Hot answers tagged

80

No, your carrier is not breaking the policy : https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/consumers/internet-telecoms/mobile-roaming-costs/index_en.htm Here are the relevant parts : The limit is calculated on the basis of the retail price of your domestic mobile bundle as in the case of unlimited data. The roaming data volume must be at least twice the ...


79

AT&T can't charge you to use WiFi. From the page you linked to, that's talking about a service where you connect to WiFi somewhere (like an airport) that you might normally have to pay for, and the provider of that WiFi has partnered with AT&T to allow AT&T customers to log in and use the WiFi. This does not affect your ability to connect to any ...


73

Or can I just dial +92... as usual? Yes. Although it is the + prefix that's the "magic" here. It is short hand for the outbound international dialling code for whatever country you are dialling from. This is what allows you to use the same (international format) phone number anywhere in the world. If you are calling from the US then the phone network ...


54

My experience when I use data roaming is that the local telco tunnels IP traffic to my home provider, and then it enters the global internet at my provider's premises. So sites like whatismyip.com geolocate me to Denmark, even when I'm using data roaming in, say, England. It would stand to reason that the same thing happens when you're roaming with a ...


35

I traveled all the way through the USA from the east coast to the west coast, by car and RV. I thought about getting a UMTS / LTE stick for my Notebook, too. But there really wasn't any need for this. You can get FREE WIFI almost everywhere: Coffee Shops (Starbucks, etc.) Fast food Restaurants (Pizza Hut, McDonalds, KFC, etc.) Camp grounds Hotels Shops / ...


26

You can just dial as usual, just like you would to call him at home, and the call will go through. But you'll be charged for an international call, however your cell phone plan handles international roaming. You may find it makes more sense to plan in advance to use Skype, WhatsApp, WeChat, etc..., which will use only your data connection (or wifi) and not ...


23

You can walk into any large carrier store - AT/T or T-Mobile in your case (since you probably have a GSM phone), and ask for a prepaid SIM card. No address proof, I don't even think they check your ID. T-Mobile usually has the best deals (value for money) and their 3G/4G network is pretty fast. Of course, I am assuming you have an unlocked GSM phone. T-...


22

Many years ago, it was highly unlikely that a European cell / mobile phone would work in the US. More recently, but still quite long ago, your phone might work if it supported the US bands. In both cases, the answer might have varied from state to state or city to city. These days, you are unlikely to experience a problem. Phones are now much more ...


21

No, the EU roaming directive doesn't require providers to allow roaming with any network provider, so agreements between providers are still in force - the directive does include provisions for managing wholesale prices between providers but does not go as far as mandating open roaming.


16

Here is a clear case of the representative being asked a question they don't know the answer to. As others have pointed out, their training is minimal. They are not allowed to admit not knowing except in very extreme cases as that would be bad for the corporate image. If they say "It will be free" and is wrong, the customer (you) will be very very angry ...


12

The person calling you will be calling your Australian number, so they will be charged whatever they normally pay for a call to Australia. As you are roaming, you will be charged for receiving the call at whatever your roaming rate is. In most cases, the call itself will actually route via Australia and back to wherever you are! It's possible that if your ...


12

Boingo offers "worldwide" Wi-Fi, with fixed fee, per minute, pay-as-you-go, and package deals. Their full plan listing is here. It starts at $7.95/month for unlimited worldwide access for two mobile devices. I've not used the service and am not affiliated, but have them bookmarked for my own travels.


12

Update August 2017: This offer seems to have disappeared. Roaming is now free in the EU (withing “fair use” limits), as required by law. Rules for roaming in other countries depend on the specific product but even merely receiving calls will incur charges in most places (I checked the US and Turkey systematically and a few others in a more cursory way) and ...


12

Well, as much as I'd suggest to not blindly trust EU websites (been there, done that) you can find all answers you seek on this FAQ on Roam like at home regulation: it's the more recent I can find, and it's straight from the EU itself. https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/faq/frequently-asked-questions-roam-home Now, link only answers are frowned ...


11

Now that I'm back from my trip I thought I'd add my own answer with details of the experience. All of the following is using an iPhone 4S, unlocked and using T-Mobile's Simple Choice plan (originally an AT&T locked phone). On landing at Heathrow I turned off airplane mode and my phone immediately connected to EE. I've seen reports that this could take ...


11

It's not clear. As far as I know, nothing has been ruled out or abolished, it's just that announced dates for vote/approval for new measures slip and nothing has happened yet. There were no further mandatory price cuts planned in the current regulation after the ones that took place last year and therefore no strict timeline. But the idea is still in the air....


10

What you're probably looking for is often called a "Roaming SIM" or "International SIM". These have numbers for multiple countries attached to them, and generally lower costs to make/receive calls (and sometimes also texts and data) in those countries. Depending on the one you go for, they may have varying numbers of countries covered from the start, and ...


10

In Germany I recommend buying a pre-paid SIM from a provider called simyo because they allow you to tether (so do a number of other providers, but with simyo I'm 100% positive because I use their service on a regular basis). 39 euros buys you unlimited calling to all landlines and mobile networks within Germany (including text messages) plus unlimited ...


10

In addition to the other answers: Check the roaming charges for your provider/subscription. They can be extraordinarily high. The biggest issue is data, as your phone can use a lot of data without you even noticing or even doing anything actively on your phone (background updates of apps, e-mail...). Providers often given data rates using units such as MB ...


10

This is an excellent site I'd visited to figure out which SIM cards would work on my parents' Mi A1 phones in Canada - https://willmyphonework.net/. If you are looking for roaming, it might be expensive. You are probably better off getting a US SIM (T-Mo, Ultra Mobile etc.) and using it for the duration of your stay. Your choice, of course, but just a ...


10

Data connections from Chinese SIM cards are routed through China. I confirmed this by my own experience and it has been common knowledge among Chinese travellers for quite some time now. A few years ago this apparently wasn't the case because I remember reading news articles about the change. Likewise (though not confirmed) using a foreign SIM card in China ...


9

After further research on my own I found an interesting option. The companies simyo and blau.de offer a prepaid roaming plan in Germany for the European Union. See for example here for simyo. You can buy a package for 20 Euros that covers 150 minutes calling 150 text messages 300 MB data valid 8 days You can also buy 50 MB (valid for 7 days) for 5 Euros. ...


9

From my personal experience while travelling in Western Europe (Czech, France, Germany, Belgium, Netherlands, Austria,Slovakia, Slovenia, Swiss and Italy) if I recall correctly, they all have around 3 or 4 networks in their country but Vodafone is more common among them. I use O2-de, and when I roam I observe that I usually can connect to only one (if the ...


8

I just got a vodafone.it prepaid SIM with unlimited (or maybe several GB of) data for less than 30€. I'm fairly certain that was the best data plan available for my travels in Italy. You can get it at a Vodafone store in Italy. The Vodafone network in Como/Garda/Verona is very good. I can confirm that data roaming between Germany, Austria, Switzerland, ...


8

Is it always the case that every single national border crossing means you need a new SIM card to avoid impractically high fees? Not always, there are some international service providers that charge no roaming fees - in Africa. I'm not aware of any such offers in Europe. Most of the questions I've seen about this are from before the recent EU ...


8

I recently traveled from Belgium to San Francisco. I'm not sure whether it's the same as over there, but we had free WiFi in our hotel and in about every café, restaurant or tourist location we visited. Some Belgian providers have certain deals for mobile usage in the US. At Mobistar, there's a monthly plan with lower prices for texting, calling (in & ...


8

I went through some contacts and I got an answer form an engineer who oversees the roaming (at another provider's). Her answer is yes, the card needs to be active on the local (national) network at least once so that it is registered with the HLR (Home Location Register). It then can roam. I will take it as an authoritative answer.


8

Yes, you should dial +92, as usual.


7

I'm not sure whether this is what you're looking for as it does not offer access for a 'fixed' fee, but Skype has a feature called Skype Access that allows you to login to paid WiFi hotspots around the world and pay for them using Skype credit in your account. The advantage, of course, is that you don't need to enter your payment details. Still, you'll need ...


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