in the US can visit Rail Europe or VisitBritain Shop to purchase a Visitor Oyster card before leaving. If you aren't in one of those countries, the TfL Visitor ...


28

One thing that stood out immediately to me (and it was mentioned by Gayot) is that emergency travel documents are given to citizens for travel to their country of citizenship and not to a foreign country. There are some exceptions (like refugees and asylum seekers - but these do not apply to you). I have been flown in to another country for interviews ...


28

I live in Denmark (Copenhagen), and I can go weeks without using cash these days. What I have is a 'Dankort' (national debit card system), so the experience doesn't necessarily transfer directly to foreign cards -- but the vast majority of places that accept it also take at least Visa and MasterCard. You'd need cash for bus tickets if you buy from the ...


27

In short: no. Mostly, credit card acceptance in Germany is still the exception rather than the norm. There are a couple of places, however, where you can expect at least Visa and MC to be accepted, most notably ATMs and gas stations. Be prepared to pay in cash everywhere else.


25

It doesn't disable all security checks, but there is a phrase that will eliminate the need for advance travel notifications on cards in North America. It's "Hello, AmEx? I'd like to open x card." American Express does not require travel notifications for its cards. If you call and try to give them a notification of upcoming travel, the automated system ...


24

UK Credit Cards I have a UK credit card and have had mixed results using my card at the pump. Sometimes no ZIP code is asked for and it works fine. Also, sometimes entering 00000 does work (I'm guessing because it's not subsequently using the ZIP code entered). In about 80% of cases, though (and it does seem to vary as to where in the US you are), I've had ...


24

In continental Europe, use cash, nothing else. That's a simple rule you should follow, all other discussions are a distraction. There are some differences between countries but generally speaking tipping on the credit card is highly unusual, in most countries you won't find any routine way to add a tip on the bill and many people will not know what to do if ...


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