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131

Tipping is not at all mandatory in Germany and usually the service personnel does not rely on tips as much as in the USA, say. Usually, if you do not state the amount you want to round up to ("make it X EUR" — or "Stimmt so" if you do not expect change at all), they will start picking up coins from their purse and give you the exact amount of change ...


93

You don't need to worry about this. Bellhops are always optional. Usually when you check in at a place with bellhops, (and they really only exist in higher end hotels), a bellhop will approach you and say "Can I carry your bags?". You just say "No thanks, we'll be fine." Sometimes the bellhop will carry the bags anyway, or the receptionist will sumon the ...


91

Tipping is still the norm in any U.S. establishment where you do not seat and serve yourself—that is, everywhere except fast-food restaurants and places organized as food courts or cafeterias where you order at a counter. In buffet-style restaurants, where the server does not take your order or serve more than drinks, the standard is lower (10-15% instead of ...


86

That's easy: Tipping simply doesn't happen in Denmark. All of the places you list have posted prices that include all applicable taxes and enough profit to pay the entire staff full wages. (One example: It is common for credit-card terminals in taxis to allow you to enter a tip amount before you key in your PIN. However 19 times out of 20 the driver will ...


67

As your main reason to shy tipping is ‘being uncomfortable doing it‘, I’ve added this answer, even though it misses the question given. In sit-down restaurants, normally nobody sees you doing the tipping - it happens after you paid, and before you leave. Staff will only know the amount of your tip when you have long left (from experience, this is not known ...


63

I've only seen them in higher-end hotels. I don't understand why it will/should scare people away. It is good customer service, and some people like that. IMO, bellhops and porters are really useful when you have a lot of bags, or heavy bags (more than one per person), or if you are elderly or handicapped. They will get them out of your car or taxi, and ...


62

TL;DR Tipping is never mandatory, but most Germans do it. 5%-10% is most common, round up to a whole number, or to 50 ct if amount < 10€ Not tipping does not automatically mean that you were unsatisfied, but could be a hint. Should I tip? In general, deciding whether or how much to tip is a subject of debate in Germany as well, just as in many other ...


61

Tipping is for the service, the menu price is for the food. If the service is bad, leave a small tip. This will show the wait person that you didn't forget to tip, but felt that their service was undeserving. On the converse, it is important not to leave a poor tip if the food was bad but the service was good. The wait staff can not make the food ...


58

As a flight attendant for years, NO, no one tips flight attendants. Flight attendants are usually paid very well, and in some cases, very very well. They are usually paid per hour in addition to a basic salary and many bonuses for having layovers out of town and other stuff. Tipping them would be considered offensive and an insult in most airlines anyway. ...


52

"Inclusive of service" should mean that you are not expected to tip. That doesn't mean that you can't tip if you want to, especially if the service was good. The US restaurant business is pretty much wedded to tips, and they will be appreciated no matter what. However a Michelin 3-star restaurant should be paying its wait staff a decent wage, with or without ...


51

Tipping in the US is much more common than elsewhere. In much of the US service staff are deliberately paid very low wages and expected to make it up in tips. Remember this when comparing prices in North America and Europe - the price of a restaurant may look low, but you are going to have to pay up to 20-25% extra on it. I can't do better than recommend ...


49

Normally, the sequence is this: Get the bill from the server. Check it for any issues. Give the server your credit card. The server goes off and swipes your card, coming back with your card and the receipt. There are two copies of the receipt, one for you and one for the restaurant. Write the tip on the restaurant copy and sign it; take your copy and your ...


38

No. You don't tip unless it's a delivery charge. For example, if you order takeout food and have them deliver (especially common in hotels), then you'd want to tip the driver. From Wikipedia: Tips are also generally given for services provided in golf courses, casino, hotels, concierge, food delivery, taxis, spa and salons. If you're going to the ...


37

Since no-tipping restaurants are very rare in the U.S., your best bet is going to be to find restaurants where you are doing much of the work for yourself - counter-service restaurants, for example. There are many such restaurants in the U.S., although they veer toward the casual (most fast food restaurants are such). Fried chicken and barbecue restaurants ...


36

In my opinion Airbnb is nothing but a short-let provider. Yes people do rent out their spare rooms, and thus welcome you in their house. But they do so in exchange for money, very much like a hotel, or a bed-and-breakfast, would do. In that sense I don't think tipping is necessary. If you want to show appreciation to an excellent host, the best way to do ...


36

To slightly disagree with Henning Markholms answer, being a fellow dane. Tips will not be frowned upon, but are definitely not expected and you would not incur any dirty looks for not tipping. The tipping line is rarely used when paying with credit cards, in some cases it is actually extra work for the server, as he or she will have to get a new receipt for ...


34

There's a bit of per-country variation, but the rule of thumb across Western Europe is that service charges are already included in the bill (sometimes as a separate line item, sometimes not) and it's not necessary to tip in addition to this. If you must, and you usually wouldn't unless the service is really good, rounding up a euro or two to the nearest ...


34

First, ask for the check. If you're in a real rush and paying by card, you could hand the waiter your credit card at this point to speed up the process a bit, but the normal thing to do is to ask for the check and wait for it to brought to you. The waiter will bring you the check. Take a look and make sure everything is as expected. Let him or her know if ...


33

In the Netherlands (I live there...), most people tip by just leaving some cash on the table or by rounding up the amount on the bill or credit card slip. Amounts tend to not be steep either, there's no such thing as the "expected 15% tipping" in the US. Literally rounding up the bill to a nice round number is common. Say your bill is for 46 Euro, make it ...


33

I am uncomfortable with tipping and would much rather eat at sit-down restaurants in the United States that pay their employees fairly without expecting customers to supplement with tips (as occurs in many other countries in the world). In other words, I want to eat at restaurants that explicitly do not allow tips. You can't. That's simply not how it works ...


30

Not sure if this is quite the scenario you are outlining, but: If you're really really broke, chances are you won't be eating at restaurants or places that require tipping in the first place :) At least in the US, tipping is not the norm (or is completely optional - eg. tip jar might be present) at fast food (McD, Chipotle), sandwich shops (Subway) or other ...


29

Scandinavia (where I'm from): matches the UK as described by Rory here. If the service is really good, you can tip upwards of 5-10% if you want. But please note that most entry-level jobs like cashiers, waiters, cabdriver etc. pays a lot better in Scandinavia than in the US (or frankly, most other countries), so you're not stealing anyone's lunch by not ...


29

cdkMoose is correct in that the quality of the food should not influence your tip. However, your question appears to operate on a bit of a false premise, and I think it should also be said that leaving a small tip for poor service should be done only in exceptional circumstances. By exceptional circumstances, I mean active hostilty or extreme rudeness on ...


29

Tipping is optional in general in the UK, rather than customary. Especially in a pub food environment, it's unexpected (much more common when the bill is brought to your table), although always of course welcomed. In general if you are tipping, it is done at approximately the same time as paying. The normal way of tipping in a pub where money is exchanged ...


29

Will the man order for both or will the parties order individually? If it is a romantic/dating encounter, the man and woman confer over their choices and each makes their own selection, but then the man does the talking. The man will select the wine and propose the selection to the woman. If it is a business encounter each person talks individually to the ...


27

I will interpret your question as "is it normal practice to tip an Uber driver in London?"---otherwise it would be off topic as opinion-based. No, it is not expected to tip Uber drivers. It is also not expected to tip other kinds of taxi drivers in London, except that you might round up to the nearest convenient change if paying in cash. Your Uber driver ...


27

In general, you don't. There are exceedingly few restaurants in the U.S. where a tip is not allowed. In most parts of the country, you won't find a single one. There are some where tipping is not expected, but these will primarily only be counter-service restaurants (i.e. fast food,) not table-service restaurants with servers. Even the fast-food restaurants ...


27

I dined at Per Se last night, so I guess there's a 20% chance that you'll be dining there as well (there are only 5 three-star's in New York as of 2018). When the bill came, it was very clear that gratuity was already included. I even received a beautifully hand-written bill with no spot for additional gratuity. The staff were excellent and I have no doubt ...


25

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


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