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25

The immigration rules state: Previous breach of immigration laws grounds 9.8.1. An application for entry clearance or permission to enter must be refused if: (a) the applicant has previously breached immigration laws; and (b) the application is for entry clearance or permission to enter and it was made within the relevant time period in paragraph 9.8.7. (...


1

US law and other materials routinely refer to "passports", but that term is defined to include other passport-like documents that do not bear the title "passport." The definition is at 8 USC 1101(a)(30): The term “passport” means any travel document issued by competent authority showing the bearer’s origin, identity, and nationality if ...


2

It depends. I don't know the specifics of the country you were denied entry to, but for the US, if you are denied entry at a port of entry in the US (all US ports of entry are in the US except for preclearance at certain Canadian and foreign airports), the officer has the choice of allowing you with voluntarily depart or to remove you. If the officer allows ...


2

Deportation means the removal of someone already having entered the country. If you're removed from port, it's just that, a removal.


11

Yes you will need a visa, specifically the Visitor in Transit visa, but you may have a chance at transit-without-visa (as you fit some of the criteria there) although I wouldnt recommend just chancing it. Being that your flight leaves the next day, you cannot stay in Heathrow terminals overnight as they close to passengers and there are no airside hotels at ...


46

Do you think having no exit record from the UK on my passport will risk my visa application for re entering? No. The UK does not place exit records in passports. Nobody has such a record, and not having such a record couldn't possibly have a negative impact on your visa application. As noted in the other answer, the UK does record certain departures ...


19

The UK (and the US), unlike most other countries, don't stamp passports on exit. Instead the airlines send an electronic record of your departure, and this is added to the Home Office's records on your passport. When you apply for a UK Visa, this record will be checked, and since you have a matching entry and exit electronic records, the lack of a stamp won'...


3

Note: this is specific to Austria the information contained in the Federal Chancellery of Austria site, seems to have been updated after the 24th of December 2020 For British Citizens, an Article 50 EUV card can be applied for during the year 2021 (January to December). Minimal prerequirement is a confirmation of registration (Anmeldebescheinigung, "...


2

There are two different issues here: Not breaking the law. An UK/Polish dual citizen can stay in the EU without time limit. (There are rules how other EU states can deny entry, but they have nothing to do with overstaying. Threats to public order or public health, for example.) Not giving the appearance of having broken the law. An UK/Polish dual citizen ...


4

Although being stuck isn't your fault, it seems that no entity (airline or government) has the responsibility to solve your problem, so you'll have to do it yourself. Apart from going back to Australia, one alternative option is to travel to a 3rd country which allows Australians to enter (perhaps UAE) and apply for a Philippines visa there (if you qualify, ...


4

Are CBP officers rejecting ESTAs during time of COVID? Apparently, if you attempt to fly to the United States from or through a country that is subject to the COVID travel restrictions, the system will automatically cancel the ESTA and indicate to the airline that you may not board the airplane. In that case you will never encounter a CBP official.


10

No, if you are a Polish citizen, you can stay in Poland for as long as you want. Having ever been or lived there before, other citizenships, where you reside now, the purpose of your trip, your financial situation, even actually holding the passport (the document) do not change that.


2

Your ESTA is valid for two years, for multiple travels, and neither the date nor the location you used when applying are of relevance. Aside from potential COVID restrictions (which I don't know), you can fly with it to any place in the US, at any time (within the two years).


18

The traveller owns the responsibility for ensuring they have all relevant valid travel documents or ability to transit or enter into countries, either their destination or any transit stop along the way. Airlines have no liability to the passenger for ensuring their documents are valid, or whether they actually have the ability to enter the destination ...


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