Hot answers tagged

105

I've lived in New York City for most of my life, and I've never whistled for a taxi. I have, however, hailed many taxis by silently raising my arm or indeed just making eye contact without any additional gesture. There have been one or two occasions when I've yelled "taxi," but only when the vehicle was on the other side of a wide avenue and the driver's ...


84

Use an app. Virtually everywhere these days has either Uber/ Lyft/ Grab/ Gojek/ Ola/ Didi/ Yandex/ Careem /local clone ride-sharing service, or an app put out by local taxi companies in an attempt to compete. In Istanbul, at time of writing Uber is in a weird not-quite-legal-or-illegal state, but BiTaksi seems to be the app of choice: http://www.bitaksi.com/...


59

It happens that I am a native of Shenzhen, and indeed we avoid those "illicit vehicles" (or "black cabs", hei che 黑车 in Chinese) at all costs. The perceived risk is that they might demand exorbitant fees from you when you eventually arrive, or are half-way. Only God knows what will happen if you refuse to pay them anyway. It might be keeping you inside the ...


58

Grew up in New York City, and the only people who whistle for taxis that I have seen are doormen—and they do it with an actual whistle. Even then, I suspect they are only doing it for effect or maybe tradition. The only places where doormen go and hail a cab for people are really upscale places. A doorman alone is a perk people pay for in New York, and most ...


52

Simply because the fuel cost is only a very small part of the total cab fee and at least until recently, when taxis had mechanically coupled taxameters, it would probably have been much more expensive taking fuel consumption into account than what anyone could have gained by doing so. The major part of the cab fee, perhaps as much as 80-90%, covers the ...


47

London cabs will usually have additional seats in the back which fold up when not in use. This allows up to 5 people to ride in the back. Like below:


45

To avoid any trouble with taxis, you can use the Aeroexpress train. It will get you to the city centre for ~8$ (500 RUB). You can use wireless payment options at the automatic gates: PayPass, PayWave, etc. It departs every half an hour for most of the day. The other two Moscow airports also have an Aeroexpress, with the exception of ZIA. If you plan to use ...


44

Everywhere I go, all over the world, the first thing I say when I get in a taxi is "credit card ok?" and sometimes "I have no local currency." [I once accidentally said this in my own country because it's my "set sentence" and it just came out.] This is even before I say where I'm going. Sometimes they say no, it's not ok, and I get right back out and get in ...


44

Had something similar happen going from Tunis airport to central Tunis. The driver (who had a "mate" with him, so I was skeptical from the outset) had the meter on, but just before the destination he turned it off (at which point it had reached 5 dinars). I only had a 20 note to spare and he wanted to give zero change. He eventually gave 3 dinars back (LOL!) ...


43

Thanks @Doc for the useful link at Japan Times. The main reason taxi drivers prefer fender mirrors is that they provide better visibility,” Osuga explained. “There is less of a blind spot so it’s easier to confirm what is happening at the rear and side of the car, especially on the driver’s side.” Another advantage of fender mirrors compared to door ...


41

According to TripAdvisor, in taxis, "both Thais and local ex-pats commonly round up the fare (i.e. 51 baht fare rounded up to 60 baht)." As ฿7 is equivalent to US$0.22, I wouldn't worry about it much.


40

His name is Ihsan Aknur, and maybe he'll be your friend, too, if you message him on Facebook.


36

No it is not rude. I've lived in London most of my life and travelled in hundreds of black cabs and can assure you that cabbies really do not care what you get up to in the back of the cab -- as long as you pay the fare, give them a decent tip and don't spill food/drink/bodily fluid.


35

Technically, it's up to the uber driver to rate you however she/he sees fit. So it could be because you were super nice, or because you slammed the door, or made a mess, or because it's Tuesday and he feels like being a jerk. Same with the passenger rating the driver, it's up to you to decide what they're worth. If you're polite about it, saying you ...


35

Remain calm and say you have left your wallet in the other bag, which is in the trunk. He will of course know that's a lie, but he will also realize nobody will proceed until the baggage is offloaded first. Prepare to wait several minutes if he is really stubborn. Eventually the taxi will attract the attention of security personnel or his colleagues by ...


34

The City of Boston's Hackney Carriage Rules [PDF], section 5.II.y: Passenger’s Right to Direct Route: Hackney Carriage Drivers shall take such route to the destination as the passenger shall so direct. So you are absolutely allowed to declare your own route, and the driver must follow it. The Rules explain what recourse you have if they refuse. NYC ...


34

I've been in a similar situation many times when travelling during business hours to/from meetings - or, often, when going to the airport - where I've had to jump in on conference calls where I knew it would be for the duration of the ride. I usually excuse myself before the call, letting them know that I'm going to be on a call (even if I'm not talking). ...


30

This is actually based on my mother's experience, and not my own. Yes, this is a common scam. Despite some answers wanting to be generous and say it's possibly accidental, much of the time it is not. If I remember correctly, she told me the way she got around it was by telling the drivers exactly what route she wanted them to take. Even then they would try ...


28

First of all, ignore the people that run up to you when you get out of arrivals. They can see you are not a local and will charge you 4 times the price. Never pay more than 1250 ₽ for a taxi to the Red Square. You can order a taxi from the Yandex taxi stand (Uber equivalent), located in each terminal at the arrivals section. This is open 24/7. They may ask ...


27

I'm a Londoner with kids of a similar age. Info you might find useful: I've never seen a black cab with a child seat - I suspect there are none. Two of the standard seats face backwards though so slightly safer. If you are going to use the Heathrow Express then taxi is the easiest option from Paddington. Uber is cheaper but still no child seats (and no rear-...


25

As suggested in comments there are three tariff levels in Sevilla but they apply for different sorts of journey as well as for different times. 1 is for urban, 2 for inter-urban and 3 for airport. https://teletaxisevilla.es/tarifas/ It is in Spanish I am afraid but perhaps on-line translation tools may help here.


24

This will likely depend on the specific regulations in force in Bangkok at the time, and possibly the model of taximeter installed1. However, for the one model of taximeter I could find an operations guide for it was clear that the operator had an option to Pause the meter (from which he could press Pause again to resume the trip), but once Pay was selected ...


23

I always do it if I think the route is not optimal. You are paying the bill after all!


21

In situations like this I never pay, I simply leave, if they want trouble ok lets get the police involved, in most countries, the driver has a lot more to loose than a tourist who brings money into the country to spend. Moreover many countries do not want a bad reputation either with this type of things. But be VERY careful if you are not a seasoned ...


20

Other than a few general things, like making sure you have a fixed price before setting off, and that as a non-local you're unlikely to ever get a journey on the meter (which is used for locals in Bangalore at least), here's my experiences over a few trips. Firstly, location matters. If you're stood outside of a nice hotel, then expect prices to be jacked ...


20

My intuition as a Londoner was that this was absolutely fine, but then I had a moment of self-doubt and worried that maybe I'd been being rude in not talking much to cabbies all these years. So I sought out this ethnographic study of cab drivers: Inside the Mind of a Cabbie (RSA) and that has confirmed my impression that the time and space are basically ...


20

As a rule, taxis are fine in Bangkok, it's the tuk-tuks that really prey on clueless tourists. But there are four simple things you can do to reduce the odds of taxi problems: Rule 1, learn taxi colors. Yellow/green taxis (below) are owner-operated, and this group contains the vast majority of bad apples. All other cabs are company-operated and generally ...


19

Considerations: Dulles (like BWI) lies a considerable distance from the District; there are no "obvious" options because each involves a tradeoff of time or money. Only Reagan National (DCA) is truly convenient to the city. If you have a large party or many bags, a taxi may be worth the hassle. There is no place to store bags when using public ...


19

If your purpose is to get from Heathrow Airport to Stoke-on-Trent with as little hassle as possible, I would consider flying to Manchester and then take the direct bus from Manchester Airport to Stoke-on-Trent. British Airways operates about 8 flights a day from Heathrow to Manchester and there are seven daily buses from Manchester Airport to Stoke-on-...


19

If you haven't already, do consider public transport options which are very good and start much cheaper. If you take Heathrow Express then the tube, it's likely to be a little faster than a taxi; if you take the Piccadilly Line, as well as being very cheap, you don't need to change trains so it's still quite convenient (and might even be faster than a taxi ...


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