Hot answers tagged

91

It is never wrong to answer "I'm going camping, I have a hatchet" or "I'm going camping, I have a 5" folding knife" rather than just "yes" or "no" when you are asked a question like that verbally, by a person at your car window. If you are filling out a form, you can check Yes and write under that what it is. I do this all the time with the Food question, ...


84

Yes - the Basel tram system is mostly in Switzerland but extends into both France and Germany. There are five stations in France and three in Germany.


81

There are things I would try doing and there are the others. Attempting to enter Russia before my visa is valid (or attempt to overstay my Russian visa) even if by a few hours only clearly belongs to the others. The visa is valid from a minute before 00:01 of its first validity date and until a minute after 23:59 of its last validity date. Entering the ...


79

Do anybody have any clue what I should do??? Seek help from an immigration lawyer. 2 entry refusals and 1 visa refusal are not helpful at all. I don't think you can solve this yourself now. If you (or i) can sound desperate to ordinary folks like on this forum, we definitely will sound desperate to the immigration officers and a visa refusal for a non visa ...


72

Literally thousands and thousands of people every day cross into the US from Canada for less than a day. Some go shopping, some visit family, some visit tourist attractions, some have business meetings, some simply want to eat in a fast food restaurant that only exists in the US. Some commute to the US on a daily basis. There is absolutely nothing unusual ...


71

Generally not. Non-EU citizens who are family members of EU citizens within the meaning of the free movement directive are entitled to use the EU passport lines at Schengen borders, but other traveling companions are not (see articles 10(2) and 2(5) of the Schengen Borders Code). You can of course accompany him in the "all passports" queue. While that won'...


69

I wouldn't risk this. I exited Russia with a friend. He had given the end date for his visa, by mistake, as the day we left Moscow. Travelling by train, we didn't reach the border until a couple of days later. They got that he'd made an error, but they were not understanding. He was led away by armed guards. There was no explanation. The entire train was ...


66

If you are at a land border and inadmissible in both directions, you'll be taken to a detention centre. In the scenario you described, most likely Viru. They will book you in and then go over your travel document(s) with a view to determining where you are admissible. They will contact the consulate where you have citizenship and let them know you are in ...


65

I've been on a Russian train with a Canadian whose visa expired during the train ride (so just a couple of hours) as we crossed the border after midnight into Mongolia. Said passenger was marched off the train ("there is ... problem") and returned hours later with multiple fines and a black mark against their name. Short answer: It's not worth the risk. ...


53

This is in fact a completely legitimate photo. It is from Baarle-Nassau where the borders get really funky. Indeed, the one house you are looking it is just one of many, though it is probably the most famous. The exact address is Loveren 19, Baarle-Nassau 5111, The Netherlands. In a situation similar to that along, say, the India-Bangledeshi border, ...


53

At this point, stop digging. As Hanky Panky notes, you're looking increasingly desperate to get into the UK (buying multiple sets of international flights when you're unemployed and don't have sufficient funds to support yourself looks inherently suspicious), and you're producing an immigration record that will hurt your chances to get into the UK well into ...


52

From personal experience on the Thai-Cambodian border (left Thailand but refused entry into Cambodia), the departure stamp gets cancelled and you get back into the country you just left. Here's an example of how a cancelled Thai exit stamp looks like (taken from https://rompingandnguyening.wordpress.com/2014/07/03/bangkoking-again/):


50

how likely am I to get in trouble (as in, getting held up or detained, having devices confiscated, etc.) with the CBP? Extremely unlikely. I have carried music files across borders hundreds of times into dozens of countries (as do millions of other people every day) and I've never seen or heard anything like this. The CBP has no way of knowing whether ...


49

There are different scenarios to be taken into consideration here. Exiting to Canada: This situation is by far the easiest, given the data sharing between the US and Canada. In many cases (such as VWP nationals without an ESTA), when entering the US by land you will get a paper I94 form stapled into your passport. If you received this form, when entering ...


49

Doing a U-turn and coming back into Canada does not constitute any time spent in the United States. Your answer to their question is a simple "No". If they ask further and want more detail you can embellish them. "No" is the simple and factual answer of the matter. You have not ever been into the USA as a visiting traveller. A few hundred feet in order to ...


46

Let's think logically. Imagine one is a Russian border officer. One got a job during which each day got the stamp for the passport and visa checks: As you can see, there is a date on it, and it's numbered (the stamp is adjustable itself, however is sealed, so officer can't change the date by himself). So there is no time there (this is important). So back ...


46

The Home Office was asked in 2015, what the legal basis for such questioning is. Here is their answer. Assuming that you are an EEA national, Border Force officers can ask you any questions that allow them to establish your identity and nationality. This may include questions about your travel history. The EEA Regulations 2006 specify that an EEA ...


43

It's a former railroad line called the Vennbahn. It appears that way on the map because the former railroad and right-of-way were and still are Belgian territory. That creates the two exclaves of Germany within Belgium in the picture, though there are currently 5. Seems the trackline has since been removed and paved as a cycle path. Branch line Ravel ...


42

It will probably make them take a few extra moments to verify it's really you but the Department of State in the United States has no rules or notices that you need to look identical to your photo. Here is a Q/A about facial hair and hair coloring on the DoS travel website I found: https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/passports/requirements/photos....


41

Schengen does not remove the requirement to have appropriate documentation when crossing borders (or even within a country). It only removes systematic checks at borders. You can still have spot checks at border points. There could also be "emergency measures" checks restored at some borders. There could even be spot checks inside a country, completely ...


39

Nothing. You're good. You did the right thing by declaring food items. That was it. There will be no future impact. Entering Canada: Be sure . . . declare everything. Canadian law requires that you declare all food, plants and animals and related products that you bring into Canada. Failure to declare could lead to confiscation of products ...


37

You can use the DHS Traveler Redress Inquiry Program to help clear up issues like being delayed at the border every time. After you file your application, you will have 30 days to submit any supporting documents you may have. If you need more time than that to gather documents, you should get them first before you file a TRIP application. As part of the ...


35

Have you ever put foot on US soil? Yes. You were on US soil. If you committed a crime you would have been prosecuted under the US judicial system. If you died a US coroner would have issued a death certificate saying you died in the US. However, a border guard will never ask this question. They'll ask: Have you ever visited the US before? or perhaps ...


34

While there are no guarantees, you can always file a claim for redress under the DHS TRIP program (Traveler Redress Inquiry Program). This program is intended for people who, among other things, are: Denied or delayed airline boarding; Denied or delayed entry into and exit from the United States at a port of entry; or Continuously referred to ...


34

You've made several trips to the Schengen area using a multiple-entry visa, and when you most recently left, German officials gave you extra scrutiny. The purpose of that scrutiny was almost certainly to check whether you have violated the 90/180 rule. You have not, so there is nothing to worry about. In particular, it's perfectly normal (and very common) ...


29

One notable exception to the existing answers: If you have darker skin, and grow a particularly long/unkempt beard, you might open yourself up to some forms of racial and ethnic profiling. I have a friend who is of mediterranean descent, and has a beard that is a good 9 inches in length. He has to budget an extra two hours to pass through any airport, ...


28

I have an anecdotal answer to this question, as I once gave shelter to a British "travelling bum" who was hitchhiking from Australia back to the UK in the 70s (save for the sea voyage). The chap found himself penniless and destitute by the time he reached India, but miraculously came across some tourists in a car who were willing to give him a ride all the ...


28

It happened to me once in Saudi Arabia - due to a delay at immigration; my visa was marked as invalid because midnight had passed. They didn't stamp anything on my passport. I was held in a jail at the airport - was not allowed to enter the country. My passport was with the immigration officials; who then escorted me to the next departing flight to Kuwait ...


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