66

Your problem statement sounds like the beginnings of a huge mess that would potentially take years to untangle. When talking to immigration, your best strategy is to always answer truthfully when asked a specific question. If asked for how long you're planning to stay, answer the exact date. If asked whom you're planning to visit, answer that you're visiting ...


26

Japanese citizens can travel to the USA on the Visa Waiver Program/ESTA, and I assume this is what you are intending to do. When entering the USA on ESTA, no matter what you tell the CBP officer about the length of your intended stay, if they let you in you will usually be allowed to stay 90 days. Exceptions do happen, but they are not very common. This is ...


14

I have actually been in very similar situation and have traveled many times to the US to visit my girlfriend through the Visa Waiver Program/ESTA (I am from Germany, but I don't think that makes a big difference). The longest I stayed was about 2 months right after I finished university. I always told them how long I planned to stay and the purpose of my ...


10

A Tier 5 (Your Mobility Scheme) visa cannot be extended, so your friend's permission to remain in the UK will expire on March 14. If he overstays for a few weeks it is unlikely that it will have any immediate consequences (as in, police won't round him up and remove him by force, and he won't be fined when he eventually laves) -- but it will make it much ...


9

Japanese passport holders have visa free access to the Schengen Area and the UK, he will just have to go in a separate queue at immigration for non-EU passport holders and get a stamp in his passport. Do Japanese passport holders need a schengen visa? Do Japanese passport holders need a UK visa?


6

As a Japanese citizen, your girlfriend does not need a visa to visit the UK: You won’t need a visa to come to the UK You can stay in the UK for up to 6 months without a visa. However, you should bring the same documents you’d need to apply for a visa, to show to officers at the UK border. You may want to apply for a visa if you have a ...


6

The US accepts the idea of dual citizenship (sort of reluctantly, but they do). If the immigration official asks on entering the US where you have been, say China. In the event that the immigration officer notices that you don't have a corresponding entry stamp for China in your US passport, you can say you used a different passport.


4

I would just use the Australian passport. Australians don't need a visa to visit Japan for up to 90 days, so there is no need to show multiple passports anywhere in the process. Source: my children are dual Australian/Japanese citizens (legally, since they're still underage) and have entered Japan using an Australian passport.


4

The ESTA application is referring to national identity cards as listed in this Wikipedia page, not visas. More specifically, Mexico does not have a national identity card system, and your permanent visa for Mexico does not count as one.


3

You will need to show a passport on three or four occasions. On check-in. Here, the agent has to confirm that you meet the requirements to be admitted to Japan and that you are the person on the booking. You want to show the agent your Japanese passport as it confirms you are eligible to enter Japan in the easiest way possible. (In case the romanisation of ...


3

To avoid any troubles on this trip, you should enter Japan using your Australian passport. Now, regarding being a dual national is technically illegal, and your comment to the other post: There was one news article that said that Japan had never actually enforced the dual citizenship rule and stripped a person of their Japanese citizenship but a lot of ...


3

If you renew your Japanese passport and are able to keep your old one, then yes, you can use your old and new passports together for travel to and from China. This is stated in Timatic, a database used by airlines checking passengers. Valid visas or resident permits in expired passports are accepted if holding a new valid passport of the same ...


3

Theoretically, yes, you must use a Japanese passport. According to the Immigration Control and Refugee Recognition Act, Article 60 and 61 on Chapter 7 (English translation): Article 60 (1) Any Japanese national (except for crew members) who departs from Japan with the intention of proceeding to an area outside of Japan shall possess a valid ...


2

Japan, like most countries, cannot deny entry to verified citizens of their own. According to one anecdotal report, a dual national, upon being verified as a dual national (as he didn't have a Japanese passport on them, it took a while), was told that he's "supposed to use their Japanese passport". So it seems that officials would want your children to use ...


2

Yes, your sequence is correct. At least, it's what I do all the time and never had any problems. Always use your US passport to leave and enter the US. Always enter and leave a country on the same passport. Obvious: if you need a visa, make sure you use the passport that has the visa in it. Check in for a flight with the passport that you will use to enter ...


2

According to the EU Visa Policy page and documents linked on it describing and clarifying this policy. Citizens of Japan are not required to be in possession of a visa to enter Schengen Area (including Hungary, Germany, and Czech Respublic) for a short term stay (<90 days contiunous and 90/180 rule still applies).


2

The US does not have exit control so she does not need to show her US passport on the way out. For the airline it does (mostly) only matter that she has the right passport (and if needed visa) for her destination. If asked why she does not have a visa for the US, she (or you if you are there) can show her expired US passport. Before she comes to the US ...


2

Yes, the Japanese passport lets you visit China visa free. Just follow the guidance here: I have two passports/nationalities. How do I use them when I travel?


2

So I answered the questions in the application as below. These questions were asked after filling out all the information from their passports including their birthplace which is Japan. Q: ARE YOU NOW, A CITIZEN OR NATIONAL OF ANY OTHER COUNTRY? A: Yes (Both of my children have dual(Japanese/Canadian) citizenship) Q:COUNTRY OF CITIZENSHIP / NATIONALITY ...


1

No N/A The Canadian citizenship is "through parents." The Japanese citizenship I'm not sure about because I don't know much about Japanese citizenship law. I suspect that "through parents" is correct because had you not been a Japanese citizen I think they wouldn't either, even though they were born in Japan. But I doubt many US officers would understand ...


1

The Philippine authorities are responsible for enforcing their country's immigration rules, not Japan's. Since you're a citizen of their country they should not have a problem with you leaving. (Actually I seem to vaguely recall that Philippine authorities do have a problem with some of their citizens traveling abroad, in particular young women. That doesn'...


1

Yes. JAL for example allows unaccompanied travel from age 5 upwards. What age does my child have to be to qualify as an unaccompanied minor? Unaccompanied minor service is mandatory for a child age 5-11 traveling without an adult. Children ages 12-17 years are not required to travel as unaccompanied minors, but the service is optional for this age ...


1

To answer the question posted in the title: yes you can. If you are admitted into the USA, you will get a "admit until date". This date might be stamped into your passport and also will be accessible in your electronic I-94 record. Up until that date you can stay in the USA legally. This is a convoluted world. If you lie to the CBP they will catch you, they ...


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