5

Having done this a couple times I can say that your passport will be stamped twice: once for entry and once for exit. In general, the two immigration checks - Argentinian and Uruguayan - are back to back so the likelihood of missing out on a stamp is fairly low.


4

Generally, when travelling on days of major celebrations, it is hard to estimate the level of celebrations that may take place in transit hubs such as bus stations or airports. Halloween, while it is celebrated in much of Uruguay and Argentina similarly to the United States, is still not considered a major holiday, which reduces the possibility of any forms ...


4

From this answer by the Buquebus company Buenos días Maria, tenemos WIFI sin costo en la terminal de Puerto Madero. Saludos. Which translates to: yes there is free wifi.


3

In normal times (the cited TripAdvisor answer is undated), yes. Because of the Argentinian border shutdown, however, the Buquebus service is now suspended and the Buquebus terminals closed to public access. Source (in Spanish): Buquebus Announcement


3

I am from Buenos Aires. It was always very simple to change foreign currency in the city of Buenos Aires. I recommend that you visit Florida Street, where you can find several "Arbolitos" that you exchange foreign money. (Euros, dollars and reais) with total normality


2

No it isn't possible. You will have to provide a national identity document (DNI) with a minimum validity of 12 months and also have to provide a tax id (CUIL). Even with all of that mentioned above, most banks still won't accept you as customer because of internal policies. Source: trust me dude, I made it after lots of blood, sweat and tears.


2

I don't think so. This terminal is indeed structured like an airport, with check-in and stuff, but there is fewer hassles - not that much of security theatre, boarding is faster, boats don't need time to steer around like planes do, etc. I think 45 minutes is more than enough to board the ship, I don't think they are leaving without you.


2

The entire Subte network (sans the Premetro Light Rail and Urquiza Line + various train yards) is underground, so there are no major elevated portions of the network. If you are visiting to see elevated stations, I believe some of the commuter rail lines just underwent considerable grade separation projects, but those are technically not part of the Subte.


1

Just sharing my experience: some friends of mine of myself took the Buquebus boat service from Buenos Aires to Montevideo, then back from Montevideo to Buenos Aires on the same day in early January 2020. None of us received an Uruguayan stamp on their passport upon passing the Uruguayan immigration (we went through 2 Uruguayan immigration officers) at the ...


1

While some people in Argentina, mostly upper middle class, are starting to celebrate Halloween, it isn't not celebrated massively by any means. It's not mentioned at school, and you will not see people dressed up. If you put your kids in costume and start knocking doors at random for trick-or-treating, no one will know what you are doing, you will get no ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible