Hot answers tagged

46

There is an airport-style luggage, security, and ID check. Boarding itself doesn't exactly take one hour, just as boarding an airplane doesn't really require being there 2 hours in advance, but you need to plan for potential waiting queues, finding your way and walking to the platform, hence the advice to go there early.


33

This depends a lot on the specific route: let's look at a typical example: Shanghai to Shenzhen. In early February that's about $93 for most trains and you can get one way flights at around $94, so it's basically a wash. At this point it really comes down to travel time (10+ hours on the train, 2.5 hours on the plane), convenience of departure & arrival ...


21

As the other answer and comment explained, it is due to the size of the train station, as well as the security and ID checks. However, on the particular example, I would like to just add that many highly lucrative (and competitve) routes, e.g. Beijing-Shanghai (example cited), have much smoother experience for business travellers (with a business class ...


17

These stops are fairly common for trains running for over 10 hours. The main reasons are two-fold: maximum working time for the drivers, conductors and crews, and administrative planning. After several disasters due to driver fatigues, drivers and train conductors may not work for over 8 hours before having a required rest period (10 hours in certain cases; ...


12

On some local trains (TER), it's effectively possible to buy a ticket on-board for a higher fare (which is still 30-40% over the regular fare!). It's typically presented as a last resort rather than a service or regular sales channel (which is also why the SNCF is not especially forthcoming with this information) but there is a distinction between this ...


7

How long should I allow for, to clear Passport control and baggage reclaim ? Very difficult to predict, but it also doesn't matter. Assuming you are going into London, you have three options: Heathrow Express, TFL (formerly known as Heathrow Connect) and the Piccadilly Underground Line. None of these require you to pick a departure time up front. The ...


6

https://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/transportation/plane-or-train.htm claims that the price comparison bullet train vs. flight depends on the length of the journey: Airplane Bullet Train Explanation Fares Expensive Less Expensive For short distances, flights are more expensive than bullet trains. Discounts Often Never Bullet trains, therefore, may ...


5

Taking your question at face value: Yes, there are extensive road, rail and bus connections between USA and Canada. There are very many road crossing points on the 8,891km land border between the two countries which allow private cars to cross, and rental cars depending on rental agreements. Buses and trains run across the border between most major cities, ...


5

In my experience, which is Beijing to Shanghai, the train has always been a little bit cheaper.


5

it doesn't take anywhere close to an hour. security check is perfunctory. first they check your ticket and your ID to make sure you're using your own ticket and that your ticket is valid. yes, you go through a metal detector and you get patted down, and your bag gets x-rayed if you have one. (it is not possible to check bags.) but they don't actually care if ...


5

Hi all thanks for your answers The timing does matter, I should have mentioned that I have an onward train Journey from Kings Cross to Newcastle while I realise I don't need a timed departure from Terminal 2 I do have to catch a specific train at Kings cross as flexi or buying on the day was looking like too much of an expensive option for me. A friend of ...


4

Entry regulations in Germany are listed on the website of the Auswärtiges Amt. There, it says: No exceptions can be made for entry from virus variant areas. Those in transit from high-incidence areas and other risk areas are exempt from registration, testing and quarantine requirements under certain circumstances. This includes transit through a risk area ...


4

I'm not sure you'll find a single app that will get you everything you want. The most comprehensive app is probably Google Maps. It will have most trains, many local public networks (but by far, not at all of them), and often also includes ride-sharing services (Uber and equivalents), as well as many flights. But in many places the only option to get local ...


4

To give an update on this trip I addressed in the question- I rode in coach-class on this particular train round-trip from Columbia SC to Washington DC. I did not have to tip anyone riding in coach. You do not tip unless you specifically request or receive services. I brought my own food and drink so I didn't have to visit the dining car/restaurant. Checked ...


3

As far as steps 5, 6, 7 are described in the graphic, yes, it is the same for all trains. Identity Check Since 2012, all passenger trains in China have adopted the "real-name system" where all tickets must be purchased with an associated name (and ID number) and can only be used for the named passenger. Initially this is was only checked at ...


3

Probably not the answer you are looking for, but here is what I'm doing. When I travel to Europe, I take A LOT of apps. The app that each individual supplier provides are (often) quite useful but they only cover the services of that specific provider. Last time we went in August, we brought (for a single trip!): Airlines: United, Lufthansa, Swiss Flight ...


3

For the Netherlands: You are required to present a negative test result International train and coach passengers will be asked to present a negative test result before boarding or during the journey, but at any rate before the first stop in the Netherlands. If they are unable to do so, they will be asked to get off the train or coach at the first stop ...


1

For Germany, no formalities are required as you're only in transit. For the Netherlands, you usually need a negative PCR test (max 72 hours before entry) However, there's a loophole: travel to Düsseldorf or Duisburg and then cross the border by the RE19 train to Arnhem (so NOT an ICE or IC train), and you'll NOT need the test (SOURCE). From Arnhem, hop on ...


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