New answers tagged

1

I'll contradict Mark's answer and say: you're all good! As you point out, Slovakia cares about where you're arriving from there and then, and with Croatia being an "allowed" country, you're free to enter Slovakia if flying from there. Other countries may instead care about where you've been in the past 14 days and/or where you're a citizen or ...


6

I guess you said it in your question -- people traveling on their US passports would need the ETIAS authorization beforehand to enter Europe. Traveling on their EU passport would presumably save that step (along with any associated fees).


3

When arriving from the UK, there are no restrictions on entry to France. Passport control is done at the St Pancras station in London, but you won't be refused entry on COVID-19 related grounds unless exhibiting symptoms yourself. You do, however, need to fill out and print the second page of this form (LINK)


8

Eurostar is running and definitely open without restrictions to British residents. The UK is outside the Schengen area and the French border police checks passports in London before boarding the train so you cannot hope to fly under the radar and you could very easily be denied entry. The most important question is whether having spent a mandatory quarantine ...


-1

Doubtful. Below is the full text that probably reflects the IATA statement. You will see that there is a bit more to it than just making a booking. Assume that the Schengen Border Control will be looking for proof that you have been in a risk free area for at least 14 days. Then they will be looking for proof that you are a resident of one of the exempted ...


4

You don’t really need a passport for a booking, and even if you add one, it doesn’t matter. There can be significant time between booking and flying and documents and requirements can change. You need to present a passport at check in that needs to be valid for your current travel. Which one you present is up to you and United doesn’t care as long as it’s ...


2

Yes, as a US citizen you are allowed to travel to the US, as can be found in other current answers on this topic. As a (presumably) UK resident you are also allowed back into the UK, but have to observe a 14 day period of self isolation. See https://www.gov.uk/uk-border-control for details. For travel to the rest of Europe, you can use the Re-open EU page ...


8

From https://www.sinosecu.com.cn/en/news/view/20.html (mirror): The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is responsible for setting up standards for Machine Readable Travel Documents (MRTD). MRTD makes it easy for automated travel documents checking. It’s much faster and less tends to make mistakes than manual input. MRTD have a Machine Readable ...


18

The best thing to do is contact the Japanese consulate and ask if you fullfill the conditions of any long term visa. A quick search, however, reveals one that may suit your purpose: Designated activities (Long Stay for sightseeing and recreation) 6 months, renewable up to 12 months The linked page describes the further financial and health insurance ...


9

Your question seems to depend on the common assumption that airline bookings are bound to a specific passport. That assumption is entirely incorrect. One man even took a woman on a round-the-world trip simply because she had the same name as his ex-girlfriend. I routinely use different passports for different flights on the same booking (a US passport and ...


28

Typically, yes. The airline doesn't really care what nationality you are or which passport you use, all they need to know is that you will be accepted at the destination country, and they'll accept whatever documentation you have for this. The one major caveat to this is countries that insist on passenger info being registered well in advance, notably the US....


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