43

The dollar sign derives from an abbreviation for the Spanish-American peso, the currency from which the US dollar itself derives. Many countries use this sign for their currencies. Any use of the sign without further specifying the currency is therefore ambiguous, which is why ISO currency codes exist. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dollar_sign and ...


17

As someone who travelled a lot and stayed in many hostels let me say I also saw similar behaviour in many places, not only hostels but also on buses and at tourist sites. This is not limited to South America, but also happens in South East Asia and India. When speaking to Israelis who travel alone and are usually a little bit older they confirmed my ...


16

This is how we did it today: From the Puerto Iguazu (Argentina) bus station a bus of the travel company "Crucero del Norte" goes directly to the Waterfall Park on the Brazilian side. This bus leaves every 2 hours. The last bus going back again starts at 5 pm. The ride took about 45 minutes. The bus departs from the same place where it arrives. You can pay ...


13

There are some direct buses from Buenos Aires to Santiago de Chile. For example, CATA Internacional runs a daily bus, on weekdays only (Mon-Fri), which leaves at 17:00 from BA (Retiro) and arrives next day at approximately 12:30 (= duration ~19.5 hours). The price is $AR 900 / USD ~105 (semicama without service) or $AR 1050 / USD ~125 (cama ...


12

The reciprocity fee is currently US$160 for US citizens, and can now be paid online in advance via the website http://www.migraciones.gov.ar/accesibleingles/. There is a PDF guide on paying the fee available here (The entire guide is in English except for the country name of the US, which is in Spanish - "Estados Unidos") Not surprisingly, this matches the ...


12

There is a bus station in Puerto Iguazu and buses leave every hour or so for the Argentinian side of the falls and were fairly cheap. You have to pay an entrance fee for the park and can get optional boat tours of the river below the falls and above them. I did both and it was worth it. The Argentinian side has walkways and bridges that take you right out ...


11

While Ivan's answer is the most economical option, I disagree that there's not a shuttle. For inexperienced travellers who may not speak the language, there ARE taxis from both airports as well. There is also a shuttle/bus company called Manuel Tienda León. I used them. For 45-50 ARS, they'll take you to the city to just near Retiro (the main bus station ...


10

Fist of all a short disclaimer: The blue market is an unofficial market not recognized by federal authorities and changing money there is illegal. Thousands of Argentinians use this market every day as buying dollars in the official market is almost prohibited by the government . I will try to answer your question without entering into the details of the ...


10

First of all, let's talk about the place. I learned about the Welsh Settlements there while I was in Puerto Madryn, in Patagonia, Argentina. This is where they first landed, and indeed along the shorefront some of the ruins of their first dug-out homes still exist. It must have been tough. Fortunately they expanded, and the town of Gaiman is the Welsh ...


10

You can buy your tickets here. The price is about 185 USD. It's not necessary to do any special preparation, as the train will take you back to "normal" altitudes after a couple of hours at 4200m. When I was in Argentina, the train didn't work, so we had to rent a car to do more or less the same path the train makes. We stayed about 2 or 3 hours at 4000 ...


10

As with anywhere travelling, exercise a reasonable amount of precaution. La Boca has a (deserved) reputation for being one of the more dangerous areas of BA, but that does not mean you cannot safely visit there. Don't dress like a tourist, leave jewellery, big cameras at your hotel or hostel Get advice from your hotel / hostel on the safe areas to go. Don't ...


9

In Buenos Aires there are 2 airports: Aeroparque (AEP) and Ezeiza (EZE). First one is smaller and closer to the city center. If you arrive to AEP you have to take a "colectivo". It's a bus that goes from the airport to the center stopping when somebody pushes the stop button. Very easy :) When I was in Buenos Aires (2008), it cost 1$ (ARS, about 0'20 ...


9

There are 3 major carriers in Argentina Claro, Movistar and Personal All three offer prepaid cards you can buy on literally hundred of shops around the city (I am not sure were in Buenos Aires you are going, but if you are traveling to Capital Federal, then you will find shops on the streets, on every shopping mall, and big movie complex. There are some ...


9

The best options you have is looking for sail boats requiring a crew. You should be careful with that. Make sure the captain is experienced enough. Cape horn is not known by being easy. But you're aware of that probably. They will, most likely, be looking for someone with experience as well. Things can go in many ways. It's not easy to get a good crew ...


9

The Antarctic Peninsula is a part of the sector of Antarctica claimed by Argentina. If you are taking a ship that goes only there (and not to the Falkland Islands, for example), you are technically not leaving Argentina at all. I went to the Antarctic Peninsula from Ushuaia last November. The crew took my passport before I boarded the ship, and returned it ...


8

This is one of my favourite bus trips in the world, having done Mendoza->Santiago twice and Santiago->Mendoza once. Please, please, travel it during the day, for two reasons: 1) I've done this once at night. At the top of the Andes is the border crossing. There's snow a good portion of the year on the hills around you. It's FREEZING in the middle of the ...


8

Pretty dangerous. I was mugged there at gunpoint after deciding to walk in a straight direction back to town... a good anecdote but not something to repeat (in short though if you go to south America you will probably be mugged at some point). I've heard stories of youths ketteling foreigners at games outside the stadium for tickets and god knows what else.


8

Easy. For starters, there's a bus (don't take it) from Venuezuela via Lima and Santiago to Buenos Aires that I was told about while there, takes a week. But gives you an idea of the max time you might spend on buses, given you're doing a bit of tracking around. Lima to Arequipa and then Cusco can be done in 1-4 days depending on what stops you want to do. ...


8

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


8

When I travel I usually just withdraw money from an ATM. Does that mean that in this case, I should be bringing lots of USD to exchange? Yes, it means exactly that. Does it have to be USD? Do they accept Australian dollars at all? You might be able to find someone who does, but it will be much harder and the exchange rate will not be as favorable. USD ...


8

I have traveled extensively throughout Argentina, and I would have to say that the siesta (which does exist in some places) has never affected anything I wanted to do there. Within Buenos Aires, many smaller shops are closed for a siesta, but then many are not, and large ones certainly are not. Outside of Buenos Aires, the siesta may become a factor, but ...


8

Some countries have a formal invitation process that addresses maintenance and accommodation and some do not. For those that do not, it often boils down to how the person presents himself at the control point. In a lot of cases they will take the person's word for it and a letter is simply a nice-to-have. The choice is yours, and in the absence of a formal ...


8

Canal de Riego Numero Cinco links Canal Gobernador De La Serna (itself linked to Rio Paraná Mini and thence to Rio Paraná Guazu) to Arroyo (stream) Los Sauces to the west. As the crow flies about 84 – 89 km from Maltería Hudson and about 29 km from Campana, the nearest centre of population. Maltería Hudson was an Argentine malt producer owned by Cervecería y ...


7

On Brazilian side it is possible (unlike the Argentinian side) to pay with credit cards, so you don't really need to have Reals in cash. There is a bus between Puerto Iguazu (city on Argentinian side) and Foz do Iguacu (Brazilian city), and when you're in Brazil, you can take another bus to the entry to the park. It is bus No. 120 to 'Parque Nacional'.


7

~15 hours is not that long to be on the road in Argentina. ;-) You can indeed save time by flying, but if you're not in a hurry, buses are comfortable and a lot cheaper. (Especially since foreigners have to pay more than locals on Aerolíneas Argentinas, or so I've heard/read). A site called Plataforma 10* is great for checking Argentine bus timetables &...


7

If you are arriving from an international flight, you will probably land in Ezeiza (EZE). There you have two good options: Remis (car with driver): When you arrive, after the customs control, you will see a bunch of stalls selling this service. There is a flat fare to the city center of around AR$200. Some companies are cheaper than other, shop around "...


7

Not sure if this should be an answer or comment, as I've only been there during daytime... As you probably know, parts of Boca are very touristy (Caminito especially, and the stadium kind of too). Some areas of Boca, beyond Caminito, are worse security-wise: to the east and south (if I recall correctly), and especially across the water. A map in my ...


7

Part of this may depend on where you are renting the car from. For example, if you're renting in El Calafate, it's pretty common for people to take cars over the border into Chile to go to Torres del Paine. While the permits and necessary steps might vary between different car rental companies, the offices for all the car rental companies should be able to ...


7

There are regular and express ferries from Buenos Aires to Montevideo. One option goes directly to the Ciudad Vieja district of Montevideo, situated very close to downtown, with the Buquebus ferry company, and takes about three hours. Another option is the ferry+bus combination (which I've personally done in the reverse direction), which has two companies -...


7

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


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