The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
86

Do not assume your money is lost, contact your payment card issuer at once. Regardless of debit vs credit, you should always contact the bank and let them tell you if it is possible to get your money back through them. They're in a better position to know because there are a lot of specific details and local regulations. My answer from this point on is ...


67

Called AirBerlin. They're saying that at the moment they are expecting all flights within the next 3 months to operate normally and that I should check back in one week to get an update about possible refunds and cancellation policies.


50

Uh, this is exactly the sort of thing travel insurance is sold for - you have an uncertainty that you want covered, and you don't want to be massively out of pocket if that uncertainty becomes reality. Go and talk to an insurance broker and have them advise you (on what policy to buy) in writing - that way, you should be covered for both the Ryanair ...


43

You can advertise for someone with the same name as your companion to come on the trip with you, like this person did: A Toronto man looking for a travel partner with the same name as his ex-girlfriend has finally found his match. After making headlines a month ago by offering a free plane ticket around the world to someone named “Elizabeth Gallagher,” ...


42

If you thought the cancellation fee was too high, why did you agree to it? The hotel may well be entitled to take action to recover the debt you owe it; that would depend on the detail of the local law and the conditions of the contract you have. If you are interested in that, please do go over to law.stackexchange.com for a fuller discussion. Whether the ...


41

Even if the fare rule doesn't allow refunds in principle, the airline may decide to give you one anyway, especially if you cancel long in advance so they have ample time to sell the seat to someone else. Although it's only one data point, it happened to me with Lufthansa a couple years ago, but since it's the only time I have had to cancel a ticket, I can't ...


41

TL;DR: Your ticket is still valid and you can take any connection to your destination (and it is not relevant if you booked a SuperSparpreis, Sparpreis or Flexpreis ticket) if your train/connection is expected to be delayed by at least 20 minutes at your destination or is cancelled at all. For more information have a look at Overview of the main passengers' ...


39

The conditions of carriage for your ticket do not include a provision for a refund in this case. Though there is a provision (3.2.1.3) to extend the validity of your tickets if you can't travel due to illness, but it only applies if you get sick once your trip starts. However, many airlines will make accommodations in such situations as a customer service ...


37

Just to address specifically where to find out the cancellation fee for Bookings.com When selecting the specific room, Bookings.com has an entire column dedicated to conditions. Sometimes there is free cancellation offered up to a specific date (usual some X days before the booking starts) Sometimes the hotel will offer some rooms with free cancellation, ...


37

Nothing happens. Your friends fly, you forfeit your ticket.


34

Yes. It is usually required that you fly all legs of a single ticket. Even if you skip the last leg, the airline might penalise you later. At the very least, you should contact the airline before the flight and tell them that for unforeseen reasons you need to skip one leg; in this case, they might not cancel the remainder. Of course, in every particular ...


34

In general: usually the ferries are very reliable, but cancellations do sometimes happen. I've only once had to deal with a cancellation in the last couple of years of holidaying around the islands, and that was warned a couple of days in advance. CalMac, who run the majority of ferry services, report >97% of services run as predicted, with ~2% cancellation ...


32

The booking.com terms and conditions state, in part: Obvious errors and mistakes (including misprints) are not binding. All special offers and promotions are marked as such. If they are not labeled as such, you cannot derive any rights in the event of obvious errors or mistakes. You didn't say what the price was that you paid or whether it was ...


31

Unfortunately, I would not give a dime on anything which a call center agent tells you now or in a week from now. On the other hand, legally, you don't have too many options unless you did not just purchase a ticket from their website but it would be part of a packaged holiday. In case of packaged holidays there is a mandatory insurance against bankruptcy at ...


30

Yes. In my experience while you can't get a refund, you can get a credit. If the airline won't give you a credit, you can give yourself one like this: determine the change fee for your flight. In this example I'll use $150. remind yourself of the price you paid for your flight. I'll use $1000. find a flight a long way in the future that costs just under the ...


29

I had a pair of non-refundable tickets I thought I was going to lose money on because my trip got cancelled; however, as a few people have mentioned...CALL THE AIRLINE! Technically, they did not refund the money for my tickets, but they gave me a credit to use within one year. While that might not seem like a good deal, it really was. My plans changed ...


28

There's a simple third option -- don't change your booking. You've booked it for a month, so it's yours for a month, it's not the host's problem if you leave before the full month is up.


27

If you bought the ticket using a debit/credit card, the easiest way of solving the situation is to file a chargeback with your bank, stating that you did not receive the product you've paid for and haven't received any compensation. It should be easy to prove the flight was cancelled and BoraJet won't be able to prove they've arranged alternative flights, so ...


27

You may lose your money, or some of it, if the company goes bankrupt, which seems likely. According to the Guardian, the airline has suggested that credit card customers check with their card issuers to see if a refund is possible, and that package holiday customers may be protected by the package holiday directive. (Neither of these seems to apply to you ...


26

What matters here is your last statement - the fact you're booking it as a single ticket. When you book a single ticket - regardless of how many airlines you are flying - your ticket is issued by a single airline. In this case that would probably be LAN Chile (as they are the first airline you fly), although it's also possible that it would be Air Canada (...


26

See https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/passenger-rights/air/index_en.htm for an overview of the EU air passenger rights. Layovers, by themselves, do not matter. But if the rerouting you're offered would have you arrive at your final destination later than the original flight, or need to depart from your origin earlier, then you could be entitled ...


23

I don't quite understand why you're "shocked" at the cancellation fee or why you find it "outrageous"? When you reserve a hotel, you make a promise to show up, and the hotel promises to give you a rate that's cheaper than usual. If you cancel, the hotel gets no money from you and is left scrambling to fill that room, which is why cancellation fees are used ...


23

From the way you described it, it looks like you agreed to a contract with specific terms, which include cancellation penalty. Unless the contract stated the penalty would only apply once you made your first payment, then you owe the cancellation fees, and thus yes, you are responsible to pay it. Paying them would of course be your first option. Your ...


23

Ryanair is obligated to give you the EU flight compensation and they will. Beyond that, do you want a rant on getting what you paid for? Edit: apparently cancellation rights include re-routing to their final destination at the earliest opportunity or re-routing at the convenience of the passenger to the final destination subject to availability of seats. ...


20

The only question is: Was the fee listed in the booking.com reservation? This is always included in the booking confirmation you receive by mail. Please check it there. If the fee is there, then you are obliged to pay it. You can of course refuse, but I don't think that this is a good idea. It's clearly non-ethical and it can lead into troubles. If the fee ...


20

As far as the seat is concerned - the airline will take care of that problem for you - in that the seat won't be empty for long. It will probably be assigned to some standby passenger, especially if you are flying a busy route. In most cases, airlines (for a fee that varies) will allow you to change the name on the ticket if it has not been used. You can ...


20

Etihad could possibly help you rebook your ticket on a new flight, but if you want a refund, you need to first contact the ticket seller.


18

Oh yes, you have a right to compensation. EU law EC 261/2004 requires not only either the full ticket price or another fly to the same destination, but costs for lodging and a compensation of 200 - 600 € depending on the length of the flight (200 for < 1500 km, 400 for < 3000 km else 600). The first thing you need to know: As from now you need to get ...


18

What can I do? In addition to the answer by @luchador, keep contacting the airline, asking about the status of your complaint. In some countries you just send a complaint/request one time and then wait to be contacted again. That is not how it works in all countries. In many countries (including the one I live in) you often have to fight to get a proper ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible