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To avoid disturbance from small children, you can use a multi-pronged approach: first, try to choose flights that are more of a hassle for parents. Generally this means night flights - some parents may be sure their child will sleep (and not bother you) but others are worried the child will not sleep and will cry. So they take a daytime flight and are ...


214

For $160,000, you can hire a private jet for London - LAX return which is a similar trip length to that of London to San Francisco. This aircraft seats 13 making the trip approximately $12,300 each if you could find 12 other people to share it with. That's a similar price to paying for fully flexible first class. For that you typically get a private ...


186

Toddlers cannot be seated in exit rows. If you are able to select your seat, choose one that has an exit row behind it. You may lose the ability to recline your seat, but you are guaranteed that there will not be a toddler behind you.


117

So far as I can tell, there are no commercial flights that are entirely child-free, There are unlikely to be, as the economics of commercial aviation work against it—the flying public favors low fares over essentially all other considerations. Every few years there is a new column suggesting it, but in the end, people aren't really willing to pay what it ...


78

Assuming you fly with a second person, you could use a small trick to increase your level on insulation. During check-in, reserve two middle seats which are directly behind (or in front) of the exit row: Since no children can sit in the exit row and parents will want to sit next to their children, you're guaranteed to have nine child-free seats. If you're ...


77

If you have an Android phone, then there's an app called Where is public toilet. It indicates the public toilets near you, and if they are free to access or not. It works for most of Europe. Play store link. Other similar apps are available.


75

Airlines today charge for everything, including choosing your seat. If it's important, and a matter of safety, that your seat be chosen in advance, such as seating two people together, then you need to spend whatever amount the airline charges to ensure that. It's not a practical strategy to assume the charged-for service will be provided to you for free ...


62

The Thomson Select A Seat page implies that you can purchase seats together for extra money. Although you may be re-assigned and, interestingly, their definition of 'together' is: Seats together may be across an aisle or behind each other. So that may not solve the problem. That page say Thomson follows the Civil Aviation Authority guidelines, from the ...


56

Bring $20 - $50 cash. After you board, if you happen to be near a toddler, find a more preferable seat that seems to have a solo passenger in it, and make an attractive cash offer to the person who currently has that seat to switch with you. Be upfront with your reason for wanting to switch, as they will likely be suspicious otherwise.


52

According to the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, Article 3: For the purpose of assigning nationality, birth on a ship or aircraft shall amount to birth in the territory of the State that gives its flag to that ship or aircraft. However, only about 40 nations (not including the USA) have ratified this convention - and what territory ...


51

This is prohibited for safety reasons. Each row has one extra oxygen mask (there are exceptions, some rows have no extra masks and they will be marked somehow). If more than one infant is seated in a parent's lap and the oxygen masks were to be used one of the row occupants will have no oxygen mask to use. Usually the reservation system/agents will avoid ...


50

As an Iranian I can tell you that breast-feeding in public is NOT a crime (at least in Iran) and you don't need to expect any severe consequences for this. Mothers do feed their children here whenever/wherever needed and it's none of anybody's business to question them why they are feeding their children. It's however usually a good practice for breasts to ...


50

We are back from our trip and we managed to get around without too much trouble, but with a lot of planning involved. First off: It is really not an issue in airports, big city centres etc. Shopping malls and airports often have very nice spacious nursing rooms. We still did plan in advance and checked online where exactly they were located so that we didn'...


50

I have not been to London with kids but according to my experience there are plenty of public toilets available. Most parks have facilities that include a café and toilets. In the city there are toilets on most big squares. There's always a McDonald's restaurant nearby where you can go. One advise is not secret but always given: go to a museum. In many ...


47

Next time, maybe swap seats with your son? Then at least you don't have to crane your neck to check on him - he will always be in your view. As for the danger of pedophilia: the preponderance of pedophile crimes involve a trusted adult, not a stranger. Going by statistics, your family members present a danger many times greater to your son than the stranger ...


44

I have direct experience with this; not actually in flight thank goodness, but in transit. My daughter was born prematurely in Shanghai last year during a short layover between Paris and Auckland. My wife and I only had limited 48-hour transit visas for China and our flight was due to depart about 10 hours after she was admitted to hospital at the beginning ...


44

It is quite rare these days (even inside trains) for the changing tables to be in the women's section, usually they will be somewhere in between the two sections, or inside the separate large restroom with the wheelchair icon (yes, you can use it too). If you do encounter such a case, though, it's not different than elsewhere. An apology (shitsurei ...


40

It does indeed appear that your question is asking for opinions, but as an experienced cabin crewmember I can say that in this case there definitely is a best setup: The best option would be 3 + 2, the two seats are from the adjacent row, not the one behind or front: Here's why: If behind/font, it's actually harder to communicate visually, standing up is ...


38

It's complicated, but as always, Wikipedia has it covered. The short version is that in the vast majority of cases, the baby will inherit one or more citizenships from its parents through jus sanguinis, and nothing more. If the baby is born within the territorial limits of a country that applies jus soli, including flying overheard and within nautical ...


38

Some do some don't. Most larger hotel chains (Marriott, IHG, Hilton, etc.) will offer this. Typically you either get a room with two double/queen beds or a single large bed with added "rollaway" bed(s) for the kids. Rollaway is often charged extra. Pretty much every Internet hotel search engine allows you to search for 1 room/4 persons. Easy enough !


36

There's no definitive answer to this and it will vary by country and airline. This is what the UK Civil Aviation Authority says: http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=2207&pageid=12706 From a safety point of view children (it doesn't specify an age) SHOULD be seated CLOSE to their parent/guardian. The reasons are many but if you imagine a ...


33

I called a cousin who works for an airline at an airport, he explained how to do this in a very safe and efficient way. Infants do not need a seat, airline require a fraction of the price paid by the adult to be paid for the infant (~10%) or sometimes it is free. Hence, just make the reservation for you and your wife and other passengers who need seats, and ...


33

Three of our kids have taken 12-hour flights with us when they were younger than 6 months. We never had any problems, so I would take option a). Option b) has shorter flights, but still 6 hours can be eternity if your child is not fine; and I think it is very unlikely that whatever bothers him/her will last more than that. And then you have, still with the ...


33

I've been that stranger. I once surreptitiously took a photo of (native) people in a rural Swedish village who I throught were dressed funnily. A young man noticed, and responded with a gesture of moving his finger across his neck. The villagers belonged to a religious sect that prohibits photography. Another time, I took a photo of a stairs in Stockholm....


31

Before you travel - book early Make sure to book early enough so that you can get seats with access to a bassinet (travel cots). You need to call the airline directly to reserve such seats. Note that a travel cot/bassinet does not count as a seat for the baby. You'll still have to hold the kid during take-off and landing. If you do not manage to get a ...


31

Since this question is not tagged for Spain, and it is tagged for cultural-awareness and local-customs, then be aware that in some countries (including England and Wales) photography in a public place is generally unrestricted, and your principal recourse in such situations is not to go into those places, or to leave if you're getting annoyed at the ...


31

Babies and small children at the airport Did you bring your own baby food to the airport? You can have it heated in all restaurants at the airport. Our staff are happy to be of assistance. Microwave ovens are available in most of the airport restaurants.


30

There's a bunch of confusion here still, so I'll try to lay out all the steps in more detail. One note first. Airlines offer an "unaccompanied minors" service, where airline employees will escort your daughter from the time you drop her off to the time she is picked up by an authorized adult. This service is mandatory for children 15 and under on United (...


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