8

There is nothing explicitly stated in the rules governing the switch from EEA resident to Schengen tourist except that you need to have a passport that allows for visa-free entry. I took a course in Schengen earlier this year and asked the instructor (Elspeth Guild) what she advised clients in this situation. See below... Wouldn't that mean that I can ...


7

There's no such thing as an "entry tourist stamp", only a Schengen entry stamp or a Schengen exit stamp; third-state nationals get the same stamp no matter what their basis for entering is. (With the single exception of EEA family members holding an Article 10 card, with is not relevant for you). You do not need to cross borders in order to go from a stay ...


7

I understand that Mexican nationals enjoy 90 days in 6 months tourist stay in Schengen but this period doesn't automatically start after your long-term residence permit or visa expires You are incorrect, there's no need to reenter the Schengen area after the expiration of one's national visa. According to the Schengen Border Code: Periods of stay ...


6

Unfortunately the answer to this question is not completely clear-cut. From my reading of the actual Schengen legislation, there is no requirement that you leave the Schengen Area while transitioning from your C-visa to the D-visa. It is common and well known that one can stay within the Schengen area while transitioning between two back-to-back C visas. ...


6

You're a French citizen going to work in Japan starting in October. In august, however, you want to visit without a visa for 2 weeks, and are concerned that immigration will invariably activate your working holiday visa. I just called immigration at Narita Airport (+81-476-326-832 or +81-476-342-211) who said that this is not a problem. UPDATE: evidently ...


5

The residence permit should be perfectly fine. A jobseeker's residence permit is somewhat less usual but third country nationals who reside long-term in the EU typically only get residence permits (to be renewed every 1 to 10 years depending on the country and status) and can travel on that basis alone. They do not get visas anymore.


5

This is fine, you can visit the UK and subsequently apply for a student visa. What you CANNOT do is try to apply from within the UK. Mark and Burhan (to whom thanks) have correctly observed that the UK does not allow for in-country switches if a person's immigration status is visitor. That rule applies across the board for all types of visas. Part of ...


5

As you probably noticed, there is no explicitly requirement to do so in the Borders Code and there is no other source that would be more authoritative. Another thing to understand is that the length of stay allowed in the Schengen area is entirely defined by the visas you hold and the relevant rules and regulations. There is no notion of being granted a ...


4

It looks like the Schengen Borders Code was updated in March 2016, so it seems the relevant text is not at Article 6, paragraph 2 (rather than Article 5 paragraph 1a). Here is the link to the updated Borders Code: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=celex%3A32016R0399


4

You should be fine. Article 6, paragraph 2 of the Schengen Borders Code says: For the purposes of implementing paragraph 1, the date of entry shall be considered as the first day of stay on the territory of the Member States and the date of exit shall be considered as the last day of stay on the territory of the Member States. Periods of stay authorised ...


4

In short, you should be fine. The type D visa is not a "stay longer than 30 days" visa. It's more like a "stay longer than 90 days" visa. More properly, it is a "national" visa, meaning that it is primarily governed by national law rather than the Schengen agreements. National visas do have a role in the Schenge system, however: They are equivalent to ...


4

You can visit Schengen following the expiry of a residence permit. The Schengen clock does not tick when you have a residence permit. It starts ticking when the permit expires (and at that point your 90 days will begin). I wonder whether days before a residence permit are ever added to those after to count towards 90 total? it's theoretical because a ...


4

We have an extremely similar question already about switching from a C visa to a long-term D visa. The consensus is that these sort of switches are not regulated anywhere, so there's no reason for border officials to deny you entry. Experience from people on various forums also confirms it: My country doesn't need a visa to enter the EU/Switzerland, but I ...


4

So, just called the CBP Info centre, as well as the CBP at JFK airport According to both sources, if his visa is a combination C1/D and B2 visa, then he can stay after his contract finishes without further ado. If, however, the visas are separate, then once his contract finishes, if he wishes to remain in the US for a while as a visitor, he has to: Exit and ...


4

In theory, yes. She may receive greater-than-average scrutiny when she reenters the US. If she has specific plans for a short stay and a flight already booked to take her out of the US at the end of that stay, preferably to a destination outside North America, she will probably be fine. Still, there is a chance that she could be denied entry. She could ...


3

It sounds as though he has a C1D & B1/B2 dual visa. It is not uncommon for crew members to apply for, and be granted this dual arrangement, which exists only for C1D and B1/B2 visas. Were he to enter the US solely on the C1/D, he would be allowed to remain in the US for 29 days (even when it is after employment has ended); entering on the B1/B2 would ...


3

As per the B1-B2 visa, you are not allowed to stay within the country for greater than six months, this was easily checked in the past with the I-94 form. As of now, this form is completely electronic, but the restriction still holds. So, I'd say there are some kinks to the process. If you were to consider - "Okay, but I'll leave within 6 months and return ...


3

Confirmed YES you can change from class 457 visa to a tourist visa. Someone did it before. Scroll to last posting at bottom of page in link. However you have to apply for the change, not just combine it by yourself. If approved you would not need to fly out and return to activate it. Per Department of Immigration and Border Protection’s (DIBP), If you ...


3

Yes. Furthermore you are not required to enter through the Netherlands. You must however comply with the 90/180 rule at all times, regardless of which visa authorizes your presence in the Schengen area on any given day. You must also comply with the "duration of stay" given on each visa.


3

I am in exactly the same boat: arriving 7 weeks before my course starts from Australia. From what I have heard, as long as you can prove at immigration when you enter the UK that you are leaving before the start of your student visa, and have a good reason as to why you can come in beforehand, it should be okay. However, I don't know anyone who has done ...


3

As a Canadian citizen, you do not normally need a visa at all to enter the US temporarily for many (non-work) purposes. From Information for Canadians from the US embassy in Ottawa: Canadian citizens do not require a visa to enter the United States directly from Canada for the purposes of visiting or studying. Do note also that: A visitor who intends ...


3

Time spent under a residence permit does not count towards the short-stay limit so in principle it should be possible to get another 90 days when it expires (see Does tourist visa (90 days) apply after a long-term visa ends in Schengen countries?). In any case, leaving and reentering the Schengen area or going back home would not in itself open any right to ...


3

The 180 day calculation is on the basis of a sliding window. First, ignore any days when you were in Germany on your German residence permit. Then, for each day you're in the Schengen area, look at the 179 preceding days. If you were in the Schengen area for more than 89 of those days, you've been in the Schengen area too long. Therefore, assuming your ...


3

It doesn't look good. I would try asking at the oficina de extranjería (or, if none exists where you are, the local police station) whether they can extend your stay with a temporary residence permit, but normally Schengen short-stay visas are supposed to be extended only in case of emergency, so probably they cannot. They may have another solution, but I ...


3

The process you are referring to is the "Visa Renewal by Mail Program". This process is only available if you are applying for the same visa type as you currently have. There are also a number of other requirements which vary slightly depending on the country you are in. As you are looking to move from an F-1 visa to a B-2 visa, then you do not ...


2

You can indeed visit the Schengen area for 90 days, with a visa or on a visa-free passport, after the end of your Schengen residency permit. There is no requirement for you to leave the Schengen area before you do so. The relevant regulation is the Schengen Borders Code and in particular article 5: For intended stays on the territory of the Member ...


2

I'm currently on a J-1 visitor visa in the US, and we have similar rules. When I travelled from Canada, we were told to make sure that we got in on the J-1 and that the border agent didn't admit us on a tourist visa. With regards, to entering early or if you got admitted on the wrong visa, we were told that we would normally have to exit the country and ...


2

If on your F1 entry you get an I-94 with a specific date on it (actually you won't get a paper I-94 these days (you can get it online), but they will also stamp the date next to your entry stamp), then you will need to leave the U.S. by that date or have filed a Change of Status by that date. Note that a Change of Status may not be approved.


2

As an Australian citizen you can come to the UK as a visitor for 6 month. On arrival be honest with the border guard, tell him/her you are coming in as a tourist, leaving the country and coming back on a student visa and you will be fine. I have learnt from past experience to just always be honest with border officials and you will be fine. I'd also advise ...


2

A tourist visa would allow you to enter the UK and stay for up to three months. If you wanted to travel six weeks through the UK with a tourist visa, then stay six months with your student visa, that would seem very dodgy to me and I wouldn't try unless you get some official confirmation that it is fine. (The reason why I think it's dodgy is because you ...


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