76

Or can I just dial +92... as usual? Yes. Although it is the + prefix that's the "magic" here. It is short hand for the outbound international dialling code for whatever country you are dialling from. This is what allows you to use the same (international format) phone number anywhere in the world. If you are calling from the US then the phone network ...


48

For all countries, you can just dial 112. Dialling 112 will direct you to the same emergency call centre as phoning the country's emergency number would. In the EU, emergency call centres must provide a translations service. In some countries, a phone does not even need to have a SIM card present to dial 112. 112 (emergency telephone number): 112 is a ...


46

No. Most Japanese people do NOT speak Korean. However, the English language is a required subject in the Japanese secondary education; although English education has not gone very well for Japanese people, in general, most people can understand at least a little bit of English (except, of course, the very old people). (EDIT: As commenters reminded me, there ...


35

Yes, you can use PMR446 walkie-talkies in Switzerland. Usage of PMR446 in Europe is licensed on a country-by-country basis and not mainly by the EU. You can get an up to date list of European countries allowing PMR446 usage and a summary of national deviations from the European Communications Office. Swiss federal authorities also have an information page ...


28

If you send a text or make a call to a US number, you'll pay whatever you normally pay to send a text or make a call to a US number. It does not matter whether the phone associated with that number is in the US or not at the time. The recipient of that text or call may have to pay extra fees for receiving it internationally, depending on their carrier and ...


26

You can just dial as usual, just like you would to call him at home, and the call will go through. But you'll be charged for an international call, however your cell phone plan handles international roaming. You may find it makes more sense to plan in advance to use Skype, WhatsApp, WeChat, etc..., which will use only your data connection (or wifi) and not ...


20

+1 917-222-2222 is the best form. You may use spaces instead of the hyphens. The form is: First group: a plus sign followed by your region's international calling code. Second group: your area code (which locals would know to omit). The rest: what everyone needs to type. The important part for international callers is to have the country prefix first, ...


19

The information about 112 in another answer is correct. It is also true of 911, so to address your concerns explicitly, not sure if I will be able to call the local emergency number (USA - 911) using a foreign (India) mobile number when I am in USA. You will be able to do that. If your phone does not recognize 911 as an emergency number, it sends the ...


16

Generally, you dial (international access code) + (country code) + (8 digit number). The country code for Singapore is 65 (easy to google). The international access code from the US is 011. From a cell phone the + key can replace the international access code.


14

The form you've written is the least confusing. +1 is the country code for the US and 917 is your area code in NYC, but leaving them out accomplishes nothing. Locals will know which ones they can drop (actually, in your case none, because NYC uses 10 digit dialing to increase available numbers). It is impossible to screw up a phone number by providing too ...


14

We in the Middle East follow international standards :) Shaking head means no, nodding means yes, thumbs up means thumbs up, middle finger means the same as in the US, same as in the V sign. That's not the case for "crossing fingers", which could be interpreted as vagina, but only when the context is about that. Also, the "OK" sign means "I will kill you ...


13

Generally when calling internationally there are three parts to the number you dial. The international dialiing prefix for the country you are calling from. In North america this is "011" (in much of the rest of the world it is 00). When calling from a mobile phone you can use the special symbol "+" instead of the international dialing prefix, this is ...


12

Update August 2017: This offer seems to have disappeared. Roaming is now free in the EU (withing “fair use” limits), as required by law. Rules for roaming in other countries depend on the specific product but even merely receiving calls will incur charges in most places (I checked the US and Turkey systematically and a few others in a more cursory way) and ...


12

Commonly, emergency phone numbers like 911 in the US or 112 in most European countries can not be called from abroad. Even within the country, emergency calls are usually handled completely different in the phone network, allowing the calls to be connected with priority, routed to the closest dispatcher centre and passing on details about the caller like e.g....


11

German ICEs have some coaches that are considered to be "quiet zones" and some coaches are "talking zone". There are symbols on the walls that tell you what zone you are in. The symbols can be seen here: http://www.bahn.de/p/view/service/zug/handy_u_ruhebereiche.shtml So technically having a telecon is allowed in the "talking zones". For fairness, it is ...


10

Fret not, travel.stackexchange.com works just fine :D For other services, however, currently there are over 2700 sites blocked in Mainland China. Wikipedia maintains a list of popular sites or services blocked in mainland China. Pretty much all Google services, Yahoo, Dropbox, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and more - see the list for details. I can confirm ...


10

My friend had to get an ambulance for me last year, she called 911, her local police department contacted my local Garda station and they took it from there, although I'm pretty sure this is completely discretionary, and in an emergency where time is of the essence, probably wouldn't be the best idea. The Gardaí Headquarters number is +353 1 666 0000, This ...


9

You've got three options: The JR West free wifi service at the stations seems like your best shot, as far as I can tell you can surf the Internet freely once you've got it set up. You can also sort out Internet access on the train itself, but it's a bit of a pain. First, you need to sign up for a Wi2 300 account, ¥380/month, which gets you access to the UQ ...


9

According to the Schiphol website there are a some public phones throughout the airport. You will need a credit card, or euro coins. Seeing the prices, I think it is far easier to have them call you by their mobile phone, or maybe send a text message. Public telephones Public telephones are available throughout Amsterdam Airport Schiphol. They work on ...


9

The best explanation for this phenomenon I've found is this: For your information, most of the postcards that are being sent with "student to student" recommendation from your website that arrive get a circled black 'T' letter stamp on them which means "postage is due" and that destination should pay it. This means that the receiver of such mail might ...


9

The main ones I could think of are (can be applied to any foreign land): Never talk about politics & religion. Never talk bad about women / class / races. Never make negative comments on their culture, food, habits, norms. Never talk about the army or the police, spies and government. Btw, I have never been to China, although have traveled other few ...


8

Naver provides one: see here. It also provides a English-Korean dictionary: link's here.


8

Yes, you should dial +92, as usual.


7

Verizon locks their phones, so you can not buy a foreign sim card and use it with your device. Actually Verizon with this "Global Ready" feature they mean you can activate the international plan (must be expensive) and then you can use the phone while abroad. This means VERY expensive calls and data usage. I strongly recommend that you buy a cheap phone or ...


7

Here are some tips I've gathered from staying in a lot of dorms: If it's possible, try and get a bottom bunk and put a sheet/towel up, creating a "tent", so that if someone does turn the light on you aren't as disturbed. Lock your stuff - if lockers aren't available, store everything on your bed during the day. I'm not sure which countries you are ...


7

The Wikipedia article on this subject is often incorrect. For up to date info on which sites are blocked, I suggest you look at https://en.greatfire.org/ who actually test the sites availability. The main ones your will miss are Google (everything including Gmail and Play App store on your phone), YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Blogger, Blogspot, Wordpress, ...


7

On most airplanes with cellular and Wi-Fi capabilities, the ability to make mobile phone calls is technically disabled and passengers are prohibited from using the Wi-Fi service to make VoIP calls using services like Skype. Small point - Skype is not VoIP (in the technical sense). It uses its own proprietary protocol. It is not airlines that prohibit ...


7

In the United States, you can make an emergency 911 phone call from a mobile phone without a SIM. As long as your phone can communicate with the network (supports the same frequency and standard), you can call 911. This is governed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The FCC's basic 911 rules require wireless service providers to transmit all ...


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