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17

No, that question is intended to find out if someone has asked you to take something through customs that does not belong to you (and you might not know what it contains). You are bringing a gift, and so the question that applies (from the English version) is Goods (personal, souvenirs, gifts) exceeding duty-free allowance. which is elsewhere ...


56

No, it does not count as an "item requested from someone else" The question is not really clear in English. But if you take a look at the same form in French, question 1.6 is translated as such: Articles qui vous ont été confiés par un tiers. ...which means, unmistakably this time: Items that someone else gave you/entrusted you with This question is ...


2

In general, it's safest to use the same passport for any given country until that passport expires. If it's necessary to switch for any given country, it's best to switch while you're outside that country unless you reside in the country. Someone with multiple nationalities must choose which nationality to use. The choice of nationality may or may not be ...


1

Per TIMATIC, the database used by airlines: Passengers are not allowed to enter Egypt until 31 March 2020. So wait until after tomorrow and I'll have a look at what happens then


1

I'll give a purely practical answer without digging too much into the academics. Your first concern needs to be getting on the flight. For this, airport staff will use the TIMATIC database, which states: Passengers arriving from a non-Schengen Member State are not allowed to enter Germany. This does not apply to passengers with long-term right of ...


0

So my question is, is the Blue Card considered a "long-term resident"? Someone with a blue card is not a "long-term resident[] under the Long-term Residence Directive." However, such a person is a "person[] deriving [a] right to reside from...national law." Therefore, the bearer of a valid German blue card should be permitted to return to a home in ...


-2

Yes, the Blue Card is one form of a residence permit. Long is anything that is at least 3 months. Within Germany, returning to your place of residence is considered a valid travel reason. Assuming you have your card with you, you should have no problems with either the Airline or Border guards. Personen, die nicht die deutsche Staatsangehörigkeit ...


11

The Deutschlandfunk news today talked about the recovery flights and mentioned that smaller Pacific islands were difficult, so they were going to stage the recovery through New Zealand. At a wild guess, the flight(s) would carry Germans stuck in NZ, too.


2

As a semi pro poker player I travel in and out of the US with cash over 10k frequently over the years, I have never had any issues when declaring the cash. I have had my papers in order of course where is the money from etc, where in Vegas or AC will I be staying and for how long. If leaving the US then receipts etc from casinos and so on. As long as your ...


34

Have they looked at the German Embassy site for New Zealand? The first link of that page leads to the Covid-19: Informationen für Reisende page that gives details about the present situation. Have they registred in the ELEFAND as well at the www.rueckholprogramm.de? the latter is needed so that the Embassy knows who needs help Hierfür gilt ...


28

For your proposed routing, Timatic currently says: Transit - Australia (AU) Passengers are not allowed to transit or enter Australia. Passengers departing from New Zealand with a confirmed onward ticket on the same calendar day to return home are allowed to transit through Australia. They must remain airside and must have not been in China (...


4

I will take the liberty to write a general answer of the entire EU and for any length of stay, as I think it might be useful for other people with this question: Stays under 3 months Some EU countries require you to report your presence to the relevant authorities (often the town hall or local police station) within a reasonable period of time after ...


5

In Germany, all residents have to register their place of residence with the municipal authorities. A special rule applies to hotels and hostels. Tourists with extremely long stays might come under this regulation, but not for less than a week.


6

No, foreigners staying temporarily in Germany are not required to report or register their whereabouts. Had you stayed in a hotel or another kind of commercially operated lodging, the accomodation would have been required to collect and keep records of your personal data, but these records are also only handed out to the authorities on request and not by ...


14

It really depends. Airline checkin agents are overcautious as in remote case of you being denied, Airline have to pay the fine. From talking to a checkin agent, if the fault is the agent's, the fine will be coming from their paycheck (may vary with airlines). You have three options. Get a new passport or one time travel document from your embassy (...


4

The most common stamp for visa-free visitors is code 5n, issued when a stay of up to 6 months (the maximum) is granted and there are no particular suspicions about the entrant. The former landing cards would then be discarded. Then there's code 3, issued when, for example, there are suspicions about the entrant (insufficient to refuse entry), when a visa ...


16

I posted the question and have since heard from the Japanese Immigration Bureau: the answer is no, if you've been convicted of a felony you cannot land in Japan or transit through it.


11

For immigration purposes,Border Force Officers do not tape or video record interviews at the desk or in their interview rooms. The interviews are supposed to be hand-written verbatim (both questions and answers). If an interpreter is used (speaker phone) the notes will be in English. CCTV in ports/airports in the UK are the port/airport operator's property ...


13

There is no evidence to suggest that immigration interviews are recorded. If people were being recorded it would be on the privacy notice: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/779876/borders-immigration-citizenship-system-privacy-notice.pdf


1

Unless it's written on your laptop cover, in big bold letters, that it is a work laptop, it's just a laptop. You are free to take it with you, and unless you are planning to sell it while in the US, no paperwork is required. If you're asked at the border, of which chances are negligible, why you are carrying it with you, truthfully say that you will be ...


2

If a national of the country with no other citizenship, no for countries which are signatories to the treaties to avoid statelessness (this does not include the US). If the person has multiple nationalities, they could revoke their citizenship. This is usually only permissible for acquired nationalities rather than those you get by birth, but this is country-...


3

Yes in some cases. From https://www.aclunc.org/our-work/know-your-rights/know-your-rights-us-airports-and-ports-entry Lawful permanent residents cannot be refused entry unless their travel was not brief (more than 180 days) or they engaged in illegal activity after leaving the United States as defined in 8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(13)


2

No. See this answer on Politics Stack Exchange: Internationally speaking, there are actually no countries using the exile or banishment in their current legislation because this is regulated by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, so (to repeat) there's no country (so far) using exile in their laws.


2

East Germany used to deny entry to some of their citizens over the years. can legally? They were their own legislation. Who would force a country to let their own citizens in?


4

Yes, you can travel to Australia with a Polish temporary passport. Timatic, the database which airlines use to verify passenger travel documents, states in relevant part: Passport Exemptions: Nationals of Poland with a temporary passport. Remember to transfer your visa to your new passport before you travel. Since you must do this anyway, you ...


2

This is not really answerable as asked: it all depends on what exactly do you define as "visa free" and what exactly you define as "country" and what you want to do with the information. The ctizienship that allows you the most "visa free" access is Japan with 191. See https://www.henleypassportindex.com/passport . We can find a more detailed break down ...


4

As a Canadian citizen then you don't need a visa to enter the UK as a visitor. As you are just entering for a period of 1 week, have no intention to stay longer, then this should not represent a problem for you so long that you are able to; Prove that you have onward travel arrangements out of the UK (printout of your flight confirmation) Have sufficient ...


2

As you have booked connecting flights (they're on the same ticket/booking), given your itineraries, you will be checked through to your destination: At the point of departure, your bags will be tagged with the final destination. You will not see them again until you reach it. You will probably be issued boarding passes for both flights. In some cases, they ...


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