134

"My bag has medication in which I may need during the flight" would normally be sufficient to get the cabin crew to select a different bag. You bag is more important than other people's.


96

I can think of two reasons. One, sadly, you have disallowed, which is the legroom answer. But what if the answer actually is about legroom? Since I don't have enough room for my knees, I have to straighten my legs, which requires me to put my feet under the seat in front of me. It seems to me that if passengers were supposed to put bags under their own ...


83

It happened to me once in London Heathrow. In my case I didn't have any emotional attachment to the item and it only cost around £3 to replace, so I threw it away, however I discussed with the security and the airline what my options were. They offered me the following options: Throw it away (I actually ended up doing just that) Post it to whatever ...


80

Maybe not exactly the answer to your question, but according to this site (see Section XIV, Chapter 71, HS code 7108131000), Russia imposes a 20% customs duty on the importation of gold bars. So unless you have 5.3 million rubles on hand to pay the customs duty (or can break off a fifth of the bar), expect the customs officers to hold on to your gold bar ...


76

No joke. A hoverboard these days isn't referring to flying skateboards a la Marty McFly in Back to the Future, but what Wikipedia calls self-balancing scooters: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-balancing_scooter And the equally serious reason airlines don't want these on board is that they're crammed full of lithium batteries, which have a disturbing ...


76

It is not legal to bring methadone into Canada without a prescription. Methadone is a controlled drug in Canada under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (it's in Schedule I, number 5 (4)). It is illegal to import a controlled drug into Canada without authorization (section 6, "Importing and Exporting"). The maximum punishment is life imprisonment; I ...


70

You have no right to the bin above your seat. For those exit rows where you cannot put anything beneath the seat in front of you, flight attendants will generally try to help find some space somewhere for at least your small personal item, but any passenger may be required to check their bags rather than put them in the overhead bin. It is entirely possible ...


68

Hand luggage is rarely measured and even less often weighed. It does happen and some airlines are very strict but the majority of airlines only weigh checked luggage. Before boarding most flights, there is a sizer close to the gate. It is a metal contraption that has the dimensions close to the maximum size allowed for hand luggage. Usually there are two ...


65

It's allowed, I have personally seen a passenger who booked a seat for a bag. I then asked the passenger and he said it was gold. I was an operating flight attendant. I also do not recall any rules regarding prohibiting gold onboard, (from an aviation point of view) unless it was in the shape of a knife I assume. Just check with the airline you are flying ...


58

Because it's difficult to tell apart a bottle full water from a bottle full of a chemical like hydrogen peroxide that could be used to make liquid explosives. There was one hare-brained terrorist plot that apparently tried this in 2006, and because "passenger convenience" will always lose out to "bureaucratic ass-covering" when it comes to security theater, ...


51

The gymnastics required to put your bag behind your feet in such a small space would be very interesting. Bending forward and sliding it in, sure that works. But pushing it back when you can't see and your legs are in the way? Most people are not good at bending into pretzels in 31" of space.


49

Outside of an emergency evacuation or similarly dire situation, I cannot think of any reason why a civil authority would ban a person from purchasing multiple seats. After all, it is not uncommon for people to purchase an additional seat to carry items like musical instruments or pets, or because they do not fit into a single seat. In consideration of this, ...


46

I asked https://www.facebook.com/AskTSA and they've told me that it is not allowed in carry-on bags. (12:44:55 PM) Ask TSA: We're glad you asked! Rolling pins must be packed in checked bags. Safe travels! -Kirsey (12:46:42 PM) 可买: So I cannot bring them onto the plane with my carry-on luggage? (I don't have any checked in luggage) (12:53:15 ...


42

In the US, according to the TSA you have some options: When prohibited items come through the checkpoint, passengers are given options: Take the item to the ticket counter and check it in your baggage or a box provided by the airport. Many airports have a US Postal Service or other shipping services area where boxes, stamps and envelopes can be ...


42

As JonathanReez mentioned in a now-deleted comment, the pivot point is not in your suitcase; it's part of your scissors: (source: Weebly) An alternative phrasing could read: If packed in carry-on, their blades must be less than 4 inches long.


41

I think you've misunderstood the situation a bit. The airline almost certainly allows peanut butter on board along with any other condiment. They have no reason to disallow this unless they have specific rules to avoid food allergy problems. You were referred to the airport because the more important factor is what you can take through screening at the ...


39

I measured the box in BSL and it was 21,2 x 41,2 x 58 cm (8.3" x 16.22" x 22.8"). However, the 58 cm are not exact because firstly the box has two rounded rods at the bottom, which makes it slightly smaller at these points, but it's open to the top so this dimension won't matter to much I guess.


39

If your handheld bag is small enough to go under the seat in front of you, it won't be taken from you. If you want to bring a large roll-a-bord to save checking a bag, you can do that, but keep the things you genuinely need during the flight in a separate smaller bag. Also, do not choose a seat, such as the first seat in economy, that doesn't have a "seat in ...


37

Here's what customs rules in India state (the 'free allowance' referred to is for personal items, and the duty-free allowance of alcohol cigarettes): One laptop computer (notebook computer) over and above the said free allowances mentioned above is also allowed duty free if imported by any passenger of the age of 18 years and above. So obviously, ...


37

Inconveniencing yourself never creates an argument. Inconveniencing others, does however. If you were to put your bag under your seat, you would be affecting the comfort of the passenger behind you. That passenger may not even have brought a bag on board, but now finds their comfort dependent on the whims of the passenger in front of them. I think it's easy ...


37

I mean, you've answered the question. The limit is 100ml, and your container is 118ml. It is therefore, according to the rules, not allowed. As a practical matter, I can't remember the last time anyone has paid that kind of close attention to my liquids, and there's a good chance nobody will notice or care, though this depends on the policies of whatever ...


36

Anecdotally, you can buy gold at a vending machine in Abu Dhabi airport, in the outgoing terminal. Whilst policies at destinations will vary of course, it's highly unlikely to be widely illegal whilst being sold at an airport. Gold ATMs are available across the world - not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it myself while transiting through Abu ...


35

I am a software engineer and I also test the software on many different smartphones and tablets. I fly frequently within Europe, so my answer will be limited to this area. However, this is also from west to east and east to west, outside of the Schengen region! As a Dutch citizen, I rarely need a visa to travel, which makes this easy. I do carry a lot of ...


33

As of November 2018, this answer is outdated. See this answer instead. Feeling confused is natural. Ryanair's extras are designed to confuse. Yes, buying "Priority & 2 cabin bags" does not change your baggage allowance, it only changes in what part of the aircraft the bags will be transported. If you do not pay this fee, you are allowed to bring your ...


31

There are limits that were introduced by the US Federal Aviation Administration. Those have been used as well by numerous other airlines, for example Cathay Pacific. They generally impose a limit on capacity per passenger and on top of this disallow checking them in, so you must take them into your hand luggage. If a website lists grams of Lithium, use this ...


31

There are two potential issues here: Airport security and customs. For airport security: In the UK, "Liquids include liquid or semi-liquid foods, eg soup, jam, honey and syrups" and "Liquids in containers larger than 100ml generally can’t go through security even if the container is only part full." Exemptions (e.g. essential medical purposes) don't seem ...


31

From the 1st of November Ryanair policy will change: The main thing changing is that you can no longer travel with 2 bags for free to the airplane. Details are given next You have 3 bags: 1 big bag, 1 medium bag, 1 small bag You will need to buy a checked-in bag, for the big bag and drop it off as usual. For the medium bag you have 2 options from now on: ...


30

I've had two battery packs / power banks, and travelled to several countries with several airlines, taking them as carry on, without any problem...until... Last year, I flew from Tokyo Haneda, via Beijing, China to Vancouver, Canada. In Beijing, Chinese officials sent me to a security point, where several people including myself had our power banks taken ...


30

Typically, the bins really are full because there is not enough space to fit everything if the plane is completely full and everybody uses their allowance to the fullest. Also, some overhead bins contain material for the safety procedure demonstration, etc. so you can't count on enough space being available right above your seat (and I have never heard of a ...


29

Disposable/cartridge razors are universally permitted in carry-on luggage. Here's the TSA on the topic: https://www.tsa.gov/blog/2010/08/17/safety-razors-and-disposable-razors


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