18

Try different apps It is never good to rely on one single source of information. To verify the quality of GMaps transport info, try the same route with one or two different apps. I usually prefer an app called Moovit - I have made good experiences all around Europe with this app. Another angle is to research the local public transport company, as Joren ...


11

While MJeffryes has provided a good map to help in the general case, I'd like to answer your specific case. There isn't really a good route entirely by rail or tube. However, I can spot a few decent-looking routes if you're willing to go for a longish walk or a short-to-medium cycle (I'm not a cyclist myself so don't know precisely how cycle times correlate ...


11

Just try to build a route from railway station to your hotel, from airport to city center, etc. If some of these return results that look legitimate (i.e. not "one intercity bus per day" as noted above), you can expect that it's OK overall. I think that coverage is usually hit or miss. If smoke test fails, maybe it's worth checking if there are local ...


10

Here is a quick sniff test that will tell that information is not available for this city. When you mouse over a public transport stop, you can sometimes see a list of lines that serve this stop. Here is an example with Paris Gare du Nord: Note the colored lines 26, 39, 43, 45 and 54 serving this station. If you click on the stop itself, more details will ...


10

Uh oh. The risk of using mapping apps for everything is you can lose the craft of how to do it "the old fashioned way". Of course, it's not quite the old fashioned way; just as if pilots needed to stick-fly a 787, they would rely on navigational charts and Jeppeson books on their iPads instead of carrying 20 pounds of books. We don't need to collect ...


9

Non-folding bikes are only allowed on some parts of the tube. Tfl provides this map of the tube network, showing where bikes are allowed, subject to the hours you mentioned. Bikes are allowed outside peak hours anywhere on sub-surface lines (The Circle, Hammersmith & City, Metropolitan and District lines). All the remaining, deep level lines have some ...


9

Train travel is essentially anonymous. If you buy a ticket at a manned ticket counter, or from a ticket vending machine you will not be asked to show an ID, nor will you be required to show an ID when boarding a train. The railways do not care who travels on their trains. Trains do not have passenger manifests. They do care that everyone on their trains ...


8

An approach that has worked for me on several occasions is to start by searching for bespoke advice for a similar route. Many POIs like hotels, attractions and airports have on their website advice on "how to get to us from [insert other popular direction here]". Even if I'm actually going to some really obscure address, if I can find a hotel in the same ...


7

I live in Bogota. Let me start with your statements. after arrival at the BOG airport, I must take a green connector bus, which is free. There is no option to buy a TransMilenio card at the airport. using the connector, I will come to a normal bus station most larger bus stations are in the middle of the street, as many buses have dedicated lanes in most ...


5

As Midavalo noted in a comment, Google doesn't have complete data for all public transit systems everywhere. To know if Google has enough data to construct a route for you, you can click on a bus, metro or tram stop, if it appears on the map at all, and look for "See departure board". For instance, if you click on the bus stop icon at the airport terminal ...


5

How can I get a photo for this card? Train stations and some large metro stations will usually have a Photomaton machine (more details on this page). Google Maps lists a number of locations that have them. Go into the machine, pay 6€, and take your photo. It will print (the machine I used gave me two photos), you can cut (or rip, if you don't mind jagged ...


5

There may be police checks at any point, but there is no routine need to prove identity on most intra-EU trains. (Note temporary exceptions to this may include trains between Italy and France, Denmark and Sweden, and German print-at-home tickets do require ID.)


4

I'm not sure why you don't want to ride it all, so this explores your options in case you do choose to ride. You can use the same tools to check out routes if you want to ride part of the way. Cyclestreets is a good route-planning tool for unfamiliar bits of the UK. They offer a range of route: fast, balanced, or quiet. There's no such thing as a quiet ...


4

It all depends on where you want to go. It's arguable that Tel Aviv and Jerusalem have the best transportation in Israel, but more importantly, these cities, especially the more popular and touristy parts of them are a nightmare to drive in. My advice would be to not take a car for your stay in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv. It also depends on where you want to go ...


4

I don't think there's a direct bus from Sao Paulo to Tiradentes. Bus company Util provides several connections each day, most overnight, between Sao Paulo (Tiete) and Sao Joao del Rei, starting at 112 BRL and taking about nine hours. From there, you should be able to get a local bus to Tiradentes. You might get lucky with a Blablacar, but don't count on it....


3

What I've found so far (most links are in Hungarian): There's a map on the track's website that lists suggested directions. This is from 2016, but Volan's website (long-distance bus/coach company) approves this, these bus lines still exist. So you can use Volan's 321 line from Újpest Városkapu (also, station on the "blue" metro line M3). This uses M3 ...


3

The Shuttle is located at poor locations for transfers to the numbered lines at both ends but is much shallower depth wise. This has to do with the history of the line, and results in a long but flat walk in Grand Central and a connection to the 2/3 requiring differences in elevation. The 7's elevators at Grand Central are out of service as of December ...


3

On this page it explains that some services require a "Premium Pass" Trips that include the COASTER or Rapid Express require a Premium Regional Day Pass I'm picking that the standard Regional Pass does not include the COASTER or Rapid Express. Additionally, from this page What is the difference between the Regional and Premium Regional passes? ...


2

For the specific case of Toulouse, tisseo (Public transport in Toulouse agglomeration) is using an open source platform for itinerary, routes display and such. Google approched them to include the public transports in google maps, but, if I remember correctly, they wanted tisseo to change their architecture to the google environment. This was a few years ...


1

Leganes Central station (near the University) is on Cercanías Line C5 and Madrid Metro Line 12. In this case, Cercanías Line C5 runs every 10 minutes and journey time to Atocha station (no transfers) in downtown(ish) Madrid is about 20 minutes according to Google Maps. Since public transportation is integrated, the pass should cover this. The metro line ...


1

Google Maps relies on data made available by transit operators and some operators make this time table data available to the public. You could try searching for "General Transit Feed Specification" or "GFTS" and the city you are interested in. If you find something that looks good (i.e. it's hosted by an official web site of the operator, local government ...


1

I usually try to get the specific application for a city (or country) and never rely on Google Maps for public transport (I do rely a lot on GM for general mapping and driving). As an example, in the case of France that would be Vianavigo for the Paris region, JakDojade for several regions of Poland, etc. (to take recent cases)


1

You seem to be correct, wanting to go from the Toulouse Airport to Toulouse train station doesn't give alot of options, only 1 a day. It's not even a public transport bus. By example, from Paris airport Charles de Gaulle to train station Paris Nord gives way more results. My suggestion would be to open google maps before you leave on a trip to see what ...


1

Rome2Rio also agrees - taxi is looking like your only option, unless you hitch, perhaps? Consider seeing if others at the hostel also want to join in on a trip, and it may help cut down the costs. Or see if your hostel staff will drive you - for say, half the price of a taxi, maybe, if you can barter it down.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible