352

I will answer this with a very long answer since aviation safety is my day to day job. The window shade opening is a part of a long process to prepare the cabin for sudden (unexpected) emergencies. Why is that? Well, cabin crew have only 90 seconds to evacuate all passengers in case of emergencies. The process of evacuation itself should not take more than ...


113

What recourse will a passenger who is scheduled to fly commercial on that model of plane have if they refuse to board because of safety concerns? None. The airline and the relevant regulators are the competent authorities to determine what types of planes are safe to fly, not the passengers. Of course, in many cases, airlines will do things such as ...


110

Because it would be ridiculously expensive. Not only would it require a massive increase in the number of planes an airline has to purchase and maintain, it would not even garantee that there would always be a spare since there are many different types of airplanes that serve different purposes. It would be impossible to have one of each on standby in every ...


95

I can think of two reasons. One, sadly, you have disallowed, which is the legroom answer. But what if the answer actually is about legroom? Since I don't have enough room for my knees, I have to straighten my legs, which requires me to put my feet under the seat in front of me. It seems to me that if passengers were supposed to put bags under their own ...


89

The age of the aircraft has never been the root cause of an aviation catastrophe. It's the maintenance, the crew and the safety policies/procedures of the airline. A new aircraft that is not maintained well or being operated by a bad crew for an airline that does not have good safety practices is far more dangerous than a 30-year-old well-maintained ...


70

Overcurrent isn't the only reason for an airline circuit to trip. It might also be looking for ground faults/residual current (GFCI/RCD) or listening for arc faults (AFCI). Any appliance can have either problem. Trains are electric beasts - even a diesel train has the diesel engine driving a giant electric generator on the order of 3 million watts (with ...


68

Asked and answered on Aviation.SE. Summary: They're required by US federal aviation regulations. The apparent rationale is: a desperate, or unscrupulous, smoker might (illegally) light a cigarette in the lavatory. If they do, it is good for there to be somewhere safe for them to put the cigarette butt. Otherwise, if they don't see anywhere else to put it, ...


64

It is not a pleasant situation for both of them - the passenger or the large passenger. It is very uncomfortable for the passenger and totally embarrassing for the large guy. In addition to that, it is uncomfortable and embarrassing for the staff. Unfortunately, there is no one single rule that applies here; each airline has its own policy regarding this. ...


63

I have never before noticed this, but a quick check over several airlines at Seatguru confirmed that other airlines do that as well. The logic behind this is that the letters A and K will always be window seats. The letter K is chosen, because it's the highest that you can go in a normal airplane with 10 seats across (An A380 for instance). I is omitted ...


58

Look at a typical airline company on Wikipedia. Let's take KLM for example: Fleet size: 117 Destinations: 138 As you can see, in order to have a spare plane on every flight, KLM would need to buy more spare planes than they have in the actual fleet, meaning their ticket prices would have to double in order to cover the expenses. Since people are not ready ...


55

I always have one or two plastic bottles with me. I empty them before I go through security and then re-fill them from a tap in the restroom in the waiting area. I've done this many times, and security never asked about the empty bottles, and even if they do you can explain what they are for.


54

The three major airports of Paris with commercial flights are Paris Charles de Gaulle-Roissy (CDG), Paris Orly (ORY), and Paris Beauvais (BVA). Since longhaul flights to Canada only originate from CDG and ORY, in this answer we'll only consider these two airports. Short answer is no, there is no one side of the plane that you can sit on that will guarantee ...


52

If a regulator has ordered that aircraft grounded and an airline continues to fly it, contact the regulator. Beyond that, you would have a hard time arguing that the fears were "well founded". They may not be baseless, but still not "well founded". At that point, it would be a passenger voluntarily refusing to board. No recourse.


51

The gymnastics required to put your bag behind your feet in such a small space would be very interesting. Bending forward and sliding it in, sure that works. But pushing it back when you can't see and your legs are in the way? Most people are not good at bending into pretzels in 31" of space.


51

I work for an airline. Let me offer a much simpler explanation: The seats are taken by other passengers. Seats in the rear are popular because they are close to the lavatory. Depending on the airline, it may also be the first rows to be served in-flight meals. One of the comments questions the pricing scheme. Airlines have plenty of data to determine ...


49

Yes. A bag is not a restricted item and so you can back as many bags in your suitcase or another bag. This something I often do to carry specialty bags. I have used this to pack camera bags that I will use at my destination, backpacks to use for hiking or as day pack, beach bags, etc. My wife often packs some purses that match different outfits in too. ...


47

Technically it's entirely possible, and airplane manufacturers release sketches like this regularly. There are three intertwingled main reasons why this hasn't (cough) taken off yet in practice: Airplanes have really tight regulatory safety requirements, including everybody on board being able to evacuate within a certain number of seconds, and this is ...


46

If a socket says "100 W max", it doesn't mean, that your laptop would be drawing less. Your laptop/charger will draw what it needs. The socket will provide the power that your laptop needs, until it reaches the rating of the circuit breaker, and it will trip (as you have experienced). Also, as the 2 comments already have mentioned, a load peak can always ...


44

Lavatories (airplane toilets) can be inoperative for many reasons, they could get blocked by someone vomiting in the sink, or by throwing tissues or other objects in either the sink or the toilet seat. Sometimes, when a waste tank is full, or there's a problem in the sensor of the tank giving a wrong signal, all flushes connected to that tank will not work, ...


43

Some years ago I was a part of an operating cabin crew in a flight bound to Dubai, it was the time for one of Dubai's festivals. Anyway, I was positioned at the back and at the time we already started the descend, the crew chief called me and asked me to take a walk around and ask people to sit because many were standing! the plane was a narrow-bodied ...


43

Elevating my comment to an answer, as it's more appropriate as one. Nope, no automatic right to compensation here - you can complain to the airline about the conduct of fellow passengers and its crew, and ask for compensation but they aren't obligated to provide you with any. You could complain to the aviation authority in the origin, destination or ...


42

All modern aircraft have to go through incredibly stringent safety checks and are essentially equally safe. Accidents are so rare that any apparent differences in aircraft safety are mostly meaningless statistical anomalies. Airfleets.net has a chart of accidents per aircraft type, but it's not easy to make any practical conclusions about it. For example, ...


42

This study (S.-H. Kim and H.-Y. Chun, “Aviation turbulence encounters detected from aircraft observations: spatiotemporal characteristics and application to Korean Aviation Turbulence Guidance,” Meteorological Applications, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 594–604, Oct. 2016, doi: 10.1002/met.1581.) assessed the number of turbulence encounters for various aircraft in the ...


41

Three reasons for this: The main reason: Passenger comfort. If the light continuously remains on, then if a passenger opens the door of the lavatory when the cabin lights are off, it will fill the cabin with unwanted light. This can be avoided by making sure that the door is closed before turning on the light. Aircraft lavatory doors and door frames are ...


41

They usually do? We just don't notice when backup gets used. They have some planes to spare and they can wet lease planes (including crew) from other companies. They can also redirect passengers to another airlines. Cancelling flight costs money (and reputation losses) and getting spare plane also costs money. They just have to choose what's cheaper in a ...


41

This alone explains it all: it also happens when I plug the charger alone without the laptop at the other end. Because of the way power supplies are constructed, they draw extremely short, but very large "inrush" current. This can sometimes even visually manifest itself as a tiny spark when plugging it in. The PSU doesn't even need to be turned on, it's ...


40

It is a hanger, you can hang your jacket or anything similar there. The same exact ones typically available in lavatories for passengers and in galleys for crew members. In the passengers cabin, they are usually available in first or business classes' seats and it comes with a sign: I guess they forgot to add the sign, making it harder for passenger to know ...


38

It is windows shade adjustment. In the new B787 lines, you press up/down button to make the windows darker or brighter. The process takes minutes so you might not be able to realize it. It's not as quick as a curtain. The crew can control it to simulate the night on long flight. So the button will end up being useless during "night mode". They can also ...


38

At the same time, you almost never see turbulence in movies or television.. Of course not. Aircraft scenes are filmed in studios, not in an actual aircraft. Studios sit firmly on the ground, so it takes a lot of extra effort, time and money to shoot a credible turbulence scene, so they will only do this if the story really requires it. Are all typical ...


37

Inconveniencing yourself never creates an argument. Inconveniencing others, does however. If you were to put your bag under your seat, you would be affecting the comfort of the passenger behind you. That passenger may not even have brought a bag on board, but now finds their comfort dependent on the whims of the passenger in front of them. I think it's easy ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible