New answers tagged

1

In addition to other answers, some points that are specific to Nizhny Novgorod (I live in Nizhny myself). Firstly, in many Russian cities the marshrutkas are small minibuses like in alamar's answer (basically, GAZelles). But in Nizhny much more common are PAZ buses. They are larger and allow for standing passangers. Secondly, while in many cities you ...


1

As others have already correctly said, "marshrutka" is a colloquial version of "marshrutnoe taksi", that is, "routed taxi". This concept emerged in late 1930s when Moscow started operating a few ZiS-101 limousines between the city center and VSKhV (later VDNKh/VVTs, now again VDNKh), so that every proletarian could enjoy the luxury of a government limousine ...


1

In my city, we also have private buses - but they are not too different from normal buses, so people would just say "bus". Historically, the main distinction between marshrutkas and public buses was that marshrutkas only accepted cash with a single fare for everyone, while public buses accepted city-issued season tickets and passes and provided discounts ...


1

In the city in Ukraine were I live the маршрутка (marshrutka) are basically just the buses that go around the city. They are privately owned - there are no publicly owned buses (although there are trolly buses) but regulated just like buses. They have a service contract with the city which specifies the routes, prices and how often they should run. There is ...


12

The greatest danger of marshrutkis are lax regulations in terms of safety, driver qualifications and quality of service. Many small private companies will try to save on vehicle repairs and driver salaries, hiring underskilled drivers and forcing them to drive old rickety Gazelle minibuses for 12 hours a day. If such minibus gets into a nasty accident the ...


19

This answer would be incomplete without a picturesque Marshrutka: (courtesy Wikipedia) A typical 13-pax GAZel painted in yellow and with route details.


3

Long distance buses in Argentina are indeed pretty good, in particular those branded "coche-cama", "ejecutivo", etc. Way better than the average European bus, and crazy better than the typical Greyhound in North America. That said, the trip from Buenos Aires to the north of Patagonia will be around 24 hours, and twice that to the south. To boot, prices are ...


45

Just to add to the above guys answers. Маршрутка (Marshrutka) is a slang. It's a shortened version of "Маршрутное такси" (can be roughly translated as "Routed" taxi, essentially a taxi that has a specified route that it always has to take). Usually looks like a minibus/minicab. Therefore can behave like a bus: has a timetable goes through a specific route ...


5

Маршрутка (marshrutka) is like a private minibus, it is privately owned: a way of public transport, private minibus. It is very common in Russia and other neighboring countries.# (Source) Dangerous? They can be dangerous for some reasons: On the bad side, they're crowded and speed excessively, increasing the risk of an accident. From my experience of ...


14

Marshrutka. Dolmuş in Turkey. These are very similar things: something half way between a taxi and a bus. A shared minibus where the route, while exists, is more or less flexible -- the drivers will stop where there is no scheduled stop and sometimes even make small changes to the route even. You typically need to speak the local language so you can tell ...


1

You probably have three options according to Rome2Rio: Drive. 2 hours 18ish, you'd need to rent a car from the airport. Train. 6 hours 20ish. Unfortunately doesn't leave until the morning. Bus. 4 hours 23ish. Also unforrtunately, no services until the next morning. The costs, times and departures vary, Rome2Rio shows you the various options.


0

To visit Kaliningrad, even passing through a land boarder from Poland or Lithuania, you'll need a Visa. That used to be a challenge (Russian visitors visas are a PAIN) but I notice that it is now possible to book an e-Visa for short visits to Kaliningrad. Details here: http://electronic-visa.kdmid.ru/klgd_home_en.html


5

I just completed 3 long Flixbus journeys and this is what I found out: There are stops, but how many probably depends on the route and the time of day. The stops are announced a few minutes before and usually the driver will tell you how many minutes you got - but the drivers dialect might be hard to understand so if you're unsure then ask the driver or a ...


8

Why not just pay the fine and learn your lesson for next time? If you think you're going to be travelling again, is it really worth the risk and the worrying every time you do so? I would guess the fine is not that much, probably less then Euro 50 or so? If you can afford to travel to Italy, you can probably afford to pay the fine. I totally get that it ...


7

Years ago, I took the long distance bus from Washington DC to Niagra Falls. While the majority of the journey was at night, the last few hours were in daylight. To be honest there was little to see or do. There was no commentary from the driver, just brief announcements of the next stop coming up. After all, this was not a tourist bus, but just a cheap ...


4

We travelled on the Flixbus service from Munich to Zagreb departing at 3.15am recently. There were two drivers onboard and we stopped at a service station in Austria after a couple of hours on the road where we stopped for about 15 minutes and were able to get off and stretch our legs and the drivers swapped over. We then stopped in Ljubljana for 20 minutes ...


2

You can pay in cash or card before you exit: When you reach Framingham they will ask you to remain on the bus and let those who prepaid to get off first. You will then pay before exiting. (Source)


2

One reason may be the ticket machine wasn't working, and the driver (either by law, or company policy) cannot receive payment without issuing a ticket (receipt).


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