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At first, I thought it would be sort of difficult to answer this. The only options are hotel WiFi and 4G/LTE, and it's not always easy to do much about the speed of those. (Except for the fact that the speed given by various 4G/LTE carriers may vary, so you could check reviews of those before picking your carrier.) Then I remembered something called ...


78

I think that the websites are confusing terms. I have also seen this on AirBnb where places have separate checks for WiFi and Internet. I think that what they actually mean is: WiFi - non-wired internet access Internet - Wired internet access As someone who deals with computers on a daily basis for work, these types of bad definitions annoy the hell out ...


58

If the security is password only, the answer is that you can't: if they're logging your keystrokes, your password will be compromised, period. However, the best two-factor authentication system while on the road is not SMS, but app-based authentication like Google Authenticator. All you need is your mobile phone for generating the codes, and it doesn't even ...


46

I actually know of a hotel, which has free WiFi but charges for Internet access. Through the free WiFi, you can access the hotel's internal entertainment system, order room service, check out, "call" the front desk, etc. But if you want to connect to the Internet, you have to pay an extra fee (which you can also book through the free WiFi). As soon as you ...


35

I traveled all the way through the USA from the east coast to the west coast, by car and RV. I thought about getting a UMTS / LTE stick for my Notebook, too. But there really wasn't any need for this. You can get FREE WIFI almost everywhere: Coffee Shops (Starbucks, etc.) Fast food Restaurants (Pizza Hut, McDonalds, KFC, etc.) Camp grounds Hotels Shops / ...


35

There are few workarounds in this situation : ask the front desk to allocate a room next to a WiFi hot spot. This will allow you to bypass coverage problems (from one room to another, the coverage will be drastically different). use the WiFi during low trafic period (this is good sense) so between 12 PM and 6 PM or in the middle of the night. buy a SIM card ...


31

My experience with China's internet has been to have alternative solutions ready if you need access to Google's services. You can use Google's Transparency Report for China to determine the current status of Google Services in PRC. Currently, it is difficult to access Gmail, and many other Google services, in mainland China. If Gmail is a critical service ...


30

I arrived at the kit below by adding gear only as needed. I started with just an iPhone and laptop and only added to that when it was literally impossible to get reliable internet at my accommodations with the gear I already had. I have trial-and-errored through a bunch of other gear that turned out to be unhelpful or not worth the bulk (e.g. higher ...


25

Living in China 10+ years I can tell you with confidence that you will not get into trouble for using a VPN. Chinese people themselves also don't get into trouble for using one. (Promoting or sharing a VPN is a different matter obviously.) I wouldn't waste my time finding actual laws, for two reasons: Laws in China are interpreted differently than in the ...


25

It will depend a lot on how many other passengers are using the service, not only in your aircraft, but also in other aircrafts within the same region. Icelandair is not throttling the speed artificially, so you get what is currently technically feasible, but how much that is will depend on many factors. The technically available bandwidth is rather mediocre ...


24

A simple trick to use - especially if browsing the web is very slow, is to change the DNS settings on your laptop for that WiFi connection. I generally use Google's public DNS servers which are 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4. You can also subscribe to a premium DNS service such as smartdns.com which also enables access to services that are geo-blocked in your area. ...


23

You can walk into any large carrier store - AT/T or T-Mobile in your case (since you probably have a GSM phone), and ask for a prepaid SIM card. No address proof, I don't even think they check your ID. T-Mobile usually has the best deals (value for money) and their 3G/4G network is pretty fast. Of course, I am assuming you have an unlocked GSM phone. T-...


21

Below is a screenshot from the flight, flying above Europe: Download: 7.55 Mbps, Upload: 0.47 Mbps, Ping: 688 ms I was even able to make a Telegram call onboard without issues. However... once we've reached the Atlantic the following speeds were observed: Download: 0.26 Mbps, Upload: 0.07 Mbps, Ping: 688 ms Therefore I wouldn't rely on the Internet ...


19

I can only speak for hostelworld.com which I use a lot, the difference there is pretty clear to me: Free WiFi This means Wireless LAN is available in the facility, but not necessarily everywhere. Often it's just in the lobby but not in the/all rooms. The WLAN is connected to the public internet, so if the guest has a device supporting WiFi, she can use it ...


18

One trick is to look up the place on Foursquare - if people have checked in on wifi, it's a sign there's likely free internet, and often if the connection is poor, people comment on that on foursquare as well.


18

Similar to one of your last questions regarding China, asking for concrete non-chinese documentation on Chinese regulations is in most cases not answerable. Why? Chinese officials are not known for transparency, rather the opposite. A lot of things, while visible at the surface through actions like stickers, blocked websites etc are extremely hard to find ...


17

The biggest problem with hotel wi-fi (and conference centre wi-fi) is us. Travelling nerds who need 2 or 3 IP addresses each (and try to do their work each evening while regular people are watching TV) typically bring these systems to their knees. I've had so many hotel people tell me they never get complaints like these the rest of the year, and I actually ...


16

Internet is everywhere in the UK. You can buy a wifi dongle with prepaid sim card in any mobile phone store on any network. The price is reasonable - about £15 for the dongle itself, which include 1 GB of data. Then you just pay for data packs (£7-10 per GB of data depending on the network). Most hotels offer WiFi these days. Most small hotels include ...


16

I can only tell you what I do. First, pick a chain of hotels and stick with them. I always stay at a certain band of hotels and this gives me the ability to know going in that I am less likely to have a problem. When I do have a problem, I have more barging power because I am an established customer. When there is a problem, you have three choices. Use ...


15

Because this question appears as one of the first suggestions on Google, I thought I would give an updated answer as of July 2019. You cannot access any Google services in China without a VPN or a proxy service. The only site that works is www.google.cn which I do not think many foreigners would want to use considering even the domain itself is not ...


14

Yes. DB, the German railway company, offers Wifi hotspot service at selected important stations which allow free surfing for 30 minutes. According to their page (in German; cannot find an English version), over 125 stations (listed there) offer the facilities; among them Munich central and Donnersbergerbrücke, Frankfurt central and Hauptwache and both cities’...


13

I usually end up using Bing if it's something I have to search for in English, even though it's really primitive and low quality in every way compared to Google. If it's something I think I might be able to search in Chinese then I use Baidu. It's best to have a Chinese speaking friend handy though for when I get stuck. You can use Baidu to search in ...


12

Boingo offers "worldwide" Wi-Fi, with fixed fee, per minute, pay-as-you-go, and package deals. Their full plan listing is here. It starts at $7.95/month for unlimited worldwide access for two mobile devices. I've not used the service and am not affiliated, but have them bookmarked for my own travels.


12

@alx9r wrote a fantastically detailed post here, but I think it may be overkill. I'm on the road for most of the year and need to be connected 24/7 for work. For the most part you can get away with: An mini-router (I use an Airport Express). Flakey hotel wifi can be remedied by using a LAN cable to your mobile router, providing a personal wifi spot, ...


12

There is a free Wifi system, which is available at many locations around Singapore called Wireless@SG. To connect to the network you need to be able to receive a SMS to a mobile phone (not necessarily the device you want to access Internet with). This also works with a foreign phone number. There's two networks, an open one (Wireless@SG) and a secured one (...


11

OK after a couple of days of hunting I've found three places where I get a Wi-Fi signal and can buy a coffee or a beer, but only one had a sign and with the others I'm not sure whether the signal is from the place or a coincidental open one nearby... "Bar Kafe Real Madrid" on Rruga Studenti right near Shesi Demokracia, the central traffic circle of the city....


11

It's possible and easy. You just have to go to one of the many mobile shops around and buy the sim card. In Portugal there are 3 physical operators: Meo formerly known as TMN Optimus Vodafone You also have some virtual operators: UZO - they usually have nice prices but everything is done on-line. You can buy a card in mobile phone shops or by snail mail ...


11

German ICEs have some coaches that are considered to be "quiet zones" and some coaches are "talking zone". There are symbols on the walls that tell you what zone you are in. The symbols can be seen here: http://www.bahn.de/p/view/service/zug/handy_u_ruhebereiche.shtml So technically having a telecon is allowed in the "talking zones". For fairness, it is ...


11

From my personal experience (Jun 2016) Yahoo works better than Bing in China, although both indeed work and not blocked as stated by @hippietrail above. Bing also has a nice online translator: http://www.bing.com/translator where you can feed the sites like Baidu. This is also available in China.


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