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Yes. It's not the only option, but the obvious choice is Ormeno's direct connection between Rio / Sao Paulo and Lima. It's a bit of a long ride, at around 4 full days of travel. Here's the Ormeno website. Here's my experience of doing that trip from Lima to Rio. I'm not aware of being able to buy a ticket for this connection online. You'd have to go to one ...


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Yes it is possible. But you are not going to like it. There is a bus connection from Sao Paulo, Brazil to Santiago Chile, going through Paraguay and Argentina, which does not enter Bolivia. Once there you can take a bus from Santiago, Chile to Bogota Columbia, passing through Peru and Equador. Both of these trips take approximately 2.5 days, so you are ...


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Depending on how close your trip to Brazil is, which other documents you have and for the sake of completeness, I see 2 additional options (besides the one on this answer) for you: There's a document called ARB, Autorização de Retorno ao Brasil ("Authorization to Return to Brazil"). In short, ARB it is a document valid for a single trip back to Brazil. Once ...


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To enter Brazil you must present a valid travel document (US passport) and a proof of Brazilian nationality (Brazilian passport even if expired, or any kind of document that proves Brazilian nationality) As recommended in the comments, use your US passport as your main travel document for the airline and present your Brazilian passport for Polícia Federal ...


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CPF is used for tax-related purposes, quoting Wikipedia: CPF is the Brazilian individual taxpayer registry identification, a number attributed by the Brazilian Federal Revenue to both Brazilians and resident aliens who pay taxes or take part, directly or indirectly, in activities that provide revenue for any of the dozens of different types of taxes ...


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Personally I have found that the two best bank ATMs to use are HSBC and Santander. Both accept foreign cards and shouldn't charge you an ATM fee to withdraw. However, the costs that you will pay are related to your own bank in your home country. These fees are usually the cost to convert the funds into reais, as well as a fee for using your card overseas. So ...


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From your post, it's difficult to deduce your underlying use-case, and it appears your issue might be more suited to something like expats.se. That said, you might be served by the ecosystem that's provided through becoming an e-resident of Estonia. That would make it possible for you to open a bank account in Estonia, as well as a few other European ...


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You can extend it, at the discretion of the police. From Brazil Gringo: Requests to extend your tourist visa for an additional 90 days must be made at the local Federal Police office. A complete list of Policia Federal locations is found at the bottom of this post. It’s very important that you extend your stay before the initial 90 allotment ...


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