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52

All biometric passports have serial numbers that change when issued. Per this notice from the Singaporean government, this is an ICAO requirement: https://www.ica.gov.sg/news_details.aspx?nid=12246 And since virtually all passports are now biometric, even those countries (like Singapore) that did not previously change numbers do so now. Update: Here's ...


51

From the ESTA Online Help: What if I have dual citizenship, but my non-VWP passport is expired or I do not have a passport for that country? If you have any additional passports, please enter the most recent passport information, even if that passport is expired. If you are a dual citizen but do not have a passport from another country, select the ...


43

As an Australian Citizen, your wife is generally able to visit the UK for up to six months without a visa as long as she does not plan to work or study while she's there. Visiting a critically ill relative would certainly qualify. Here's the travel advice from the Australian Government (see "entry and exit"). Unless she has some criminal or immigration ...


37

I called the Australian Passport Office, as I couldn't find this information anywhere on their website. They confirmed that passport numbers do indeed change both at a renewal and also at a passport reissue due to name change. Obviously this only applies for Australian passports; I'm unaware of whether this is a general rule for other countries.


37

If you have a sufficiently modern iPhone (eg. anything that runs iOS 9 would be fine), then enable a passcode, set "Require Passcode" to "Immediately" (so you have to enter it every time you open the phone) or something short. The phone's memory is encrypted using a key derived from the passcode. No passcode, no personally identifiable data. If you do this, ...


32

Here's what ended up happening- I flew into Glasgow from Dublin with no problems, once there I caught a bus down to London. Also with no issues. I spent a while there, saw the sights and caught up with old friends. Just like I stated I would. Then after much contemplation decided to take the leap and continue with my return trip to Iceland, consequences ...


31

I'm sorry, but you've screwed yourself well and proper here. Not only have you been refused entry three times in a row, which means that any future visa applications will be treated with extreme prejudice, but you've now illegally entered the United Kingdom as well. To expand on that last bit, just because there are no border controls between Ireland and ...


23

Yes, tampering with the passport is illegal. Post-it notes for obvious reasons not, as you say. If you alter the information in your passport, then you do something wrong. If the stamp on your Cambodian visa is not 100% on the sticker but also partly on the page, it will be even more apparent. This guy here got caught with it. After all however, it seems ...


21

This answer assumes that each of the countries allows you to be a citizen of the other two countries, and that your name is the same in all three passports. It doesn't usually matter what passport you give the airline when you book the ticket. You can generally check in for different flights on the same ticket using different passports. Each time you ...


20

None, as long as you lock your phone with a password. It took the FBI several weeks of efforts to crack an iPhone belonging to the San Bernardino mass shooter, so a random low-level thief won't have the skills or tools to access your encrypted information. I would worry more about information stolen on your laptop, although that also can be mitigated by ...


19

This is only a partial answer, but it's too long for a comment. There is a separate Guam-CNMI Visa Waiver Program that is open to citizens of certain countries, including Australia. ("CNMI" stands for Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.) There have been some proposed changes to this program under which applicants for this program will be asked, ...


18

Aas long as you leave a country with the same passport that you entered in on, then you're ok. So: Option 1: Entering Aus on Aus passport, leaving on Greek = bad Option 2: Entering on Greek, leaving on Aus = bad Option 3: Entering and leaving on Greek passport = good Option 4: Entering and leaving on Aus passport = good The reason being for counts and ...


18

As an Australian citizen, your wife does not need any kind of visa (emergency, temporary, or otherwise) to visit the UK for up to 6 months at a time. Be sure to talk to your airline about "compassionate fares" where you may be able to get a reduced rate on flights at short notice. If you are at all concerned about the details of her travel, a local travel ...


18

For days to count under a bilateral agreement but not the 90/180 rule, you must have exhausted your 90/180 rule days but not your bilateral agreement days. So you would have to finish your stay in Spain or Austria and leave the Schengen area directly from one of those countries. Spending your time in Estonia at a later time, therefore, will not be possible....


16

I occasionally talk to people from various parts of Australia. I find that there are different thicknesses in Australian accent. The thicker the accent, or the faster they talk, the harder time I may have understanding them. This applies to folks from the UK too. Different accents or speaking speeds can make it hard for me to understand. This also applies ...


14

Yes, the ban still applies. The ban applies to the person, not the citizenship. Even though as an Australian Citizen you do not need a visa to visit the UK, you are still subject to the 10 year ban, and thus can not visit. It is possible that if you were to attempt to visit the UK using your Australian passport you would be admitted on the grounds that ...


13

Definitely you should use your Australian passport in Australia and Greek passport in Greece (because for these countries you are their citizen and they don't really care if you have a dual nationality). And as others have said it's safest to use the same passport to enter and exit the country. However, in many countries the police would not check your ...


13

Yes the passport number changes upon renewal. The new passport will have it's own unique identifier i.e. its own passport number. This is a common practice. The old passport number will be invalidated and will appear as such when checked by border officers if you try to use it to travel. As an authoritative reference, the British embassy in Bern confirms ...


12

Oh I know this pain. As a citizen you can presumably count as a permanent resident (as you've not officially emigrated to any other country) of Australia, meaning that you could look at the policies of World Nomads Travel Insurance. I used them during a similar period in my life (Kiwi here).


12

It seems that it needs a full page, I figured this out by searching for Laos visa photos in google. It always showed a full page visa except for older visas where it was a stamp. I guess you will end up with two empty pages :)


11

I suspect you will be very much more conscious of your change in appearance than others are and I doubt even eye and nose surgery will have made you unrecognisable from your photograph (unless of course this was major reconstruction, say after a serious accident, rather than cosmetic). Maybe ask one or two of those around you whether there is an 'adequate'...


11

Everyone transiting at a Canadian airport is subject to Canadian immigration control (except at Vancouver, Toronto Pearson terminal 1 and Calgary, where there are dedicated transit corridors for passengers headed for US Preclearance). With the exception of a few Asian nationals holding US visas and continuing to the US through these dedicated transit ...


11

Yes: "Cuban nationals applying for admission to the United States, as well as third-country nationals, with a valid visa or other travel authorization issued by the U.S. government may be transported to the United States from Cuba. [...] This includes individuals eligible to enter the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), as administered ...


10

A few searches through this site will discover pairs of countries that don't like to see each other's stamps in your passport. If you plan things right, you can use separate passports to make this less of a worry for you. For example you might use one passport for Israel and the other for all the countries that might not like seeing an Israel stamp, or whose ...


10

From the US Embassy in Australia: http://canberra.usembassy.gov/resources/all-faqs/travel.html#license An International Driving Permit serves as proof of validation of your Australian state license and as another form of photo identification. However, you must also carry your Australian state license. Some rental car agencies require an ...


10

Places like Europe have a rule like "maximum 90 days in any 180-day period", so taking a day trip to the next country will not produce another 90 days. Other places (Japan, for example) will provide another 90 days after a weekend trip elsewhere. However, few countries appreciate people staying too long. You do not have to return to your country of origin, ...


10

You can get an extension, but not a full 90 day one. The whole point of the 90 day visa limit is that is the maximum reasonable time (according to them) for a tourist to see what they want, and prevents illegal workers from staying in the country. The US does the same thing, and so do many other countries. Now, yes, you can exit and come back in, much ...


10

The general consensus on the web seems to be that you have three options: Go through a travel agent. Apply for a visa with the Chinese embassy in your home country. Go to Hong Kong and spend a few days waiting for the visa to be processed. According to this Chinese Forums post, going via a travel agency will involve shipping your passport to a ...


10

Yes, your passport number will change. I have looked at my old and new passports (2 UK ones and 3 Australian ones) and the numbers are different for every renewal/replacement. Additionally for me, I have had different issuing offices for each one, so that may be the reason mine have changed.


10

In general the point of the medical component of travel insurance is to deal with acute treatement abroad and then if nessacery to transport you back home (flying someone home on a stretcher is not cheap). Accidents don't just happen when travelling, so if you feel the need for insurance against disablity caused by accidents then you should probablly look ...


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