73

Or can I just dial +92... as usual? Yes. Although it is the + prefix that's the "magic" here. It is short hand for the outbound international dialling code for whatever country you are dialling from. This is what allows you to use the same (international format) phone number anywhere in the world. If you are calling from the US then the phone network ...


46

No. Most Japanese people do NOT speak Korean. However, the English language is a required subject in the Japanese secondary education; although English education has not gone very well for Japanese people, in general, most people can understand at least a little bit of English (except, of course, the very old people). (EDIT: As commenters reminded me, there ...


35

Yes, you can use PMR446 walkie-talkies in Switzerland. Usage of PMR446 in Europe is licensed on a country-by-country basis and not mainly by the EU. You can get an up to date list of European countries allowing PMR446 usage and a summary of national deviations from the European Communications Office. Swiss federal authorities also have an information page ...


26

You can just dial as usual, just like you would to call him at home, and the call will go through. But you'll be charged for an international call, however your cell phone plan handles international roaming. You may find it makes more sense to plan in advance to use Skype, WhatsApp, WeChat, etc..., which will use only your data connection (or wifi) and not ...


23

If you send a text or make a call to a US number, you'll pay whatever you normally pay to send a text or make a call to a US number. It does not matter whether the phone associated with that number is in the US or not at the time. The recipient of that text or call may have to pay extra fees for receiving it internationally, depending on their carrier and ...


20

Generally The simple answer is: you can't...from a normal phone. Toll-free numbers are specific to the phone exchange system of a particular country and thus when calling from a VOIP phone provider like Skype or calling from a different country's network the call won't get routed through correctly. Your alternative to insist on asking for the version of the ...


20

+1 917-222-2222 is the best form. You may use spaces instead of the hyphens. The form is: First group: a plus sign followed by your region's international calling code. Second group: your area code (which locals would know to omit). The rest: what everyone needs to type. The important part for international callers is to have the country prefix first, ...


18

To tackle the second part of your question first, we have previously covered this ground on WiFi / 3G coverage in Europe in the following questions: Are there companies that offer worldwide WiFi roaming for a fixed fee? (I might also point out specifically here to look at FON, linked to by Andra in the question itself, in addition to the answers.) Is there ...


17

If you have a GSM phone (with a SIM-card), 112 is likely to work in many places (see the list in the link). Note that it will work whether you're roaming, or don't have a SIM in the phone at all and the phone is locked. That's basically the only number you're guaranteed by the GSM standard to always be able to dial, and the mobile operators are required to ...


15

I think there are two views here. Firstly, the backpacker as we know it is changing, or splitting. There are still the 'true', 'hardcore' backpackers, who want to hitchhike everywhere with two pairs of socks and three shirts and a sleeping roll on their back. That's great, but it's not for everyone. As hostels become more ubiquitous, wifi appears ...


14

First off, I would use Skype, Google Voice (through GMail outside the US) or any other VOIP-like provider. They offer a tariff of ~2c/min and ~30c/min (mobile) for calling to Italian numbers. Obviously if the other person has Skype, you only pay for the internet connection. Your only problem then would be to get an affordable prepaid mobile data plan unless ...


14

You can find the list of phones in the Wikipedia: Emergency_telephone_number For most countries in Europe is 112


14

The form you've written is the least confusing. +1 is the country code for the US and 917 is your area code in NYC, but leaving them out accomplishes nothing. Locals will know which ones they can drop (actually, in your case none, because NYC uses 10 digit dialing to increase available numbers). It is impossible to screw up a phone number by providing too ...


14

We in the Middle East follow international standards :) Shaking head means no, nodding means yes, thumbs up means thumbs up, middle finger means the same as in the US, same as in the V sign. That's not the case for "crossing fingers", which could be interpreted as vagina, but only when the context is about that. Also, the "OK" sign means "I will kill you ...


12

Update August 2017: This offer seems to have disappeared. Roaming is now free in the EU (withing “fair use” limits), as required by law. Rules for roaming in other countries depend on the specific product but even merely receiving calls will incur charges in most places (I checked the US and Turkey systematically and a few others in a more cursory way) and ...


11

If you want to get up to watch the northern lights, rather than staying out all night I would suggest staying outside of town, otherwise you will have a lot of light pollution. on the topic of light pollution Check the phase of the moon and its location. I used Stellarium for the location and just google 'moon phases' to make sure It's isn't going to be a ...


11

I'd propose the "null hypothesis" that 2FABE has no special meaning, but that postal services may just handle postcards that don't have postage, either because they don't really check, or as a "tourist-friendly" policy. One could test this by sending a bunch of postcards, some marked 2FABE, some marked with other random sequences of characters, and some ...


11

Google Voice — $0.01/min. The way it works is you can call online or call a local US number that will call the Chinese number for you (which would use your minutes or your normal per minute cost on top of the $0.02). Your girlfriend could call you online using it as well, if you set up an account for her in the US (it can't be set up outside). That ...


11

German ICEs have some coaches that are considered to be "quiet zones" and some coaches are "talking zone". There are symbols on the walls that tell you what zone you are in. The symbols can be seen here: http://www.bahn.de/p/view/service/zug/handy_u_ruhebereiche.shtml So technically having a telecon is allowed in the "talking zones". For fairness, it is ...


10

I'm just adding this in on the off chance that the US is the same as Australia, hopefully this is helpful. If you have a place in your city like a China Town that has plenty of Chinese shops you can get very cheap calls by purchasing Chinese calling cards. Many Chinese grocery stores have posters stuck up with call rates. This is very common in my local ...


10

Fret not, travel.stackexchange.com works just fine :D For other services, however, currently there are over 2700 sites blocked in Mainland China. Wikipedia maintains a list of popular sites or services blocked in mainland China. Pretty much all Google services, Yahoo, Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and more - see the list for details. I can confirm ...


10

Commonly, emergency phone numbers like 911 in the US or 112 in most European countries can not be called from abroad. Even within the country, emergency calls are usually handled completely different in the phone network, allowing the calls to be connected with priority, routed to the closest dispatcher centre and passing on details about the caller like e.g....


9

My own best way to avoid data roaming fees when travelling is simply NOT to bring a cell phone abroad. Making a phone call is easy from anywhere without a cell phone and internet connections are provided in many places in cybercafés. Moreover, this is one object that you won't get stolen if it stays at home.


9

The best explanation for this phenomenon I've found is this: For your information, most of the postcards that are being sent with "student to student" recommendation from your website that arrive get a circled black 'T' letter stamp on them which means "postage is due" and that destination should pay it. This means that the receiver of such mail might ...


9

I think you have to ask yourself two questions? How connected do you want to be and how much are you willing to carry. Unless you are doing heavy work, a laptop should not be an option, it is way too heavy. Do you write a lot? A travelog, long emails? - take a Netbook Do you always need to be connected? Do you plan to use Google maps to find your hotel when ...


9

If it's a true international toll-free number then it will have Country code +800 - Universal International Freephone Numbers (UIFN). These numbers are toll-free from any country that participates in the UIFN scheme and from which the number's owner elects to receive calls. UIFN number must be provisioned by the owner for each individual country they intend ...


9

You've got three options: The JR West free wifi service at the stations seems like your best shot, as far as I can tell you can surf the Internet freely once you've got it set up. You can also sort out Internet access on the train itself, but it's a bit of a pain. First, you need to sign up for a Wi2 300 account, ¥380/month, which gets you access to the UQ ...


9

According to the Schiphol website there are a some public phones throughout the airport. You will need a credit card, or euro coins. Seeing the prices, I think it is far easier to have them call you by their mobile phone, or maybe send a text message. Public telephones Public telephones are available throughout Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. They work on ...


9

The main ones I could think of are (can be applied to any foreign land): Never talk about politics & religion. Never talk bad about women / class / races. Never make negative comments on their culture, food, habits, norms. Never talk about the army or the police, spies and government. Btw, I have never been to China, although have traveled other few ...


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