45

Technically no, practically speaking yes. Many of the coins look the same as US coins at a first glance, so careless clerks may accept them. I am in the US and often find myself with Canadian pennies and quarters which are very similar to the US counterparts. Having all the new coins in the US in recent years makes it even harder for people to tell the ...


44

Transaction was written as the opposite of what happened This transaction is written up as the opposite of what you describe. It's written as them selling 50,000 yen to you for $537.93 plus the $9.95 "service charge"1, for a total of $547.88, with you tendering $547.88. This was caused by an error in how the teller processed the transaction. The teller ...


42

No, GBP can not be used directly in Austria. No store will accept them. You won't have any serious trouble finding a currency exchange store to convert them to Euros though.


39

Stores They are practically very rarely accepted. Not sure about how legal that is, but some stores even explicitly put signs they don't accept 500 EUR bills. e.g. like this one (although this one is not from Spain): Banks For banks - I would be surprised if private banks where you don't have account, would go for breaking 500 into five 100s for you. ...


38

Yes you can. Unlike other countries, including the UK, US banknotes are never "withdrawn" and remain legal currency across the world however old they are (but you wouldn't want to spend the older ones as they are worth more than their face value as collectors items). In the UK you can exchange them at most high street banks (NatWest, HSBC, Lloyds etc), any ...


37

Pay as you normally do at home. Have some cash with you when you land in Greece for small immediate purchases (tourist things, taxi...), I'd say, 200, 300 euros per person. Pay with credit card for larger purchases (hotel, restaurants, train/boat reservations...). ATM are (should be) available pretty much everywhere to get cash. Prefer using Bank ATM over "...


35

Source You can exchange unlimited amounts of DM banknotes and coins for euro indefinitely and free of charge at all Deutsche Bundesbank branches. The official exchange rate is set at EUR 1 for DEM 1.95583. We accept the following banknotes and coins for exchange. Banknotes issued by the Bank deutscher Länder (BdL) Bundesbank banknotes ...


35

If you select the local currency, it will be converted to your card's currency according to the terms of your cardholder agreement (e.g. in the US and Canada it's often Visa/Mastercard's current rate + 2.5%, or possibly less for some fancy cards with annual fees). Some cards may add a per-transaction fixed fee on top of that. If you select your card's ...


34

Thomas Exchange will change almost any currency into Sterling - including the Mongolian, Kazakhestan, Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan, Armenian and Georgian currencies, and many other obscure currencies and even pre-Euro currencies such as French Francs, Italian Lira, etc. We do not charge any additional fees and our rates are always better than the Post Office, ...


34

500€ banknotes are perfectly legal in EU, and as such they are accepted all over the EU. They are however been used a lot for criminal activities, so it's been decided that they will be faded out before the end of 2018; they were used a lot in Spain, especially, and on the opposite they now quite disappeared. But this has nothing to do with you using them: ...


32

It's unfortunate you have pre-ordered Euros. USA banks offer terrible rates of exchange. What you need to do is investigate the foreign currency fees of your various credit and debit cards, almost all of which will work in Greece. Even Discover is accepted (look for Diners Club logo). However the fee will vary from 0 to 3%. Use the cards with the best rate ...


31

Generally not. Your Canadian money will definitely not work in US vending machines. Some border towns accept Canadian currency, but the further from the border you get, the less likely it is.


31

Exchange them for another currency (or denomination, if you want to and can) as soon as possible. If somehow that didn't work, your only choice would be to physically send them to a friend in India. (If you have one you trust enough.) You could send it by mail or courier, using a tracking number. Your friend would then deposit them into their bank account. ...


30

Airport changers are rarely offer good value but this time they did. In order to make money they have a BUY and SELL rate. The difference between these two is called the SPREAD and the real exchange rate is in between the two values, commonly but not necessarily in the middle. What happened is that they gave you the SELL rate which means that the ...


29

Unless it is a significant amount, changing coins isn't worth it. The amounts are small and most banks and foreign exchanges won't accept coins generally. My solution is to collect the left over foreign coins until I fly on an airline that participates in the Change for Good program and then donate them. British Airways and Virgin also have their own ...


28

I live in Denmark (Copenhagen), and I can go weeks without using cash these days. What I have is a 'Dankort' (national debit card system), so the experience doesn't necessarily transfer directly to foreign cards -- but the vast majority of places that accept it also take at least Visa and MasterCard. You'd need cash for bus tickets if you buy from the ...


28

Alternatively to an ATM, you can ask for cashback in stores. The way this works is that after scanning your items, you can ask the person at the till for cashback of X amount (normally smaller amounts work better as they might not have enough in the tills/the app of your choice might have a cap), they then add that to the purchase amount, charge the ...


26

It is certainly not true that "most European countries take gold". You cannot pay for goods in a shop with gold. Nor can you walk into a high street bank with gold and walk out with currency - you would need to do it through a specialist dealer. There are places where you can sell gold jewellery, but you will get very poor prices.


25

This varies very much depending on your country of origin and your destination. Best exchange rate mean lowest spread, but keep in mind, that some banks apart of the spread, also charge extra commissions. Keeping that in mind, there are some general tendencies. Exchange rates, from best, to worst: electronic transactions (i.e. transactions made directly ...


25

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


25

There is one Pound Sterling, which is represented by Bank of England, Scottish and Northern Irish notes and by Royal Mint coins (there aren't separate coins in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Gibraltar, the Falkland Islands and Saint Helena (overseas territories) and Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man (crown dependencies) each have their own ...


24

I did not visit Budapest, but spent some time in Hungary last year. My experience was that even if a few shops accept euros (especially larger shops in areas with many tourists), they tend to give you very unfavourable exchange rates. When hotels annouced their prices in forint and euro, in some cases, it even appeared to be two completely different prices....


24

You won't be able to exchange this money, it's deprecated since 1995. Then PLN was introduced (standing for PoLish New) with value 1 new zloty = 10 000 old zlotys. Even before denomination the money you have would be worth nothing, around 7 euro cents. If you bought this you've been scammed, I'm sorry. This is how 100 PLN note looks like now, worth around ...


23

There is no limit, if it's more than 10'000 USD however, you need to declare it: There is no limit on the amount of money that can be taken out of or brought into the United States. However, if a person or persons traveling together and filing a joint declaration (CBP Form 6059-B) have $10,000 or more in currency or negotiable monetary instruments, they ...


23

What you are talking about is this 100/50 USD bill: I have had this problem many times. If you end up with old USD bills older that series 2003-6 then it won't be accepted by most countries and money changers outside the United States. More frequently the problem I have noticed is with the bills with the front face photo to be smaller than the current bills....


23

Spanish Here. They are rarely accepted because of security concerns, and usually (in small stores) that extends to 100 euro and 200 euro notes also. If you need to use them, you can always ask for change in any bank.


23

The service you are referring to is called "dynamic currency conversion" and is sold as an extra convenience in locales with a heavy tourist presence, not just in airports. Many people are tempted to opt for their home currency because they assume that it will relieve them of inter-bank fees and disadvantageous exchange rates. Starting with your second ...


22

There is no limit to the amount of cash you can carry, however if you are carrying more than $10,000 USD (or equivalent in foreign currency) then you must declare it (full details on how to do that at the URL above). However bringing cash is very rarely the best strategy for foreign exchange. Although your credit or ATM cards might charge you a fee when ...


22

Credit and debit cards are extremely widely accepted in Sweden and Denmark. Almost every vendor of anything accepts them - from big stores and hotels to small restaurants to convenience stores. I once spent an entire week in Sweden and Denmark without once buying or spending any local currency. My last action was to buy a small bottle of water at Copenhagen ...


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