70

This is "cabotage" - when an airline from Country A gets permission to fly from A to B, and from B to A, it agrees not to do domestic flights inside B. Usually the way around it is to use your Airline A miles on a country B airline in the same alliance. (Eg if you had United miles, you could use them for Air Canada flights.) But I don't think WestJet (or any ...


62

Medical emergencies (which this definitely is since they have quarantined the city) are a valid reason for a visa extension. Make sure, however, that you notify the relevant authorities ASAP. Do not think that you can just stay until the quarantine is lifted and then leave as usual without proper extensions etc. Immediately contact the relevant authorities ...


47

This is a case of force majeure, which the Exit and Entry Administration Law of the People's Republic of China uses in 2 cases. Unfortunately not for this situation: punctual exit impossible due to force majeure but Article 55 (unforeseen arrival in China) states that you must immediately report to the nearest exit/entry border inspection authority or ...


30

It's not merely the agent (or airline) refusing to book it. It's illegal per Canadian law. Honestly, this part surprises me They are willing to book me on two separate itineraries where I leave Montreal and go somewhere in the U.S. and then on a separate itinerary proceed from the U.S. location to Vancouver. That's still illegal if you're not actually ...


8

Did a contract at a major Australian airline, where I was required to fly on specific planes on specific days. Even up to 30 min before, our own internal systems might show one plane, and then engineering or Ops would switch them. So the first point, is especially on busy routes, you can't always guarantee which plane you'll be on. As for the seat plan -...


8

You can absolutely sue the airline if you get sick after flying with them. You will lose, and if it makes it as far as the courts then you'll almost certainly need to pay their legal costs as well as your own. However that does not stop you from suing them.


6

They may do so at some point if the risk is deemed high enough (remember that WHO still doesn’t consider this as a severe enough pandemic at the international level). However: Why would they ban flights from all over China, when a majority of the cases are concentrated in a much, much smaller area? Remember that China is quite large. It would be akin to ...


6

Here is a quote from a page about the actual swabs: Itemiser swabs are made of Teflon coated fiberglass that are designed to handle the high heats required to collect samples from the traps. Sample traps hold up well to water, heat and use but must be replaced if they are torn or have been contaminated in the collection process. They are not pre-soaked ...


4

This from Patrick Smith's excellent book Cockpit Confidential: Studies have shown that a crowded airplane is no more germ-laden than other enclosed spaces - and usually less. Those underfloor filters are described by manufacturers as being of hospital quality. I needn’t be reminded that hospitals are notorious viral incubators, but Boeing says that ...


3

The cotton swabs used in those kinds of procedures are usually sterile and the same suppliers as you would find in a hospital or doctor's office. In a country like Canada, I would expect that those swabs are completely harmless to any individual, no matter newborn or adult. The swabs are usually used to test for illegal substances(explosives and/or drugs). ...


3

If you're a regular traveller this is exactly how to travel. All of the things you mention are allowed, at least, usually. There are very few places now that totally disallow liquids, and indeed, several countries don't consider liquids in any quantity a security threat at all. For the other countries that do impose restrictions on liquids, I suggest you ...


3

The answer will vary, depending upon where you're boarding and where you're going. In the US, or flying to the US, TSA has this to say about carry-on liquids: You are allowed to bring a quart-sized bag of liquids, aerosols, gels, creams and pastes in your carry-on bag and through the checkpoint. These are limited to travel-sized containers that are 3.4 ...


3

Airports don't have any specific reason to check passports and typically do not do it. In Europe, usually, you will encounter: Checks by ground handling personnel contracted out by the airlines. The main purpose is enforcing the airline's price discrimination/yield management operations by preventing ticket resale. They might also have other purposes ...


3

For a single ticket, 90 minutes is plenty, if there are no major delays. You will be coming in either in Terminal 2 or 3 and departing from Terminal 3. Even if you come in at Terminal 2 you can take the Skytrain, which is quick and easy. See https://www.changiairport.com/en/airport-guide/transport/transfer-between-terminals-and-jewel.html


3

This seems to be a pretty common feature. For Expedia, for instance, you can choose "Show flexible dates". Google Flights also has it under "Date Grid". It doesn't to show time of day, however, so searching for the lowest fare will likely get you a lot of red-eye and such.


2

Kiwi supports upto 8 segments for multi city flight search AirWander (https://airwander.com) has the option for multi city flight search upto 16 segments, screenshots for example, At the moment, flight search engines and maximum number of segments for multi-city search can be summarised as follows: Expedia : 5 Kayak : 6 Google Flights: 5 ITA Matrix : 6 ...


1

@Doc has already given a great straight answer to the question asked. To expand on that: How will you know that you got sick at the plane and not at your holiday destination departure airport arrival airport any public transport taken anywhere during that day anybody else you've had contact with You will know it takes symptoms a bit to show up (for flu - ...


1

This is thin ice for an Answer, but I'll bet the reality is: a) The Bolivian government issued this form to be completed by those entering the country; b) The Bolivian government makes airlines distribute the forms to incoming passengers; and c) Sometimes, maybe even most of the time, a Bolivian officer will demand the completed form on arrival.


1

Kiwi and Airwander have expertise in multi-stop as does ITA matrix if you know how to use it. Airtreks can do up to 25 stops. Indie can do 25 stops as well: I help build these 2 products over the years to be clear. Cheers to all.


1

Delta's Dublin to JFK flight changes from a 767 to an A330 starting next Friday, the 31st of January. This change was announced back in May of 2019. Whilst looking at the flight history is often a good indication of the type of plane that will fly future flights, they do change over time, however in general these changes will be reflected on the carriers ...


1

Beat That Flight (my site), has this feature which I term Flexisearch, eg: For Australian based users, at least, it also does this focusing on popular routes. Example: Melbourne to Tokyo:


1

Your understanding is correct. You can be admitted for up to 6 months and there is no rule preventing that. Or the officer can, in his/her discretion, admit you for shorter than 6 months or deny you entry altogether.


1

I have not been on too many codeshared flights, so my personal experience is not massive there, but you have two options: Look at the online departure board. Here's example for Heathrow: Bunch of flights departing to basically two locations: Glasgow and Zagreb - most likely codeshares. In case of Glasgow we can be sure it's codeshare because it's departing ...


1

Since you did not specify at what time you wanted to know this as in before or after buying tickets etc. One way to know is to look at the departure boards in the airport as they will rotate through all the code share flights for that particular flight. If you need this information before you buy the ticket it depends on the airline or agent you use but ...


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