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From Wikipedia: Paraguay observes DST under decree 1867 of March 5, 2004. DST ends on the second Sunday of March and starts on the first Sunday of October. In 2007, DST started on October 15, 2006 and ended on March 11, 2007. In 2010, Paraguay changed its own DST rules because of the energy crisis, ending DST on the second Sunday in April, ...


9

According to Busbud there are three companies that offer routes from Asuncion to Santiago. NSA, Pullman Del Sur (can recommend), and Brujula. What I'd suggest instead is if you have time, stopping in Foz de Iguazu (for the Iguazu Falls), and in either Buenos Aires if you're detouring, or Mendoza, just before the mountains. I highly recommend Mendoza - ...


9

I don't really consider this a short trip, not compared to the flight. The only real ground transport option in South America is the bus (coach). There are some domestic trains around the big cities on the eastern coast, but for most rides you have to take a bus. I took a bus from Salta in Northern Argentina to Asunción and that took about 24 hours (...


7

I made exactly this trip in 2013 (except from São Paulo and not Rio). I didn't find I needed a car: fly to Foz do Iguaçu, get bus 120 (or a taxi) to the centre of town. There is a website devoted to tourism at the Itaipu dam. Plenty of tour operators in town will sell you a tour, but you can also buy tickets online there with a credit card. I took the ...


6

No, they do not accept any currency but US Dollars and Paraguayan Guarani. Further, the dollar bills must be in mint condition; all denominations were accepted (I paid with $100×1, $20×2, $5×3, and $1×5) Luckily, there is an ATM in the room from which you can withdraw guarani upon arrival; I used this to account for my $100 bill being rejected due to a mark ...


5

From several travelers I've met and spoken to (including when I was in Iguazu)... If you're busing over the border to Cuidad de Este, the bus driver wouldn't even stop at the border. You can get dropped off in the city, and picked up again a couple of hours later when the bus comes back. It's a sort of 'we trust you' approach, it seems? Very odd. However, ...


4

Yes, you can use your old visa. You need to bring both passports AND evidence of name change, such as marriage certificate. Additionally if your evidence is not in English (i.e. Paraguay marriage certificate in Spanish), you need to bring a certified English translation. See for example https://th.usembassy.gov/visas/nonimmigrant-visas/non-immigrant-visas-...


4

I have visited Paraguay about 5 times in the past two years on my UK passport. EU residents don't need to get a visa ahead of time. It is very easy to do a visa run to Brazil or Argentina and get another 90 days I believe it is easy to get extension to visa inside the country from the immigration dept Most government rules in Paraguay can be "bent" or "...


4

despegar.com is a flight search engine for Latin America that seems pretty good. (I found out about it recently when someone here on Travel SE mentioned it.) You should be able to buy the tickets directly through despegar, but I have no experience of how well that works. Alternatively, just use it to find airlines / schedules / prices, and then book via ...


3

NSA is the main bus operator on the route. At Busbud we usually sell their tickets and had figured out some issues around booking for foreigners. Unfortunately, it looks like our connection to their system is down right now. We'll investigate. Here's a schedule for Asunción to Ciudad del Este from NSA's site. Good news is you would be able to get on a bus ...


3

A multiple-entry tourist visa allows you to enter and stay for 90 days multiple times, until the visa expires. There is usually a minimum waiting time between exit and re-entry, and that is different from country to country. For example, with a Schengen or Russian visa, you can stay 90 days within a 180-day period from your first entry; see also this visa ...


3

This happened to my wife. I am an American citizen. When we got married, she only had her Russian passport with a standard B1/B2 visa. We got married in the USA. After we returned to UK, she changed her passport and the new passport had her new surname. The next time we went to the USA, she flew on her new passport, but carried her old passport with the ...


3

Sort of. If you use the multipurpose RometoRio site to search for routes between those two cities, you can see that there's a bus that takes 3 hours, with a link to sol del paraguay to buy it. However, it is in Spanish. If you have Google Chrome, however, there's usually a popup 'translate this page' option which will try and convert it into English onthe ...


2

It's entirely possible, cheap, and simple. Go to the main bus terminal in Puerto Iguazu. Get on a bus going to Ciudad del Este (it'll likely just say 'Paraguay'), and it travels across into Brazil to Foz Iguacu, and then across another bridge into Ciudad del Este. You'll go through customs/border at Argentina/Brazil, and then...probably again going into ...


2

Wikipedia has a page on tipping and gratuities, and claims: Service charges are included with the bill, and tipping is uncommon However, their link is broken and I suspect it might be wrong. All other resources I can find online indicate that you should, and how much. About.com: 10% in restaurants and taxis. $.50 - .75 per bag to porters ...


2

At the moment, Pullman del Sur offers direct connections between Santiago and Asuncion. From Santiago, they leave every Tuesday at 11am for 80.000 CLP. Crucero del Norte also travels between Santiago to Asuncion. They leave every Monday and Friday at 11:50am. You switch buses in Cordoba, but you buy just one ticket in Santiago. The cost is 70.000 CLP or 78....


2

I sent an email to the Embassy in Rome with the pictures of the ID card and they replied saying that the number is, as I thought, the one in the front of the card: 3264519.


1

There's a page about this service on the Argentinian government website. All the information is in an image (accessibility? what's that?). The image is dated 21/05/2019. The service operates from Monday to Friday. (There is no mention of public holidays, but you should double-check if you travel on a day that's a holiday in either country.) Trains depart ...


1

You can't actually cross at the falls, so you would have to backtrack, twice, anyway. The total distance would come down to about 100km. See screenshot of the route. I'm quite sure the ferry between Argentina and Paraguay runs from within the town of Foz to the tri-border point on the Paraguayan side. If you zoom in on the Google Map, you can see what are ...


1

To address the logistical part of the question, the Wikivoyage page on Ciudad del Este, Paraguay notes the following: The most common way to arrive is across the Puente de la Amistad (Friendship Bridge) which connects Ciudad del Este in Paraguay and Foz do Iguaçu in Brazil. There are frequent bus connections, also to and from Puerto Iguazú in Argentina. ...


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