12

Canal de Riego Numero Cinco links Canal Gobernador De La Serna (itself linked to Rio Paraná Mini and thence to Rio Paraná Guazu) to Arroyo (stream) Los Sauces to the west. As the crow flies about 84 – 89 km from Maltería Hudson and about 29 km from Campana, the nearest centre of population. Maltería Hudson was an Argentine malt producer owned by Cervecería y ...


10

As with anywhere travelling, exercise a reasonable amount of precaution. La Boca has a (deserved) reputation for being one of the more dangerous areas of BA, but that does not mean you cannot safely visit there. Don't dress like a tourist, leave jewellery, big cameras at your hotel or hostel Get advice from your hotel / hostel on the safe areas to go. Don't ...


8

Pretty dangerous. I was mugged there at gunpoint after deciding to walk in a straight direction back to town... a good anecdote but not something to repeat (in short though if you go to south America you will probably be mugged at some point). I've heard stories of youths ketteling foreigners at games outside the stadium for tickets and god knows what else.


7

Not sure if this should be an answer or comment, as I've only been there during daytime... As you probably know, parts of Boca are very touristy (Caminito especially, and the stadium kind of too). Some areas of Boca, beyond Caminito, are worse security-wise: to the east and south (if I recall correctly), and especially across the water. A map in my ...


7

If you are arriving from an international flight, you will probably land in Ezeiza (EZE). There you have two good options: Remis (car with driver): When you arrive, after the customs control, you will see a bunch of stalls selling this service. There is a flat fare to the city center of around AR$200. Some companies are cheaper than other, shop around "...


7

There are regular and express ferries from Buenos Aires to Montevideo. One option goes directly to the Ciudad Vieja district of Montevideo, situated very close to downtown, with the Buquebus ferry company, and takes about three hours. Another option is the ferry+bus combination (which I've personally done in the reverse direction), which has two companies -...


5

For what it's worth (probably not much), Google Maps gives a walking route from Santiago to Buenos Aires as follows: Roughly south from Santiago to Chimbarongo, using smaller roads that roughly parallel Highway 5; Thence roughly southeast via Los Queñes and Canton to the border crossing at Paso del Planchón; Thence roughly southeast to Bardas Blancas, and ...


5

Having done this a couple times I can say that your passport will be stamped twice: once for entry and once for exit. In general, the two immigration checks - Argentinian and Uruguayan - are back to back so the likelihood of missing out on a stamp is fairly low.


4

While this may be my personal experience, it can help others, so I'm posting the answer to my own question. It all worked out well. I had plenty of time to do everything. I even had a problem with one of my luggage that was lost in Santiago, I had time to wait a lot for it and to register a complain with the company. It's not a very big airport, 2h40 is ...


4

From this answer by the Buquebus company Buenos días Maria, tenemos WIFI sin costo en la terminal de Puerto Madero. Saludos. Which translates to: yes there is free wifi.


3

Rome2Rio quotes 1100 pesos (127USD) as the minimum, and links to the bus company website. So I guess it depends on the day of travel / purchase.


3

There are a range of options to get into town (Manuel Tienda Leon - a shuttle company, local buses or taxi) - see the piece on Wikitravel. EZE is about 30-45 min from downtown by taxi, although during busy times it can be longer. From town to AEP, it's easier - about 20 minutes by taxi. Your best bet given your tight time-frame is to get a taxi from one ...


3

My answer would back up what I've read here so far. Caminito is cool, on the walk to the stadium you should use caution, but beyond the stadium you should probably not venture too far. I did with a group of people and as predicted the two who were straggling got held up at gunpoint by a drugged out guy. He took the nice camera hanging around the guys neck ...


3

One factor I would like to add: the "blue" exchange rate can be quite different in different places. Namely, when there are a lot of tourists around such as in Ushuaia or El Calafate in Patagonia, the supply of Dollars is much higher and the exchange rate will not be as good for you. It will not be as easy to find "cuevas" as in Buenos Aires (where they ...


3

As others are saying, La Boca is dangerous, but at the same time that doesn't mean you have to avoid it. Buenos Aires can be a very secure place on one block and a really scary dangerous one on the other block, you have to learn how to navigate the city. The same is true for La Boca. There are zones of La Boca where there is almost a 100% chance that ...


3

In normal times (the cited TripAdvisor answer is undated), yes. Because of the Argentinian border shutdown, however, the Buquebus service is now suspended and the Buquebus terminals closed to public access. Source (in Spanish): Buquebus Announcement


3

According to https://www.wifimap.io/4047-montevideo-free-wifi, there is a free wifi hotspot located in the same place as the Buquebus terminal:


2

Again, it all will depend on people's level of experience and, to some extent, luck. The areas around Caminito and the stadium, especially when a game is on, can be very crowded and so the types of crime might be more pick-pocketing type. However, even one alley off a main street and it can change quickly - a 70-yr old NZ woman in my hostel got attacked ...


2

As everyone has told, the least touristy parts of La Boca are quite dangerous. I think it's important to point out, however, that muggers in Buenos Aires generally don't hurt their victims if they comply. If you are mugged, just give the mugger what he asks for and you should be safe. It's not a nice experience by any measure, but your physical integrity is ...


2

I´m in the business of doing airport transfers here, this is a tight, but doable connection, and we suggest you get to AEP the fastest way you can, which would be to hire a reliable private chauffeured car service, who will be waiting for you with a sign right as you arrive. 4 hours is the bare minimum we suggest for this transfer, as your arriving flight ...


2

You should follow the instructions given to passengers by the crew. Most likely you'll remain inside the aircraft.


2

There really is no need to bring pesos to Argentina. Though you will have to decide what works for you. At airports, you can pay with credit cards and many debit cards. Changing money at airports is easy and safe (if typically a bit more expensive). ATMs are easily available, both in BA and Mendoza. Having some cash on hand is practical, just in case, but ...


2

The wall itself is visible on Street View: Graffiti usually lasts for a few months at most, so it's anyone's guess if it will still be there by the time you arrive.


2

Terminals A and C ("Mercedes Sosa") at Ezeiza (Ministro Pistarini International Airport) are separated by Terminal B, which is about 376 metres long. On foot that distance should take a few minutes. Wayde van Niekerk has run further in 43.03 seconds. Diagram (no scale) courtesy iFly.com:


2

The blue rate is the street rate. You will be changing dollars on the street. So, yes, there is a risk involved. That said, it's a fairly small risk. Though technically perhaps not legal, street changers are so common and the exchanges are so public, you're likely not to run into problems. In Buenos Aires, go to the city's main shopping street, Florida. ...


2

As far as I know, Tuenti is your best bet. They're probably the cheapest provider and have everything pretty much automated. Just buy a SIM card (should be around ~1USD probably) in a kiosk or somewhere, follow instructions and you're almost set. You might even get one for free if you walk around long enough. Afterwards you should top-up online, which will ...


2

I don't think so. This terminal is indeed structured like an airport, with check-in and stuff, but there is fewer hassles - not that much of security theatre, boarding is faster, boats don't need time to steer around like planes do, etc. I think 45 minutes is more than enough to board the ship, I don't think they are leaving without you.


2

The entire Subte network (sans the Premetro Light Rail and Urquiza Line + various train yards) is underground, so there are no major elevated portions of the network. If you are visiting to see elevated stations, I believe some of the commuter rail lines just underwent considerable grade separation projects, but those are technically not part of the Subte.


1

I've taken a couple of flights where there is a intermediate stop. On one occasion, I was heading to the plane's final destination (St Lucia) and there was an announcement asking us to stay on the plane if this stop (Antigua, IIRC) wasn't your destination. On the return to London, the plane stopped again and more passengers boarded. I don't recall if ...


1

Flights within South America are notoriously expensive. Occasionally, you might be able to get a deal, but you'd have to keep monitoring ticket prices. While one-way tickets seldom can be had on the cheap. There is no easy overland route from Argentina to Colombia, but it's certainly doable, and you're doing it yourself in reverse already. The typical route ...


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