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10

That's entirely possible. Firstly, there are no trains. Seriously. Don't bother trying to find them. In Argentina there's one from Buenos Aires to Rosario, but the bus is cheaper AND faster. There are some tourist trains in North Argentina (near Salta) and yes, there is the train from Cusco in Peru to Aguas Calientes, but that's about it. I'll discuss ...


10

The safest approach to arrive in any city is to arrange for your hotel to pick up you, meaning there will be a guy with a sign with your name on it waiting for you right outside Customs. Just give them a ring and ask about "airport transfer" or "airport shuttle service". The obvious downside is that this is usually expensive, often 2-4x the cost of a taxi.


9

I've done a tour of the Salt flats in January 2010 which is the summer down there and even then it got cold at night because it is pretty high up - 3,656 meters (11,995 ft). I did a tour with a local operator as everybody else did, there are dozens of 4x4s out there every day. The accommodation was indeed very basic, especially on the second night. We ...


7

Argentina appears to follow the common rule that you must apply for a visa at the consulate that covers the area/country where you live. Your nationality determines whether you need a visa at all or not, but once you have determined that you do need a visa, it is your residence that governs where to apply. You don't write where you live, but if you live in ...


6

You can get an international driving permit from your home country. It is no problem at all to rent motorcycles and cars with that if you have the requirement in your original driving license. While the convention says that you should have your original driving license available I never have done that (could be lost) and I have been never asked for that. So ...


6

So there are two options. 1) You're planning on doing a Salt Flats tour, if you're going to Uyuni? Most of these run from Uyuni to San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, or vice versa, and take 3ish days. It's well worth it and you should consider that if you haven't already, as it'll make the next part really easy. Once you're in San Pedro, there are buses over ...


6

It's actually longer than 24 hours. The most common route is from La Paz through to Iquique, and then down to Santiago. The Santiago->Iquique leg alone takes 24 hours. I can recommend either Pullman (we used them for that) or Tur Bus (used them for other shorter trips). I blogged about it as well. From Iquique to La Paz it took us 16 hours. However, ...


6

Short answer: You really can't. Long answer: The most direct way (ie not taking a Potosi bus and connecting) is to take just two buses. The first bus will be from Uyuni to La Paz. This can take 12-15 hours depending on the time of day, the bus company, your driver (some will pull over for a few hours to sleep!) and stops (some stop in El Alto to drop off ...


6

Bolivian Visa for Indian Citizens As an Indian citizen you need a visa to Enter Bolivia. When you arrive by plane to La Paz you can get a visa on arrival for a fee (~100USD at the time of writing). Quoting from the linked website: National India (IN) /Destination Bolivia (BO) Bolivia (BO) [...] Visa required, except for ...


5

No for both countries: Peru: With a few exceptions (notably some Asian, African and communist countries), visas are not required for travelers entering Peru. Tourists are permitted a 30- to 90-day stay, which is stamped into their passports and onto a tourist card, called a Tarjeta Andina de Migración (Andean Immigration Card), that you must ...


5

It will depend on how much time you have. Salar de Uyuni is HUGE (10,582 square kilometers), and not only you will need time to get there, but also to see the many different facets of it. Still, it is possible to visit it from Chile if you have enough time. You can get a train from Avaroa on the Chilean border, but keep in mind the schedule is not exactly ...


5

For most travellers, there's really only one logical way - the bus. The airport is 50km away in Juliaca, and generally you fly from Lima. I did this trip by bus back in 2010 - the 'fast' option around the lake, and you can read my brief bit about it on my blog. From the Article on Wikivoyage: Daily buses depart to and from La Paz, Bolivia on two ...


5

I also started in Uyuni, on a standard three day tour you spend the first day on the salt lake, getting off it in the evening, then going further south the second day visiting various lakes and rock formations, the third day you are going back to Uyuni. If you want to go to San Pedro you are dropped off at the border to Chile in the morning of the third day,...


5

I live here in Bolivia (Tarija). First of all you should never fly into La Paz. Santa Cruz is the better option as they are less likely to steal your stuff when you go through customs. As far as staying in the airport, if you are not waiting for a layover then by all means take a taxi to your hotel. I would suggest that you have your hotel pick you up as ...


4

As far as I know there are no passenger trains in the north of Chile and certainly not all the way to La Paz. The only trains in Chile run south of Santiago to Talca. The train station in Antofagasta looks like it has not been used in many years. Your information must be very old. Buses are your only choice on the ground, unless you drive yourself.


4

Trains exist in Bolivia but are quite rare. In fact, so rare that asking several travel agencies they all said that no train services were available, yet once in a while I met someone who just arrived by train! Actually considering one of my hotels a few months ago faced the passenger train station in Uyuni, I can say that it does exist. Only for your ...


4

Long-distance buses connect Puno to La Paz, some of them are really comfortable (buses from Peru are generally better than Bolivian ones). There are two things you can't miss when connecting those cities, so I'd recommend you make at least one stop in the middle. There are plenty of connecting buses, so it shouldn't be a problem. Copacabana is one of the ...


4

Unfortunately, I don't think there's many options in Uyuni for accommodation. I slept in the same place Peter mentions, and I was honestly anxious when it began to get colder and colder outside. The 'common area' was fine though, the tour guides (a really nice couple) gave us some sleeping bags and there were also blankets in the room. It might be because ...


4

None is completely reliable in that part of the world. Bring plenty of patience and plan a good amount of time between bus arrivals and departures. The La Paz - Uyuni segment is the roughest. While you can do half (Potosi-Uyuni) on train which is more comfortable, it makes logistics more complicated. Train cancellations are common and so are bus ones but at ...


4

No each of these countries has a different set of carriers. Even where the name is similar such as Claro Peru and Claro Argentina the SIM chips do not work on each others networks. However the solution is simple. Just buy a cheap unlocked phone here (most phones in South America that I have seen have been unlocked) and buy a new pre-paid SIM chip in each ...


4

If your objective is to get to San Pedro, it makes sense to do an Uyuni to San Pedro tour, instead of doing an Uyuni to Uyuni tour, followed by a trip to San Pedro. Both are readily available from plenty of tourist agencies in Uyuni. There is no public transport from Uyuni to San Pedro (besides the multi-day tours). You would have to first take a bus from ...


4

Very easy. There are tours in both directions - I went from San Pedro to Uyuni, and they go back as well. You join up to a 2 night tour, for example, and then it finishes in San Pedro de Atacama itself - and the town is tiny, so you can walk from one side to the other very simply. I went with Tierra Mystica, and aside from claiming to have an English ...


4

I managed to contact them through their Facebook page. They say: the provided service and checked baggage is the same, no matter which the fare is, as we mentioned earlier, the only difference between fares is the percentage of discount in the fare. So it seems to be "pick your own discount" type of thing. It really is puzzling to me as to why would ...


4

This is not quite easy to answer canonically. I've lived in Brazil for the last five years and have seen much of the continent, traveling quite a bit by long distance bus. I've never had an issue with long distance bus robberies, and have never spoken to anyone who's had. I am aware of robberies on local busses in Brazil, some occurrences of which you can ...


4

Have entered Bolivia twice by bus from Chile, and left once by bus (to Peru). Every time at the border (once it opened), every single passenger was required to disembark and go through immigration. One possible reason is that they have rest breaks and multiple stops as well, meaning if you were trying to 'sneak' into Bolivia, you'd have a chance. ...


4

Renting just books is unlikely, although there's no reason why if that were a frequent request. Definitely, having rain boots to visit Uyuni is a good idea if during the rainy season. Although personally I went during that season, that year they were experiencing a drought, so it was quite dry! Buying daily items in Bolivia is very cheap, so it is possible ...


3

I don't think you will have any problems with theft in the buses. They are used by either tourists or people working (and I honestly suggest you keep an eye on tourists!). But don't expect comfortable and 100% reliable buses with air con and snacks. Buses from Peru and Chile are usually better than Bolivian ones, and around La Paz there are quite alright. ...


3

You pretty much will have to go on a tour. It's through a national park area, and in addition to that, requires extensive knowledge of the area - there aren't many roads as such. So you'll go on a tour, and they'll guide you through the border. So in that regards, yes, it's very easy. You join a tour, and follow their instructions :) I can recommend ...


3

The nearest airport, UYU, is a domestic airport; you will need to connect at La Paz (LPB). Amaszonas and TAM offer UYU-LPB services. Arequipa, for its part, has limited international service, and you would need to connect on a LAN or TACA flight through Lima (LIM).


3

By bus, the easiest is going to be a stop in La Paz, Bolivia. You have two options from Puno. The direct - through the border and round the south side of Lake Titicaca to La Paz. It doesn't take that long - about 5 hours from memory, although I've heard it can take 8. Option B is the ferry through to Copacobana. It's meant to be quite the experience, but ...


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