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17

Let's say money is the only factor here, and then indeed, you may be fine with it. That's still a bit of cash for others. However, if anything eventuates that you need a clean record for - remember, they'll have a record of this. You want a permanent visa? Odds are that's a black mark against your application. Background check? Another issue. Further to ...


16

My recent experiences trying out different ATMS (around Rancagua) are the following: Banco BICE: 2500clp (though these seem to be few and far between) Scotiabank: 3500clp Banco Estado: 4000clp (they didn't charge anything extra a few months ago, but now I've tried several and they all want 4000) :-( BBVA: 4100clp BCI: 4738clp CorpBanca / Itaú: 3000 5000clp ...


15

Lonely Planet has information on this. There are flights from/to Santiago and from/to Papeete. Some people choose this connection just to travel between France and Tahiti by avoiding annoyances of a transit through the USA. Lan Airlines (100-920; Av Atamu Tekena s/n; 9am-4:30pm Mon-Fri & 9am-12:30pm Sat), near Av Pont, is the only airline serving ...


15

This was covered in the early 20th century by some other laws, but in 1961, the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs was established by the UN and as of May 2013, the Single Convention has 184 state parties. The Holy See plus all members of the UN are state parties, with the exception of Afghanistan, Chad, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Nauru, Samoa,...


13

There are some direct buses from Buenos Aires to Santiago de Chile. For example, CATA Internacional runs a daily bus, on weekdays only (Mon-Fri), which leaves at 17:00 from BA (Retiro) and arrives next day at approximately 12:30 (= duration ~19.5 hours). The price is $AR 900 / USD ~105 (semicama without service) or $AR 1050 / USD ~125 (cama ...


12

I was back-packing in Latin America for 20 months and took my camera everywhere. But it was only a 400 dollar point and shot which fits in my trouser pocket. I used that camera everywhere maybe except inside the favelas in Brazil. Some friends of mine had bigger SLRs with them and used them a lot too. In Bolivia I met a guy who was there for National ...


10

That's entirely possible. Firstly, there are no trains. Seriously. Don't bother trying to find them. In Argentina there's one from Buenos Aires to Rosario, but the bus is cheaper AND faster. There are some tourist trains in North Argentina (near Salta) and yes, there is the train from Cusco in Peru to Aguas Calientes, but that's about it. I'll discuss ...


9

According to Busbud there are three companies that offer routes from Asuncion to Santiago. NSA, Pullman Del Sur (can recommend), and Brujula. What I'd suggest instead is if you have time, stopping in Foz de Iguazu (for the Iguazu Falls), and in either Buenos Aires if you're detouring, or Mendoza, just before the mountains. I highly recommend Mendoza - ...


9

I don't really consider this a short trip, not compared to the flight. The only real ground transport option in South America is the bus (coach). There are some domestic trains around the big cities on the eastern coast, but for most rides you have to take a bus. I took a bus from Salta in Northern Argentina to Asunción and that took about 24 hours (...


9

The end of most major bus lines from Santiago is in Puerto Montt, from there people usually take the Navimag ferry to go further south, for example to Puerto Natales where there is another road. This is not a short ferry, more a cruise ship and takes four days. The other option is to go to Chiloé island which is south-west of Puerto Montt, There are several ...


9

The best options you have is looking for sail boats requiring a crew. You should be careful with that. Make sure the captain is experienced enough. Cape horn is not known by being easy. But you're aware of that probably. They will, most likely, be looking for someone with experience as well. Things can go in many ways. It's not easy to get a good crew ...


9

I'm currently in Chile and have withdrawn money on several occasions. So far, once I've aborted my withdrawal because the machine told me it was going to charge for my withdrawal. This, while, later, an ATM from the same bank did not charge. I've tried with 3 or 4 different banks. This suggests to me that ATM withdrawal fees depend not on the bank, but on ...


8

A good question, and yes, you are correct. A few things to understand: The Entry Reciprocity Fee is ONLY charged at SCL. It applies (differently) to citizens of Albania, Australia, Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Other citizens don't have to pay. (Yay for the Kiwi passport!) The receipt for payment of the reciprocity fee is attached to your ...


8

This is one of my favourite bus trips in the world, having done Mendoza->Santiago twice and Santiago->Mendoza once. Please, please, travel it during the day, for two reasons: 1) I've done this once at night. At the top of the Andes is the border crossing. There's snow a good portion of the year on the hills around you. It's FREEZING in the middle of the ...


8

There are other ferry companies operating in the area. A thorough search of Google should find these. Also, consider investing in a quality guide book like the ones from Rough Guides. When we travelled the length of Chile in 2003, we decided to ferry from Puerto Montt to Chaiten and then we went with buses down the Carretera Austral to Coyhaique and from ...


8

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


8

According to JustLanded.com: The opening hours for banks in Chile are from Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. On national holidays and December 31st, banks are closed. So the answer is December 30st for 2016 or whatever is the last non-weekend day before December 31st for other years.


7

In January 2011 we took a bus down to Puerto Montt. There was no continuous road to go south further due to a volcano that destroyed the road. We continued the trip with a bus to Chiloe Island (over a ferry), spent a fews days on Chiloe, then took the ferry at Quellon to Puerto Aisen. About 24h on the boat. From there we were quickly at Coihaique in about 1 ...


7

There are bus lines from Santiago to Puerto Montt (Tur-Bus), from Puerto Montt to Puerto Natales (mentioned at Torres del Paine site and on a french forum) and from Puerto Natales to Punta Arenas (Buses Fernández, Bus-Sur). From there, a bus goes to Ushuaia with a ferry crossing the Straight of Magellan but its route goes north then crosses the border to ...


7

Just by looking at the map (I've spent some time in Chile but missed that), it looks like Iquique would be the most obvious starting place. A city with 166,000 people in 2002 and beaches has of course tourist tours.


7

A group of us went to Chile back in 2010, and one of my friends split off from us to visit it for a few days. It's only open one weekend a month, from memory, but he thought it was brilliant, and if I return to Chile I'd be very keen to try and get there. At the time, he had tried written/online contacts, but eventually called them from when we were in an ...


7

Part of this may depend on where you are renting the car from. For example, if you're renting in El Calafate, it's pretty common for people to take cars over the border into Chile to go to Torres del Paine. While the permits and necessary steps might vary between different car rental companies, the offices for all the car rental companies should be able to ...


7

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


7

Your best bet is on a site like findacrew. I've had a friend do it this way - she overlanded from London to NZ, and used findacrew for the ocean parts inbetween. Generally there are categories of sailors on it - from beginner to expert, and as you've mentioned, you're already skilled. This will give you a considerable advantage. Thinking about it, ...


6

I spent 3 weeks in Peru last year, mostly in Lima, Cusco and the Sacred Valley, and Colca Canyon and Arequipa. Among our fancier possessions, I had a Canon camera with me and my husband had an Asus laptop. We're not physically intimidating people by any means (I'm just 5'2"), but I think we also carry ourselves confidently when we travel (e.g. no looking at ...


6

It's actually longer than 24 hours. The most common route is from La Paz through to Iquique, and then down to Santiago. The Santiago->Iquique leg alone takes 24 hours. I can recommend either Pullman (we used them for that) or Tur Bus (used them for other shorter trips). I blogged about it as well. From Iquique to La Paz it took us 16 hours. However, ...


6

Edit: Note that the reciprocity fee has been removed for US citizens - see Is there still reciprocity fee at Chile airport entry for US citizens? (after US Visa waiver) for more details. Original answer, still correct for citizens of some countries : Officially I believe the fee is payable no matter how you enter the country, however the simple truth is ...


6

I have not been to Chile, and I do speak Spanish. But let me offer some general advice on traveling in countries where you don't speak the language: How effectively you can communicate is largely up to you. There likely are exceptions in some parts of the world, but in most places, people are happy to try to communicate with you. Most "necessary" ...


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