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Quoting from the U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE - BUREAU of CONSULAR AFFAIRS: U.S. nationals, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. The US doesn't have consistent exit controls, but some users online report of random checks being carried out by Customs. Personally I've never seen any, or know anyone who did, so ...


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Quoting from the U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE - BUREAU of CONSULAR AFFAIRS: U.S. nationals, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Also quoting from the U.S. DEPARTMENT of STATE: U.S. citizens currently overseas whose passports expired on or after January 1, 2020, may be able to use their expired U.S. passport ...


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This should work. You should be able to get into Spain with your Irish passport. You can return to the US with an expired passport if you return before the end of the year. https://www.state.gov/return-travel-on-recently-expired-u-s-passports/ Before you book: I strongly recommend that you contact the airline and verify that they will let you board the ...


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can anyone please tell me or confirm that exiting the US without my US passport won't be an issue? It's not an issue. US has no exit controls. You can enter a third country with any passport you like. I know I need my US passport for reentering the US, Since it's so hard to renew passports, there is a Covid exemption in place: https://www.state.gov/return-...


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The US doesn't have exit controls, so you won't have a problem usually. The regulation doesn't have a penalty to be enforced anyway. You don't need to be worried about the US here, but whether the airline will let you board or not, which depends on if you'll be able to enter your destination. I assume that on an Irish passport, you'll be able to enter visa-...


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Flights are not booked with a passport - but on a name. They cannot be used by someone else (= having a different name). On your outbound leg, you will need to use either the passport that has the matching name, or the US passport together with documentation of the name change. The gate agent will probably also ask you about your return leg, as they are ...


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I almost always check in for flights leaving the US with my non-US passport. I show that passport to everyone, including the TSA (who are only identifying you, not investigating your immigration status). It's never been a problem. I have the sense that some US airlines may pay attention to the immigration status of departing foreigners, but I usually use ...


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Your newborn is a US citizen, and 18 USC §1185 requires US citizens to bear a valid US passport for entry into (and exit from) the US. Airlines know this, and will refuse to board her onto a flight to the US unless she has a valid US passport. That she is a dual citizen of the US and another country is irrelevant. As a US citizen, the airline will apply the ...


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You always check in with the passport that you will use to enter the destination country Always enter and leave a country with the same passport If you switch passports during travel, let the airline know, especially if the country has exit controls. Example "I'm leaving Germany on passport A and will enter Korea on passport B". The US doesn't ...


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Yes, you can most definitely do that (have done that too many times to count). The information you provide to the airline is mostly for the destination country, not the one you are leaving, and since the US do not do any exit checks, there's no-one else to show your US passport. At some point in time check-in personnel would ask questions when you left the ...


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