40

As for question 2, Canada says that "it is the individual's responsibility to establish that such items were initially taken out of Canada and were not acquired abroad." In short, they can suspect that your goods were purchased outside of Canada, and it's your responsibility to demonstrate otherwise. In your case, I can imagine the customs officer saw a ...


32

The EU has banned all imports of whale products since 1982. Penalties can include imprisonment and large fines. Poland explicitly prohibits import by travellers of products of CITES species (no exceptions) References Do not bring whale meat home from Iceland The European Union and Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora CITES


26

The absolute maximum personal exemption for US customs is 1600 USD, per comments you're likely at the $800 level coming from the Philipines. The value of your coffee appears to exceed both levels. You'll need to declare it regardless of value. You will also probably have to pay duty on it as the value of 200 boxes appears to exceed even the maximum limit. ...


21

There are several tell-tale signs (condition, packaging, receipts, having several identical items, having things you would not typically need on a trip abroad) that might suggest an item has been bought during a trip. Beyond that, I guess customs officers follow (unpublished) guidelines or use their own judgment but they do in any case have a lot of ...


18

You need to check the ingredient list very carefully. Some dieting products contain amphetamines or similar compounds that are restricted in the USA. Trying to import such products could get you in serious trouble. And even if they're legal, you will have to pay import duties on them, since 200 boxes is well above any 'personal use'.


16

No. Declaring an item simply means telling the customs authorities that you have it. Whether or not you have to pay duty will depend on the particular laws of that country and the situation. For example, I purchased some cake at Demel in Vienna and brought it to the United States. I declared it to customs, because it is food, and the United States requires ...


16

Regardless of whether you can, don't. There is no sense in carrying questionable things in large quantities on your person when you will be going through the scrutiny of immigration and customs. Send them as a parcel by post or other shipping service where they'll be subject to minimal or no scrutiny and will not risk affecting your treatment at the border.


14

It's not enforced at all, and more importantly, it's not even applicable: as a tourist it's clear that you'll be exporting whatever you bring in, particularly if it's used. The regulations are there for professional importers, including people with undeclared suitcases full of identical, shrink-wrapped products. For what it's worth, I've traveled ...


12

Your case is quite simple: If the flight costs 500 Dollars, and shipping costs 400 dollars, then choose the latter option, as it saves you 100 dollars. For commercially imported goods, there is no duty free allowance anyway, so you end up paying the same amount of customs for both options. However, since you got these watches quite cheaply, be prepared to ...


11

To add the other answers (the one by Relaxed is spot-on - customs officers use their intuition), here comes some information about the legal situation, adapted to your case (Germany). Note that IANAL - so this is information is all only to the best of my knowledge. Legally, it is enough for the German Customs officers to suspect that something is imported ...


11

There is a EUR 430 allowance but it's explicitly for goods “having no commercial character”. So if you want to sell them, you're not OK, no matter their value. Incidentally, even a single brand new Apple Mac Book for your own use would not be OK either because it would be over the limit (bringing back your own used laptop is a different question). It was a ...


11

It would be handled in the country where the item is imported. That means the item has already been moved to your country by air, ship, train etc. It doesn't happen before your flight, it happens after your flight. So if you buy a refrigerator in Dubai and fly to Belgium, the Belgian customs will ask you to pay. Customs in Dubai doesn't care. You should ...


9

Customs usually wants to know the following things: Did you buy it while abroad? Is it coming TO this country, or THROUGH this country? Is it intended for resale? Is it worth their time? A new MacBook in a box brought back by a resident would satisfy 1-4. 2kg of baby wipes, opened, would stop at #3. A MacBook not in a box would probably pass as used and ...


9

I am not a lawyer, but from looking at the instructions to travelers by the Canadian Government, as well as from my personal experience, it seems that the following should work: You are allowed to bring items with you for your personal use when you enter Canada from the outside. This includes, for example, a laptop, or jewelry. Thus, you should not even ...


9

FYI, according to the information you can read in Carrying habushu (snake wine) from Japan to USA, it is not so easy to import alcohol with a snake to the U.S.: the main concern for bringing snake wine into the U.S. when a snake used in the wine that are endangered species, and therefore inadmissible. The wine would have to be inspected by an FWS ...


8

Just bring the receipt from the store and tell customs you have over-limit alcohol. A half-case won't be considered commercial. Duty is rather complicated and depends on the exact type of liquor and the alcohol content. Printing off the maker's webpage may help. As a very rough metric expect to pay about 20% tax.


8

As a general rule, cooked and/or pureed fruit is allowed into the US, however you WILL need to declare it. Failing to declare it, even if it is otherwise allowed, can carry a fine and given the quantity you're going to be carrying being caught is certainly a possibility. The quantity will not be relevant, unless customs believes that you are bringing in a "...


7

Exactly. If you're not leaving anything in the US, $0 is the value of the goods remaining the US (because there aren't any). If you aren't sure about something on the form, you can always ask the officers too.


7

Straight from the source: U.S. Customs and Border Protection Duty Free Exemptions If you are a U.S. resident returning from a foreign country with goods acquired abroad in your possession after a stay of 48-hours or more, you may be eligible for a personal duty-free exemption. If you are returning from Mexico, the 48-hour rule does not apply. The ...


7

Per Philippine customs regulations, returning contract workers who have been overseas for over 6 months can bring back "used personal effects up to value of PHP 10,000.-" duty free. Since this is only about US$200, it is highly likely that your jewelry is worth more than this, and you will need to pay large Customs duties and potentially also face ...


7

You are most certainly not banned from flying into Hamburg airport specifically; if anything, you are banned from entering Germany as a whole. However, the relevant law to determine an entry ban or a rejection, the Aufenthaltsgesetz (law concerning the presence in the Federal Republic, rough translation), names only one reason for an entry ban (assuming your ...


6

There are restrictions on importing left hand drive vehicles into New Zealand. It is unlikely that you would be able to purchase a new caravan overseas and successfully import it. From Importing a left-hand drive vehicle (Factsheet 12): Are there restrictions on LHD vehicles? Yes. Most left-hand drive vehicles have to be converted to right-hand drive ...


6

According to the Korea Customs Service website, prepared food for personal consumption is not included in the items that must be declared at customs upon arrival, provided that the total value of all items you are bringing in (and will not take back out with you) does not exceed the duty-free allowance of 400 USD. There are special weight/value restrictions ...


6

Yes, there is a difference, as stated by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau: Personal Importation of Beverage Alcohol Products ... A gift of beverage alcohol products connected with the solicitation of orders for (or the sale of) such products is considered to be for commercial use and may only be conducted by a federally licensed ...


6

You have basically three options: Buy a phone in Europe. If you can't find the one you want, buy a cheap one that will suit you until you return home, then buy the phone you really want. Consider re-selling the European phone on eBay back home to recuperate some of your cost. Buy the phone from the US, and pay import duties. If you're particular about the ...


6

As personal belongings, which are exempt from duties and declaration, you can have up to TWO cell phones per person (article 370 there). Declaration and formal duty and VAT payment in most cases make no sense as the same stuff will be cheaper (I suppose in most cases it should read as "much cheaper") in Ukraine. Having said that, I would not follow advice ...


6

https://travel.gc.ca/returning/customs/what-you-can-bring-home-to-canada You can pay by cash, travellers' cheque, Visa, American Express or MasterCard. The CBSA also accepts debit cards at most offices. Only Canadian dollars are valid currency in Canada. There is no reason to expect customs to expect other money. Deferred refers to the goods not ...


6

Usually you can't get "the exact same item" in the EU. An iPad sold under US law would have different warranty conditions than one sold under EU law, even if it is physically the same hardware. If you have an invoice/receipt and there is no reason to believe it is fraudulent, the receipt will determine the value. If it is well known that the same model ...


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