Hot answers tagged

89

I'm very sad to say that this has all the signs of a classic romance scam. How do you know this person? Have you ever met? We've seen several questions with the similar pattern. Here are some resources: The US Embassy in Russia on Internet Dating Scams. One of their scenarios ("The individual I’m writing to says that s/he needs $1,000.00 to show for "pocket"...


84

Use an app. Virtually everywhere these days has either Uber/ Lyft/ Grab/ Gojek/ Ola/ Didi/ Yandex/ Careem /local clone ride-sharing service, or an app put out by local taxi companies in an attempt to compete. In Istanbul, at time of writing Uber is in a weird not-quite-legal-or-illegal state, but BiTaksi seems to be the app of choice: http://www.bitaksi.com/...


82

It's a really bad idea, so much that I registered just to warn you (I live in Venezuela). When there was a severe shortage of cash the government blamed it on banknotes being extracted through the Colombian border for sale at a profit and "hoarding". Arrests were highly publicized, which additionally helped support the conspiracy theory of an "...


80

There is no requirement to have €10,000 when you are in Europe. It sounds like someone is confusing two things: The requirement to have enough money to support yourself for the duration of your trip. This amount varies according to the duration of your trip, and according to the kinds of things you plan to do. The requirement to report cash if you are ...


75

The US Department of State publishes recommended per diem ("per day") reimbursement rates for every major city. These are intended to enable fair reimbursement for travel expenses incurred by US federal employees transacting business on behalf of the US government. For instance an employee travelling to London will be entitled to claim 322 USD for lodging ...


71

The threshold can't be determined to a particular number, because so much of it depends on your facts and circumstances, and what you show (and tell) CBP. And it's worse than that. It casts shade on the purpose for your visit, risking a refusal. What I'm about to say is unfair. For many of our HNQ visitors, it's shocking that the 4th and 5th Amendments ...


71

Rarely does one see so many misconceptions in one question! coach will definitely or almost certainly be stopped in Switzerland for checks on luggage and things, can I risk being seized all my money by Swiss authorities or will I have to give them something? ... I've been told that Swiss authorities are quite ruthless. ... but even ...


65

It's the number one, with a left-hand stroke, and is not uncommon in European countries, including France. This from Wikipedia on Regional Handwriting Variation, (including the illustration): The numeral 1 — This numeral is sometimes written with a serif at the top extending downward and to the left. People in some parts of Europe extend this stroke ...


62

The currency of Switzerland is obviously the Swiss Franc, not the Euro. Many businesses accept euros, but: not all do to make sure they're covered against fluctuations of the exchange rate, they will add a "spread" on the exchange rate in their favour, sometimes quite extreme. For instance, even though 1 EUR is about 1.10 CHF at this time, they may very ...


59

May I suggest before departing Japan, visit one of the Temples/Shrines. You can deposit your coins in the box just inside the grounds. The other thing you could do with them is to put them in a smallish envelope and hand to a homeless person. In Japan, it is customary to place money in an envelope before we give to someone.


58

It is perfectly normal to accept or reject the receipt if that is asked. It is slightly impolite to reject a receipt if it has been printed and handed out, since this slows the checkout line for everybody and since the sales clerk may not have a waste basket nearby. The shop is always required to keep records for tax purposes. Generally that means printing ...


56

Insurance is most useful for rare but severe losses. Frequent but minor losses should be self-insured (i.e. paid by you), for precisely the reasons you stated. If my home burns down, I don't care that insurers make money on homeowner's insurance. I can't afford a few hundred thousand dollars to replace my home and contents. No amount of saving behaviour ...


55

There are no rules that say a hotel has to refund money to already-booked patrons if they lower their prices. And you would certainly object if the hotel asked you for more money because 'prices had gone up since you booked'. Forcing hotels to refund money to customers with previous bookings would essentially mean they stopped reducing prices, because it ...


55

Thankfully your card hasn't been charged. Do not continue to deal with this service ONLY use the government site, NOTHING else. Not only are you likely to be charged much more; they may not even submit the application correctly, which could have devastating immigration-related legal consequences for you.


52

I don't think it would be polite to give a bunch of them to cashier Foreigners always overthink "politeness" issues in Japan... Handling payments, in whatever (legal) form, is their job, they will dutifully do it without any issues. Just try not to do it during busy times, out of consideration for other customers waiting behind you. If you want to donate ...


51

I don't personally think there are any ethical issues with taking change away. One good reason for doing so is to land with a little change next time you visit; I find it quite handy to have a couple of quarters in my pocket when I land in the US, just in case I need to make a small purchase from a vending machine, or a call from a payphone. Visitors to ...


51

At point-of-sale terminals, cheque and savings transactions are processed through the domestic EFTPOS debit card system. As far as I know they only accept locally issued debit cards. Credit transactions are processed through the relevant international card scheme (Visa, Mastercard, etc). Despite its name, they accept both debit and credit cards issued ...


51

What you've described is the case for all insurance. If the expected value of the insurance policy for the average buyer costs more than the premium, the insurance company will eventualy go out of business because they're paying out more in claims than they collect. All insurance, on average (as phoog notes, if you know your own risk is higher than average ...


50

They are valid, in the sense that they are legal tender accepted by the US Government, but any individual business anywhere in the world can decide whether or not to accept them or not. There is no guarantee anyone will accept your money. Some businesses may not accept $100 bills at all (in the United States, it's not uncommon for stores to only accept $20 ...


50

"Why should you have travel insurance?" - because the insurance company makes money from it. That is their reason to offer it. What is your reason to have insurances? If you have the need to cover your potential loss because it's catastrophic for your personal situation. You definitely should cover your house with insurance, because if it burns down, you ...


48

There's a few places where you may encounter difficulties: Lots of people expect tips in hotel, especially bellhops (the people who will carry your luggage to your room or into your car). I'm not sure about valets (those who park your car for you), I don't drive. Having a small quantity of one-dollar bills is always useful for those cases. In most other ...


47

It would plainly be ridiculous to require all travelers to declare the small change in their pockets, yet allow undeclared paper money up to $10,000. What the second part tries to say is that all kinds of currency, whether coins or banknotes, and whether US issue or not, count towards the $10,000 threshold. (And if you do hit that threshold, then in ...


47

While you can go through the hassle of opening a US bank account, is there a reason you aren't just using your credit cards and a normal GBP bank account in the US? You'll want to check with your bank on what fees they charge, but most UK ATM cards and credit cards will simply work in the US. (Avoid using credit cards for ATM withdrawls, due to the high fees ...


47

My advice for anyone who wants to get out of a difficult situation is to not get in that situation in the first place. In this case, the easiest way would be to take a second debit card, or a credit card, with you. But in case you're already abroad and are stuck with a single broken card, you could ask the hotel if it's possible to pay by bank transfer (...


46

It is indeed a (national) collector's coin. It is legal tender in the country where it was issued, but not elsewhere in the eurozone. Even in its country of origin, I could imagine that many people would be surprised to receive one or perhaps even refuse to believe that it is genuine. And looking at the photos you can find on the web, I must say that their ...


45

I second the comment by B.Liu. Make really sure this is not a scam. I once used Western Union to send money to a relative abroad. They are still in business and so are several other providers. (Andrew mentioned Moneygram in his comment. I'm not suggesting a specific provider based on my limited transactions. Check their websites and FAQs.) Your friend ...


45

I'm sorry to hear this, and hope you find a way to rebuild in Nigeria. The UK government has a scheme to help in just this situation: see https://www.gov.uk/return-home-voluntarily Even if you think you do not meet the criteria on the website, I strongly suggest getting in contact with them, as they likely have some degree of discretion. Buying you a plane ...


44

Technically no, practically speaking yes. Many of the coins look the same as US coins at a first glance, so careless clerks may accept them. I am in the US and often find myself with Canadian pennies and quarters which are very similar to the US counterparts. Having all the new coins in the US in recent years makes it even harder for people to tell the ...


43

Yes, seriously, although the US$65 "royalty" is actually included in the US$200 "daily package fee". However, that's the group rate (3 or more people), you get socked another $40/30 per person if you're traveling solo/duo, and another $50/night/person if you're visiting when it's neither midwinter nor monsoon (March-May, Sep-Nov). Bhutan explicitly wants ...


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