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17

Your mother's green card allows her to be in the US, and to enter the US, but it has no relevance to Japan. Thus, with an expired Chinese passport and a US green card, she will be denied boarding for the Guam > Japan flight.


13

While the concept is interesting, it is unlikely except perhaps in very limited cases. The issue is that it is difficult to prevent you from leaving an airport. So, when boarding, you would have to meet the requirements of the destination country of your ticket. Simply telling the agent that you don't intend to leave will not make them waive pre-boarding ...


12

This document states: All tourists are required to hold a negative PCR test for COVID-19 conducted 96 hours prior the scheduled time of departure from the first port of embarkation enroute to Maldives. If the tourist makes a transit during the journey, the initial PCR test will be valid if the transit does not exceed 24 hours. If the tourist makes a ...


11

She does not have a passport, so it's possible that she will not be able to board the flight to Japan. A "domestic" flight from Guam to Mainland USA might be possible, but what you're describing is technically an "international" flight to Japan followed by another international flight to USA. If nothing goes wrong, you probably won't have ...


9

So I wonder whether it would be possible to travel from transit zone to transit zone, No. When boarding a flight from A to B, the airline MUST check whether you meet immigration and Covid requirements for your destination country and will decline boarding if you can't show these. If you have a "good" passport you may be able to get away with the ...


8

I have to applaud your inventiveness and perseverance on this topic. The issue is that the airline won't sell you #1 as a single "trip", but rather as two separate trips (outbound and inbound) on the same ticket, i.e. a return ticket. So when you check-in at CMB, they'll consider your final destination for that trip to be GRU, so shouldn't apply ...


7

Strictly speaking, no. The link to the Department's web page for exit requirements about travel to New Zealand contains this note: Note: This provision is only applicable when New Zealand is the destination of travel. If you are transiting through New Zealand to another destination you must apply for an outward travel exemption. In practice, once you have ...


4

Your residence card does not suffice for visa-free transit in the UK. The Guide from the UK government to airlines mentions explicitly the need for a common format residence permit, that is, a credit card-sized plastic card or sticker in passport with either a bull (old format) or an European map (new format) on it. The only residence permit issued pursuant ...


4

If I were you I would get a visa. The document you have is not an EEA family permit, which was the name the UK gave to the documents that it issued like the document you have, but the UK never used that name to denote such documents issued by other countries. The document you have is not a common-format residence permit. It is certainly a residence permit, ...


4

This is not practical because many airlines will check if you have the right to enter your destination country. In theory you could book the entire trip before leaving, and claim that your destination country is the same as your home country, but your question was about booking onward travel when already partway through the journey.


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