51

Look for the word "Kohlensäure", it's either on the front or in the list of ingredients: Just make sure it's not accompanied by "ohne" ("without"):


44

First, carbonated is the standard in Germany, and that's what most people expect, so it would be the default assumption for something you see in the shelves. Of course, it is written on the drink, but you need to be able to understand enough German to read it. 'Still' is the typical term used in German for non-carbonated water-realted; if you see that, it ...


39

Not very severe. In Munich as with most of Germany, automated transport ticket machines can be changed easily to a number of different languages. Physical German signs are mostly in German but their alphabet is very similar to English so can be easily memorised when you need to know certain place names. However, Munich is a very walkable city which I would ...


18

In addition to points already mentioned, there is another indicator for plastic bottles: Try to press and see how easily you are able to dent them. The air in bottles of carbonated drinks is under pressure. When you compare different plastic bottles of the same form factor, you will notice that you can tell by pressing them: rather compressible: non ...


17

You'll be fine. Especially young people or people in tourism-related jobs speak good English. Public transport is well-organized and easy to navigate. It might help you to plan your trips and tickets ahead of time (i.e. where you are changing subway lines and what ticket you need - they have a rather complicated zones system so you might just want to get a ...


12

You asked for German sentences. In case you are not confident in your German pronunciation I would rather go for few but well practised phrases than many sentences: Your most important sentence next to "Hallo" and "danke" should be "Sprechen Sie Englisch?" As others already have said, a lot of people speak good English in Germany - especially in large ...


10

There is absolutely no way that I know (native German) to tell without reading the label. Bottles, colors of caps or whatever, I have never noticed any pattern that discerns carbonated from not carbonated drinks. non-exhaustive list of indicators that you have a carbonated drink: mit Kohlensäure (anything) Schorle (1) prickelnd / gespritzt (Austria, maybe ...


7

The name of the drink often shows if it is carbonated. The drink on the image is named "Apfelschorle". "Schorle" is carbonated juice. "Apfelsaft" on the other hand is natural apple juice (juice is "Saft" in German) without carbon dioxid. For water Aganju said the important thing: Normally bottled water is carbonated in Germany. If not it is usually labeled ...


5

Typically, cruise ships get a special treatment in the sense that you are never considered to have 'entered' the destination countries. That takes care of any potential issues in Cozumel, Grand Cayman, etc. You need to have a valid passport to get on board of the cruise ship, and then you are allowed to go on land temporarily with the cruise ship boarding ...


5

My experience in Munich included many conversations like this: Me: "Ja, ein großes weißwurst und ein schwarzes Bier, bitte." Wurstmeister: "Would you like mustard and relish on your sausage?" My German friends (all of whom speak better English than some of my Canadian friends) are of the opinion that if the person has tried to learn even a little bit of ...


3

Just a word of warning: if you really cannot abide carbon dioxide, "Still" is not even a guarantee for mineral water to be without carbon dioxide addition. It's just less than in "Medium". Turn the bottle on its head and look for bubbles. "Naturell" or similar are safer in that respect. Heavy glass in the "standard" deposit 0.75l bottle form is usually ...


3

Germans are very common in Italy during the summer. Garda Lake and more in general beaches from north to south are filled with them. Italy for germans is: near cheaper hotter than their home country ;)


2

"Sprudel" or "sprudelnd" are the German words for "fizz" and "fizzy" respectively, so these too are worth watching out for (as well as the "Kohlensaeure" already mentioned).


2

The keyword to search for is beglaubigte übersetzung (add either your city or online to the query). You will find heaps of certified translators. Even those not operating completely online are usually able to receive your documents via mail and provide you a scan of their translation quickly. This is not necessarily cheap, a few years ago I paid 130€ for ...


1

I'll give a purely practical answer without digging too much into the academics. Your first concern needs to be getting on the flight. For this, airport staff will use the TIMATIC database, which states: Passengers arriving from a non-Schengen Member State are not allowed to enter Germany. This does not apply to passengers with long-term right of residence (...


1

The official guidance from UK Visas and Immigration for Standard Visitor Visas states: If you submit a document that is not in English or Welsh, it must be accompanied by a full translation that can be independently verified by the Home Office. Each translated document must contain: confirmation from the translator that it is an accurate translation of ...


1

Frankfurt is massively cosmopolitan and its taxi services are generally ready to work with you in English. This would hold true for locales extending north to the Taunus. Generally you would only need to carry one or two numbers anyway. You mentioned Seligenstadt and Obertshausen, the former being further out and not a sure bet unless you plan ahead. ...


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