264

You are paying for the drink and a deposit for the bottle. The deposit should be listed on the shelves, but usually in small print. Look for something like "zzgl. 0,15 Pfand". As to your initial thought, prices on supermarket shelves include VAT. There are deposits on many but not all drink containers, the rules are complicated. Deposits apply to non-...


154

Except for upper class restaurants serving only fixed multi-course menus, I have never (neither in France nor anywhere else) experienced a restaurant, where you could not order only a part of what is considered a complete meal. It might be an unusual request, but I would simply go into any restaurant you like and order a crème brûlée and a nice glass of ...


101

From the media release on guestlogix.com: The airline onboard retail industry has been growing annually at an average rate of 12.9% since 2012, and totaled more than $5 billion in sales in 2014... Basically, it works, and makes the airlines more money. If it didn't, the airlines wouldn't do it (sidenote: Qantas is going to stop doing it this month). ...


90

You're overthinking it. We're french, weird but not that much. Just walk in any restaurant, order anything you'd like, would it be just appetizers or a dessert, pay your bill and walk out. I would be happy to show you how it's done. :) Enjoy your crème brulée (it's not that great though) !


62

In my eyes 7/7 is shorthand for French 7 jours sur 7 which translates to 7 days out of 7. Meaning the business is open all week. Note that this does not necessarily mean that the business is also open 24h. Indeed in France you often read 7j/7 written on shops that are open every day of the week (note the little j, standing for jours == days). For example, ...


51

Look for the word "Kohlensäure", it's either on the front or in the list of ingredients: Just make sure it's not accompanied by "ohne" ("without"):


49

It's a law that's designed to reduce public drunkenness / alcoholism, especially at night when you don't want loud, rowdy and sometimes violent drunk people in the streets. Sometimes vendors try to circumvent these laws by selling e.g. a very expensive plastic cup that comes with a free can of beer when you buy it : ), but there have been crackdowns on such ...


45

For busy executives (and other travellers) who would like to bring back a gift or present, this is heaven-sent. Also, some airlines offer exclusive items you simply cannot buy anywhere else. And it's more popular than you might think. On a recent British Airways flight out of London, my wife was disappointed when she could not purchase a certain kind of ...


44

First, carbonated is the standard in Germany, and that's what most people expect, so it would be the default assumption for something you see in the shelves. Of course, it is written on the drink, but you need to be able to understand enough German to read it. 'Still' is the typical term used in German for non-carbonated water-realted; if you see that, it ...


43

Because you only gain 11.7% volume and give up a bunch of other advantages, including making packing worse. The volume of luggage with maximum checked-luggage dimensions (W + L + H <= 62)[1] is 27in x 21in x 14in = 7938in3. The volume of the cube is (20.7in)3 = 8869.7in3. Only 11.7% more. If maximizing (packing) volume (inside a large regular space) was ...


43

A little bit of history: (from the top of my head, there is very little to find about this on the web I think, even in Spanish): At some point during the Cuban Revolution and before I was born, being in possesion of any foreing currencies in Cuba became illegal (unless you had a special permit from the government). Many Cubans spent time in jail for this ...


43

Prices in supermarkets in Germany always already include VAT. What you've been paying extra is called "Pfand": basically a deposit for the bottle, which can be reused or recycled. You can return the empty bottle in the supermarket to get that money back.


43

France has something called "Le Goûter", which is their version of Afternoon tea. The French generally eat late in the evening, after 8 PM, so there is a habit of having something sweet in the afternoon to tide you over between lunch and dinner. This is a fully socially acceptable part of their diet and is viewed not as a snack but as a meal in the own right,...


41

Unfortunately, there is no official service to help you out. You're supposed to ask someone to buy stuff for you and bring it over. The Ministry assumes that everyone knows someone who is able to help. If you don't know anyone, you have to search for alternatives. If you stay in Berlin, you should be able to find a supermarket that will deliver groceries ...


40

Even though the people who walk past are unlikely to be want to buy a suitcase right now, they are still the target demographic. How many other locations are there in a city where you can open a store where 100% of the people that walk past are people that travel by air, and thus the type of people that will be in the market for your products? How many non-...


36

If you select the local currency, it will be converted to your card's currency according to the terms of your cardholder agreement (e.g. in the US and Canada it's often Visa/Mastercard's current rate + 2.5%, or possibly less for some fancy cards with annual fees). Some cards may add a per-transaction fixed fee on top of that. If you select your card's ...


35

The French seem to go for very small and massive stores. There are some mid-size stores but these seem rather rare. In fact, the French are known around the world for exporting their retail chains and hypermarché [hypermarket] concept. These are most similar to American super centers, but genearlly have a focus on food and are between the size of an American ...


32

Being Dutch, I have never heard of such law. I also doubt there is a law that would cover this, I would take it as a try to intimidate you. But also as a 'please really, really do not do this.' If caught out after you made the picture and before you had seen the sign, I would let them try to sue you. But if seeing the sign before you take the picture, do ...


31

As you've mentioned in your question, online searches work best when you know the name of the store you're looking for, or what kind of store is likely to carry your item. I recommend instead you talk to a person. If you're staying at or near a hotel, hotel staff are your first choice. The front desk, for example. These people probably live nearby, or are ...


30

There is no general VAT in the US but various sales taxes, which means that there isn't a single tax rate that shops could easily include in all prices. Depending on the location, there could be a sales tax from the state, county, city or even other institutions (transport authorities, etc.) so you cannot even set a price and print labels for a state or a ...


26

As other answers have pointed out, the mere fact that airlines still do it proves that it earns them money. But why would it make money even if most people don’t buy? You have very good conditions inside an aeroplane for perfect marketing leaving the customer at a severe disadvantage. I’ll admit that they are getting worse, especially if more airlines and ...


25

Rules regarding alcohol production, sales and consumption are governed by Federal law N 171-ФЗ. Chapter II article 16 paragraph 5 says: Не допускается розничная продажа алкогольной продукции с 23 часов до 8 часов по местному времени, за исключением розничной продажи алкогольной продукции, осуществляемой организациями [...] услуг общественного питания, ...


24

It depends on the item. Alcoholic spirits (whiskey etc) and tobacco are the usual items to get, since they typically are the most heavily taxed items, so can be considerably cheaper at Duty Free than in either country. Usually you'll be able to get all of the major name-brand items, and sometimes some regional items (eg. Jenevers - Dutch gins - if in ...


24

Here's a picture of the logo which is printed on recyclable bottles/cans which carry a deposit (typically €0.25): Considering the amount you paid (€0.15), the juice you bought was in a refillable bottle of 0.5L or more. If you don't want to be charged the deposit when you purchase your drink, look for single-use bottles/cans (i.e. PET bottles, aluminum ...


23

The service you are referring to is called "dynamic currency conversion" and is sold as an extra convenience in locales with a heavy tourist presence, not just in airports. Many people are tempted to opt for their home currency because they assume that it will relieve them of inter-bank fees and disadvantageous exchange rates. Starting with your second ...


23

Yes, you can buy prepackaged food in convenience stores throughout India and there are many. Even in small shops you can buy prepackaged food like cakes, or ready to eat stuff etc. which you can heat up in your room. But prepackaged food in India does not mean that you will not get sick. If you want to avoid getting sick in India you have to do: Don’t ...


22

Short answer - no, not any more. (It used to be possible pre-9/11, but isn't allowed now) To change between terminals airside at Heathrow, you need to go through Flight Connections. After the bit where they can issue boarding passes if you don't have one, is the part where they check your boarding pass. No boarding pass for a different terminal, no access ...


22

Setting aside the people who suddenly need more or different suitcases, an airport is one of the few places where you feel dissatisfied with the suitcases you have. While they're sitting in your closet, they're fine. You've used them for years and they work. But for the hour or two after you've packed them, lugged them from the car into the airport, and ...


22

Real estate in Paris is too expensive for really large supermarkets, you need to get outside the dense part of the city (which - for Paris - is quite some way out). You wouldn't expect a quarter-square-mile-supermarket in Manhattan, would you? Generally, there are large supermarkets in France; less than in the US, but sufficient. Just remember to check the ...


21

Many grocery delivery services exist that will allow you to order online and have them delivered to your door. Here's an article: Groceries Delivery Services in Berlin It lists two delivery services and compares them REWE Delivery Service Bringmeister EDIT: Originally this answer included a disclaimer that delivery times may be long, but it seems to have ...


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