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67

As you've got to make the journey between airports anyway, I say make the most of it. Sleep on the plane if you can and see the city at night. I'd pack in one backpack (hand luggage strapped on top) and do it on foot, but taxi/bus/night tube (Friday and Saturday) are other options. The last tube train from Heathrow is at 23:35 (T4) or 23:42 (T5), a few ...


53

Yes, it's doable. Although going through central London isn't the fastest route from Heathrow to Gatwick, you have lots of time so it's not an unreasonable route to take. You could obviously do it all by taxi, but it's also possible (and much cheaper) on public transport. You can get the underground from Heathrow to Green Park, which will take about 50 min,...


48

Having an American passport usually means you are an American citizen. As such, you can enjoy unrestricted travel in the US. The other travelers will have to be admitted to US before the start of the 23hr layover. If they are admitted, they also enjoy unrestricted travel. Remember, that there are no transit zones in US airports. Immigration checkpoint is ...


42

Here's an excerpt from Wikitravel: Although many visitors, especially Americans, may feel apprehensive about visiting Hiroshima, it is a friendly, welcoming city, with as much interest in Western culture as anywhere else in Japan. Tourists are welcomed, and exhibits related to the atomic bomb are not concerned with blame or accusations. Bear in mind, ...


37

There are no such temples in Saudi Arabia - source: 26+ years of living there. There are way more Christians in Saudi Arabia than Buddhists - but there are no churches in Saudi Arabia either. It is enshrined in the law - which states that all people are free to practice their religion in private only. Public houses of worship for other religions are not ...


36

It's definitely not the same thing. There are two 'routes'. One is along the pedestrian walkway on the bridge. Same height as the traffic and trains. (source: Wikipedia) The other is over the 'arch' of the bridge, which is the one you pay $185 for. You get safety lines, can't take anything up with you (including cameras, I gather) and you have a guide. ...


32

Very easily doable. But if you're going all that way in on the tube and aren't too tired, walk around - central London is quite small and easily walkable. You could see Tower Bridge, Tower of London, Big Ben, Trafalgar Square and Picadilly Circus - all quite photogenic and iconic, even at night!


30

WikiTravel doesn't have an article on the Gates of Hell, but WikiVoyage does. There's at least four tour companies listed. Two international and two local. You apparently can drive there but it requires a 4x4 and you'll be driving across the sand rather than on a road. They suggest that you won't be able to get there in a rental car but don't give any ...


29

Not yet open to the general public (which includes tourists I believe), but it will be starting 13 Oct 2018 (Sat) from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. From 15 Oct 2018 (Mon) onwards, it will be open from 5:00 am to 5:00 pm, except for Sundays, holidays, and market days off. Note: The tuna auctions will not be viewable to the public until 15 Jan 2019 (Tue). Details are ...


27

You should definitively go to the Computer History Museum in Mountain View and especially check out the Stackoverflow plaque in the Computer History Museum Wall. See also the Meta SO thread about it.


27

You don't indicate what time of day you will arrive and depart, but Incheon Airport offers a series of free Transit Tours of varying lengths and departing at various times of the day. The shorter tours are within the city of Incheon, which is a major city in its own right, whereas some of the longer 4- and 5-hour tours are of sights and sites in Seoul. ...


24

Painting with broad brush strokes about some very large and varied countries here, but I'd go for Japan. India I'd rule out due to the climate alone: March to May is the hot season, and it will be ferociously hot (40+ °C) in the Gangetic plains around Delhi. Of course you could head down south, but then the Taj will be off limits. And then there's the ...


24

This depends on the time of year, day of the week, holidays etc. But, generally, yes there will probably be a small queue. When I have been before it was during a week day, we arrived about 10 minutes before the bus left and there was maybe 5-10 people ahead of us, when the bus left on time it was mostly full. To be on the safe side I would include some ...


23

First I have to say that is very difficult to answer your question, because is near impossible to say "hey, this volcano will be launching lava on this dates". If you remove Hawaii from your list, I believe the only places you can see lava are: Mount Erebus: Antarctica, not very easy to reach and really difficult to climb. Has a lava lake. Erta Ale: ...


23

Summary: One should be prepared to wait for the second bus if they are visiting during school holidays, Easter being one of them. There are other options to get to the Warner Bros Studio from Watford Junction though. Why might one need the second bus - a capacity calculation According to the official booking website the allocated time slots come in half-...


22

While what constitutes a "best" spot is subjective, here are some popular options: Icho Namiki This road is located in Tokyo, between the Gaienmae and Aoyama-Itchome stations. The best time to visit is from mid-november to early december. Rikugien garden While this doesnt feature only Ginkgo trees, you can enjoy the view in this traditional japanese ...


22

If you are transferring to another city in the US via Atlanta, then yes. You are going to go through immigration in Atlanta, after which you will be landside, i.e. you have essentially left the airport. So there will be absolutely no problem for you to leave the airport and do whatever you want, regardless of whether you are an American citizen. If you are ...


21

Note that since this answer was written, night trains have almost disappeared in Western Europe. Most of the trains mentioned in this answer are no longer running and your options are much more limited. For the situation as of summer 2016, see Willeke's answer. Night train through Germany are operated by City Night Line. It may help to look at the map in ...


21

You will definitely want to visit Weird Stuff, which is an enormous warehouse of all kinds of discarded technology located in Sunnyvale. It's a bit out there, but very worth it. If you're interested in doing any archival research, you might also want to schedule an appointment with Stanford's Silicon Valley Archives.


21

A quick scan of Wikivoyage's guide to Hiroshima sights indicate that memorials and museums to the attack have English-language information. If they didn't intend non-Japanese to visit the place, they wouldn't have such information. I seriously doubt that they'd regard the USA differently from other non-Japanese countries in this context, even though the USA ...


20

It's perfectly fine. I've been to both Hiroshima and Nagasaki in my (Japanese) high school trip including multiple sessions with hibakushas. There is really no animosity in general. The emphasis of these museums and parks are solely on how horrible nuclear attacks and war is, and how we need to achieve world peace and eliminate all wars. I think most ...


20

Skirts specifically are not required, but modest dress certainly is, mostly in religious sites: churches like St. Peter's in the Vatican, major temples in Thailand and India, mosques pretty much anywhere if they're even open to visitors, etc. From the Vatican's official site: Access to Vatican Museums, Sistine Chapel, Vatican Gardens and Saint Peter's ...


19

I would work this out strategically, and look up lists like The Ten Most Active Volcanoes in the World. There are approximately 1,500 active volcanoes in the world today and 75 percent of them are located in the "Pacific Ring of Fire." On average, 50-70 volcanoes erupt every year. As the article text below provides descriptions, I've included photos along ...


19

(Sorry for the late answer) I've spent about 3 months over the course of a few trips (2 months on my first trip), and I had a list of places I wanted to see. Not all of them are 'attractions' or the usual, but nevertheless something as a geek that's been looking at the things going on in Silicon Valley from a far most of my life I wanted to see: Computer ...


19

Yes, there is! On the first Sunday of every month, almost all the main museums and art galleries are open for free. The only slight downside is that loads of people take advantage of this, so the queues can be quite long (it took 25 minutes to get into le Musée d'Orsay today mid afternoon as a guide), and they can be very busy inside. See this question on ...


18

Each person has their own taste, so this questions is almost subjective. However, after living there for four years, I now know there are certain things that EVERY tourist seems to want to do or see. St Paul's. It's one of the greatest cathedrals in Europe, and I've heard people say it's their European highlight, the pinnacle of sights that they've seen. ...


18

Below are the answers to your questions, respectively: 1) Reykjavík is a pretty nice and relaxing city. How much time you want to spend there, depends on what you like and what you want to do there. If you like going to the pubs and just relax for sometime, then I would recommend to stay for a couple of days in Reykjavík. 2) If you want to take the Route 1 ...


18

For general communist architecture I would start at Alexander Platz and walk down the 'Karl-Marx-Allee' all the way to 'Frankfurter Tor' in Friedrichshain. There is nothing super special there, but the street was used for the big parades and still has a bit of an 'East German' feeling to it. As for bunkers, there are still many around, some of them from the ...


18

IIRC, you can see some flower fields from the “Oude Lijn” so from trains going between Haarlem and Leiden (which includes some but not all trains between Amsterdam and Rotterdam). The Keukenhof is a park devoted to tulips and other flowers. It's itself located in this tulip growing area (the Bollenstreek or “bulb region”) so if you don't mind the entrance ...


17

Driving the road is 830 miles and not that hard except for the narrow roads, blind curves, etc. There are villages all around the coast of Iceland. Nytimes has a good article. Now driving in the unpopulated highlands (the desert part in the middle) means driving in areas where there are no gas stations, no farms, no towing and you may have to drive across ...


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