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17

Let's say money is the only factor here, and then indeed, you may be fine with it. That's still a bit of cash for others. However, if anything eventuates that you need a clean record for - remember, they'll have a record of this. You want a permanent visa? Odds are that's a black mark against your application. Background check? Another issue. Further to ...


16

My recent experiences trying out different ATMS (around Rancagua) are the following: Banco BICE: 2500clp (though these seem to be few and far between) Scotiabank: 3500clp Banco Estado: 4000clp (they didn't charge anything extra a few months ago, but now I've tried several and they all want 4000) :-( BBVA: 4100clp BCI: 4738clp CorpBanca / Itaú: 3000 5000clp ...


15

This was covered in the early 20th century by some other laws, but in 1961, the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs was established by the UN and as of May 2013, the Single Convention has 184 state parties. The Holy See plus all members of the UN are state parties, with the exception of Afghanistan, Chad, East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, Kiribati, Nauru, Samoa,...


9

The best options you have is looking for sail boats requiring a crew. You should be careful with that. Make sure the captain is experienced enough. Cape horn is not known by being easy. But you're aware of that probably. They will, most likely, be looking for someone with experience as well. Things can go in many ways. It's not easy to get a good crew ...


9

I'm currently in Chile and have withdrawn money on several occasions. So far, once I've aborted my withdrawal because the machine told me it was going to charge for my withdrawal. This, while, later, an ATM from the same bank did not charge. I've tried with 3 or 4 different banks. This suggests to me that ATM withdrawal fees depend not on the bank, but on ...


8

There are other ferry companies operating in the area. A thorough search of Google should find these. Also, consider investing in a quality guide book like the ones from Rough Guides. When we travelled the length of Chile in 2003, we decided to ferry from Puerto Montt to Chaiten and then we went with buses down the Carretera Austral to Coyhaique and from ...


8

I have not been to Chile, and I do speak Spanish. But let me offer some general advice on traveling in countries where you don't speak the language: How effectively you can communicate is largely up to you. There likely are exceptions in some parts of the world, but in most places, people are happy to try to communicate with you. Most "necessary" ...


8

As always, Wikipedia has a good list which can answer this question. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country which has info, specs, and pictures for each plug type by country. It looks like Chile and Argentina have different mains plug types and you may only need an adapter for Argentina.


8

I hope someone with more experience can come along with a better answer, but since this is happening to you now I can cut/paste the official advice from the government there You must replace your tourist card if it has been lost or stolen. You are required to surrender the tourist card to International Police officers at the time you exit Chile. If not, ...


8

According to JustLanded.com: The opening hours for banks in Chile are from Monday to Friday, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. On national holidays and December 31st, banks are closed. So the answer is December 30st for 2016 or whatever is the last non-weekend day before December 31st for other years.


7

A group of us went to Chile back in 2010, and one of my friends split off from us to visit it for a few days. It's only open one weekend a month, from memory, but he thought it was brilliant, and if I return to Chile I'd be very keen to try and get there. At the time, he had tried written/online contacts, but eventually called them from when we were in an ...


7

Part of this may depend on where you are renting the car from. For example, if you're renting in El Calafate, it's pretty common for people to take cars over the border into Chile to go to Torres del Paine. While the permits and necessary steps might vary between different car rental companies, the offices for all the car rental companies should be able to ...


7

In Chile, ungrounded plugs are compatible with Europlugs, so you should be able to use the Swiss plug directly. Some sockets only accept grounded plugs, which have a round grounding pin directly between the two round power pins. Apparently similar plugs are used in Italy, but I had never seen an adapter for it before I came to Chile. I have no recollection ...


7

Your best bet is on a site like findacrew. I've had a friend do it this way - she overlanded from London to NZ, and used findacrew for the ocean parts inbetween. Generally there are categories of sailors on it - from beginner to expert, and as you've mentioned, you're already skilled. This will give you a considerable advantage. Thinking about it, ...


7

The bottleneck isn't the WiFi, but the connection between the island and the rest of the world. I develop an Internet-enabled product and we have a client on Easter Island. I'm given to understand that the entire island shares the equivalent of a 3G connection. I don't recall exact figures from our network logs for latency and throughput, but they're pretty ...


6

I spent 3 weeks in Peru last year, mostly in Lima, Cusco and the Sacred Valley, and Colca Canyon and Arequipa. Among our fancier possessions, I had a Canon camera with me and my husband had an Asus laptop. We're not physically intimidating people by any means (I'm just 5'2"), but I think we also carry ourselves confidently when we travel (e.g. no looking at ...


6

Update 26 December 2014 I went to the PDI in Eleutiero Ramirez this morning, it's exactly where you say it is except it's three pretty long blocks from Avenida O´Higgins down San Francisco. The routine at the PDI is now that you go to the separate entrance to the right of the main steps which is a hellish hall full of people desperate to engage with the ...


6

I lost my PDI tourist form while fishing in Patagonia. Flew out of Chile from Santiago on 2/21. At exit, gave PDI officer in booth my passport and airline boarding pass. My pp showed prior visits to Chile(3). He asked a few basic Qs, but did not even mention the missing PDI form. Wished me well and on my way. My friend, who had his PDI form, noticed it was ...


6

Yes, you can do that and there should be no problems. Neither US nor UK citizens need a visa for Chile and the reciprocity fee that used to be charged to US citizens was abolished earlier this year. My personal recommendation: definitely visit Cerro Santa Lucía, a hill park in the city center from whose top you have a great view.


6

Like in some other countries, this RUT identifier is only for tax purposes, including VAT. There is little information in English on how the system works precisely, but this RUT number field on the bus reservation system is intended at Chilean tax payers. VAT/sales tax is collected on sales between businesses (compared to some countries charging it only to ...


6

According to Horario de Buses the bus terminal is called "Terminal Rodoviario de Valparaíso" and the Google Maps insert calls it "Copropietarios Terminal Rodoviarío de Valparaíso". Romani Buses calls it "Ag.Terminal Valparaiso". It seems the correct address is Av. Pedro Montt 2831, Valparaiso, Región de Valparaíso Which looks to be right next to Google ...


6

I'm a German, living in Chile and extended my tourist visa several times in the past, the last time in January this year. This information is based on my personal experience. In short: Yes, you can extend your tourist visa for 90 more days for a fee of 100 US$. In detail: It is possible to extend your tourist visa once for another 90 days. To do so you have ...


6

I was in the airport on Easter Island in August of 2015. The only airline counter there is LAN (LATAM). No other airlines have any facilities. LAN offers daily flights from Santiago and weekly (some web sites say twice a week) from Tahiti. These are your only options. The Wikipedia page for the airport says there is seasonal service (also by LAN) from Lima ...


5

I also started in Uyuni, on a standard three day tour you spend the first day on the salt lake, getting off it in the evening, then going further south the second day visiting various lakes and rock formations, the third day you are going back to Uyuni. If you want to go to San Pedro you are dropped off at the border to Chile in the morning of the third day,...


5

It will depend on how much time you have. Salar de Uyuni is HUGE (10,582 square kilometers), and not only you will need time to get there, but also to see the many different facets of it. Still, it is possible to visit it from Chile if you have enough time. You can get a train from Avaroa on the Chilean border, but keep in mind the schedule is not exactly ...


5

The Costanera Center is the best future bet for such facilities. The tower itself is still under construction. It will be 300 meters high and South Amarica's tallest building. It seems likely that it will at least have an observation platform of some kind. Currently available are several apartment hotels with rooftop swimming pools and lounges. You would of ...


5

There are buses. At the very least, you can get a bus 1.5 hours west to Calama, which has a bigger exchange. A member of our party did that in August (winter) and got to Antofagasta, Iquique and more. The bus companies in Chile/Bolivia don't have much online presence - it's far easier to just get one in the town - but go as early as possible when you know ...


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