49

No. I have designed headphones for airplane use and there is no difference from designing connectivity for regular consumer electronics use. Physical connectors vary from airline to airline and from aircraft to aircraft and some will require an adapter, at least to get a full stereo experience. There is some "normal" mechanical risk: airplane seats ...


17

It depends. The sockets are not well maintained, so you may get a bent sockets which may damage your plug. So if your plug doesn't enter easily, just don't use the socket. If you hear some white noise, you may not want to use such socket. For short time it should not be a problem, but on long term white noises (and "scratches") could ruin the ...


10

No. As far as I can tell from previous flights, they're just normal headphone jacks. I've used my own headphones in these the past without any issue. On older planes, you see twin audio jacks, separating left from right audio channels. This was used to improve the quality (and, cynically, encourage passengers to buy special headphones). So we used to see ...


3

Listen to the safety briefing and other announcements. The airline will tell you what you shouldn't do. My experience: They used to tell passengers to switch off all electronic devices, but starting from a few years ago, they started telling passengers to switch off large electronic devices, and small devices may be used if they are securely held in your ...


2

There are two different issues in your question: Whether you can import and use a drone in a foreign country. What the rules are for lithium batteries on flights. Some countries do not allow drones at all, or require specific permits or licenses to import or use them. I'm not going to cover this aspect here, but you should definitely check that. The Drones ...


2

Define "any". There may not be any in practical terms, but in theory a defective/damaged headphone amplifier can send out-of-spec voltage to the headphones and that could damage them. In theory, a malicious actor could even sabotage the jack to do that intentionally, though in an airplane the risk of that surely is infinitesimal. I don't use USB ...


1

Yes, in most cases. Years ago the airlines and regulators determined that electronic devices are safe to use in all phases of flight. There are 1000's of videos of takeoff and landing on Rumble, Odysee, YouTube, etc. The Cabin Crew will announce the specific rules so listen carefully. Large electronic devices must be stowed because they become a significant ...


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