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101

You were not refused entry to the UK. The airline just refused to take you there, which is lucky because, if they had taken you to the UK, it seems that you would have been refused entry.


29

When it comes to traveling within the Schengen area, a type D visa is equivalent to a regular residential permit. You are basically allowed to visit other Schengen countries for up to 90 days within a 180 day period. There are some caveats - you must carry your passport or equivalent travel documents, be able to document the purpose of your visit (going on ...


25

Humans are fallible. Even the ones that are meant to be well trained. I spent years in America on a visa that nobody recognised because there are so few in circulation (E3). I almost got arrested at a DMV because a police officer went on a power trip about me being in the country illegally because of the date on my Verizon bill being before my visa start ...


22

If I understand your question correctly, it goes along the lines of... If the Standard Visitor Visa is good for 6 months, why do people get refused when they have previously stayed for 2 or 3 months? Surely if the person leaves before their 6 months is up they cannot be an overstayer? Those refusals are not about overstaying. The refusal notice will ...


20

Your long stay visa (more than three months) falls under the lawful category for "Stays Exceeding three months": When you stay in an EU country for a long stay, usually for more than 90 days, you will generally be issued with a long-stay visa and/or a residence permit. If your long-stay visa or residence permit has been issued by a Schengen ...


17

On the personal anecdotes side I have personally applied for tourist visas to Sweden for other people WHILE the person in question simultaneously has some kind of long-term visa application in the works. Such as waiting for a residence permit (move to relative) decision and visiting as tourist during the decision time. I've been the sponsor and in the ...


16

There's several approaches you can take. They all involve some planning, and there are some extra marks of caution. Mix Schengen and non-schengen stays. The actual Schengen rules say for any given day in the Schengen area, you must have spent less than 90 out of the 180 preceeding days in the Schengen area. The EU even provides a calculator to help with ...


10

If you plan to "operate" your business over the phone, you might actually be working in Europe. That's not what a tourist does. There could be tax consequences, both home and abroad. If you can refrain from working on your business on your holiday, options might be: Apply for D visa for France or Italy, then only time in other countries counts against the ...


9

You don't need a visa, and you are not restricted to 90 days in the Schengen area. Enjoy your trip. Your wife is an EU citizen, who enjoys freedom of movement in the EU. She also has a right to enjoy that freedom of movement with her spouse, so you therefore enjoy freedom of movement in the EU if you travel with her, or if you travel to join her. The ...


9

I'm guessing the stamp you're talking about looks like this (image from Wikipedia): This is NOT A VISA, and in particular not a type D visa. It's just an entry stamp that documents when you crossed through the Schengen external borders. The D in the upper left corner simply encodes that the stamp is from a German border guard. D is the abbreviation for ...


8

Most of the questions on this site about staying on either side of a long-stay visa come from people who do not need a visa for short stays in the Schengen area (like US or Australian citizens for example). People who do need a visa, like Turkish citizens, have much less flexibility. Your type D visa isn't controlled by the Schengen regulations and the time ...


8

If you are a resident of one of the Schengen countries you can automatically travel in the other Schengen countries. This is not something you need to "acquire". In theory the 90/180 rule applies, but in practice there are no border checks between Schengen countries, and your movements are not tracked, so you are basically free to travel where you want, ...


8

I do not think that you have any reason to worry. Remember that each country sets its own criteria for visa issuance, and that the criteria are different for different types of visas. France is not part of the United States, and will not be concerned with whether you qualify for the B1/B2 visa. It will be sufficient for them that you have it. Because ...


8

There is a control at the main station but you may not be stopped. With that said, you HAVE TO have an official document with you and that's only your passport. With every other document you will have problems, since you are "illegally" visiting the country and you're undocumented. (The situation in Europe is hot because of terrorism, so it's not the best ...


8

It looks to me like your child will need a titre d'identité républicain (TIR): Le titre d'identité républicain (TIR) peut être délivré à un mineur né en France de parents étrangers titulaires d'un titre de séjour. Il lui permet de prouver son identité et d'être dispensé de visa lors de son retour en France après un voyage à l'étranger. La personne qui ...


8

(This started out as a comment, but it got rather long, and I wanted to add more) The embassy/consulate who issues visa are free to issue them with whatever validity period they like. If you haven't provided arguments for why you should get more than (e.g.) a week (I'm not sure Schengen visa can be that short) they might (and have the right to do so) think ...


8

There is no need to mention your tale of woe if the application form specifically asks if you have been refused entry to any country. Refusal of entry has a specific meaning, and should be accompanied by a stamp in the passport. So if you are using the same passport and there is no refusal stamp, then you have nothing to fear. You were simply not ...


7

This is possible by article 5 paragraph 4(a) of the Schengen Borders Code (Regulation (EC) No 562/2006) third-country nationals who do not fulfil all the conditions laid down in paragraph 1 but hold a residence permit or a re-entry visa issued by one of the Member States or, where required, both documents, shall be authorised to enter the territories of ...


7

I'll give you some of my personal experience as a white American citizen living in France on a long-stay working Visa. Standard disclaimers apply, and this isn't legal advice. Firstly, I wouldn't worry too much about border checks coming into France, and not at all while traveling in the Schengen area after you have already entered the country. Border ...


7

There's no such thing as an "entry tourist stamp", only a Schengen entry stamp or a Schengen exit stamp; third-state nationals get the same stamp no matter what their basis for entering is. (With the single exception of EEA family members holding an Article 10 card, with is not relevant for you). You do not need to cross borders in order to go from a stay ...


7

Normally, US citizens can only visit without a visa for no more than six months. Some countries allow visitors to apply for a visa to stay for longer. However, that does not appear to be true for the UK. From Standard Visitor visa: How long you can stay You can usually stay in the UK for up to 6 months. You might be able to stay for longer if: ...


7

Your Schengen visa means nothing in itself for the UK, the UK is not part of the Schengen area and governs its own immigration. Whether you need a visa or not depends on your nationality largely, you can check here: https://www.gov.uk/check-uk-visa/y Though I would assume that if you do need a visa then having a schengen visa and being a student in France ...


7

What if I exit the Schengen area and then reenter as a tourist? Yes you can do that. You must exit before or when your visa expires. Go somewhere else and then make your visa free entry request. Whether they let you in or not is just speculation at this point but if you are able to convince them to let you in, there is no rule you're breaking.


6

Schengen Visa Validity Schengen visas act as both entry and stay permits (I.e. there is no distinction between the two as is the case for USA. for example.). Hence your visa is valid until the 24th April, and you must leave the country no later than at 23:59 of that day. I understand how it might be confusing since you are told two metrics: validity dates ...


6

As others suggested, you are allowed to travel in other Schengen states while complying with the 90/180 rule. This is also stated on the site of Poland Ministry of Foreign Affairs: The national D-type visa entitles the holder to: stay in the territory of Poland throughout the period of its validity; additionally move within the territory of ...


6

As per German visa regulations published by the German Foreign Office (scroll down the link): As a result of Regulation 265/2010 it is now possible for anyone in possession of a national visa (D visa) and a valid travel document to move freely in the Schengen area up to three months in any six‑month period. https://www.auswaertiges-amt.de/en/...


6

The point of the Schengen agreement was to abolish border checks and create a single (short-stay) visa policy, which has mostly been achieved, but not necessarily to create actionable rights for non-EU citizens. There is therefore no “right to free movement” in the Schengen area as such. There is something called the “freedom of movement” in the European ...


6

I believe the “Valid for: Italia” on the visa stamp is no big deal. It always says so because your visa is not valid, e.g. to study in Sweden the whole time. But (all?) D visas really are valid for short-term travel to other Schengen countries and also exempt the holder from any short-stay visa requirement when crossing an external border. At the same time, ...


6

Yes, you will be free to travel in the Schengen Area using your national "D" type visa. Legal basis: Regulation EU No 265/2010 of the European Parliament and of the Council amending the Convention Implementing the Schengen Agreement and Regulation (EC) No 562/2006 as regards movement of persons with a long-stay visa The Regulation enters into force on 5 ...


6

You can only get a refund, if your permanent residence is outside the EU; the item is more than 50 EUR, the item is unused, and it has been less than 90 days since you bought it. A "D" visa (which is a long stay visa - longer than 90 days at a time) is not a permanent residence visa; and a mvv (which is a residence permit) is only required in certain ...


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