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207

In Bulgaria, Russia, former USSR countries and others, it's considered offensive not to drink when you've been invited to, and you might need a good solid excuse if you decide not to drink at all. Expect to be on the receiving end of some good-natured banter if you decide to abstain completely. Medical reasons are a possibility, although it will be ...


89

Just ask for "a beer". I don't think you'll find a completely universal approach that fits all cultures perfectly. However, in the continental beer cultures I'm the most familiar with (Dutch, German, Czech, Austrian, …), there's typically one dominant "size" of a beer that everyone gets. What exactly that means differs a lot by country or region. Asking for ...


71

You can definitely use your passport to prove your age. It's used by visitors all the time here in NZ, so it won't be unusual, and your bartender will certainly have seen a passport before.


69

Simply, no. If the traveler declares the alcohol, it will be seized as the traveler is not of age to import it. If the traveler does not declare the alcohol, and it is discovered, it will be seized as the traveler is not of age to import it, and will be penalized for smuggling undeclared goods into the United States. If the traveler is traveling with ...


65

There are 3 forms of accepted ID. An NZ drivers license, any current passport and a HANZ18+ card. You can find a form for an 18+ card here: https://www.alcohol.org.nz/alcohol-management-laws/nz-alcohol-laws/age-the-law/approved-id It costs $50 but could be a good idea if you're planning on being out often because taking your passport around with you while ...


63

I was in the unfortunate position of being insistingly encouraged to drink 3 years ago on the Trans-Siberian. I was much worse for wear after that experience, and sought out suggestions (in fact I really shouldn't have had that much considering my meds). Anyway, this year I returned. And indeed, the best way if you can't just refuse outright, is simply to ...


50

It's a law that's designed to reduce public drunkenness / alcoholism, especially at night when you don't want loud, rowdy and sometimes violent drunk people in the streets. Sometimes vendors try to circumvent these laws by selling e.g. a very expensive plastic cup that comes with a free can of beer when you buy it : ), but there have been crackdowns on such ...


47

The best source I can find is this picture gallery of the local newspaper (Süddeutsche Zeitung, in German). My advice is based on that, own experience and other sources where mentioned: You can bring your own food. (Within some limits, see below. Unless it is a "Wirtsgarten".) In case you bring food, you might want to think of napkins, cutlery, tablecloth, ...


45

As a Russian and non-drinker, I want to add some info about the culture of drinking in Russia. First of all: You don't have to drink vodka, even if your partners are. It is ok if you just say: I can't drink alcohol as strong as vodka, I need wine (or cocktails, or whatever you need). Ask women about this - they're more reliable in such situations. But if ...


41

I have never seen such an icon. The only way to know is to ask for it. Common sense is that in a lot of countries where alcohol is prohibited by religion or not really within the local culture, you won't find it in cooking. Now, in other countries where alcohol is strong in the local culture, it will be used in the cooking and will never be specified as it ...


33

Driving a car is the best excuse. The best solution is not hanging out with alcoholics who don't respect non-drinkers :-)


31

No, it's not true - but perhaps you misunderstood? Bars in Japan very commonly have a cover charge, typically in the 500-1000 yen range (per person), that could well explain the difference.


30

In general, it is illegal for an individual under 21 years of age to possess alcohol, whether open or sealed, in a public place in the United States. You would have to consult the laws of the state you are in, as well as any states you transit through, to see if this is the case for you specifically. A related matter is whether or not it is legal for an ...


29

I'm a Russian who doesn't drink vodka. If your goal is not to drink at all - just say so and be done with that. If you like to drink a little but just don't want to kill your liver - tell them that you prefer cognac or whiskey (whichever you like the best). Wine will also work but probably raise a couple of "be a man" things. The goal is to have a drink ...


29

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


27

It is indeed possible in theory, and VERY difficult in practice. You need to start, traditionally, at Elephant and Castle at 10am. Going at about 20-30 min per pub you will just finish before closing in Central London. It's hard, really hard, and you need someone to keep tabs on the time and keep everyone moving. There's a webpage with strategies, maps ...


26

It varies a lot, largely depending on where you travel to. I have definitely seen some menus with alcohol symbols next to some dishes to indicate that they're cooked with e.g. red wine. Most of these I have seen in France, a country with a long alcohol tradition but also a large Muslim population. However, it is still not the norm, and most places you must ...


25

I'm French and I didn't know about this law, nor can I find any mention of it in a casual search. This site with teaching material for the restaurant business claims the contrary: Can we make a customer pay a supplement if he wishes to bring his own bottles? Yes, it is possible to charge a “corkage fee” if the customer wants to be served his own bottles....


25

Rules regarding alcohol production, sales and consumption are governed by Federal law N 171-ФЗ. Chapter II article 16 paragraph 5 says: Не допускается розничная продажа алкогольной продукции с 23 часов до 8 часов по местному времени, за исключением розничной продажи алкогольной продукции, осуществляемой организациями [...] услуг общественного питания, ...


23

Non-English speaking countries will vary in their standard terminology and standard serving size. For example within Germany, it might be anything from 0.2L (standard for "Kölsch"), 0.3L (standard for "Pils"), 0.5L ("Halbes") to 1L ("Mass") (source 1). In France "une bière" is likely to be 250ml or 330ml (source 2). Asking for "a pint" definitely marks ...


20

You need to drink same number of portions. But not same volume. This is major point! You can ask for half or quarter of portion. This is not break the rite. (In very difficult cases you need to drink 3 first full portion and then you can ask for half.)


18

Use the same excuse, medical reasons. You can say if you drink a little more, will really harm your medication, and you didn't mentioned before to not be rude. I think that's a nice way. Your idea!


18

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ driver'...


18

Declare it, but don't volunteer more information than you need to. The most likely consequence: "What are you declaring?" "This bottle of Polish vodka." "That's fine, have a nice day. Next!" Worse case, some eagle-eyed officer knows Zubrowka is not allowed and confiscates it, but it's highly unlikely there would be any penalties beyond that. In either ...


17

I haven't been in this position in Russia but I have been in Romania and Serbia just recently. Nobody seemed to mind when I ordered lots of glasses of water while I was drinking. I had an excuse for being dehydrated (once from being on the beach all day and once for having hitchhiked a long way). I didn't refuse drinks but I had as many waters as ţuicăs, ...


17

I would suggest you look for another solution. Deal with the root cause instead and go on a fear-of-flying course. In the UK, where Vass is, both Virgin and British Airways run regular one-day courses at major airports, which include a short flight. I went on the BA one some years ago and it was certainly money well spent as far as I am concerned; I'd ...


16

It's normally the driver's duty to bring the "éthylotest" (or "alcootest"), but some renting companies are providing one or two. Otherwise it costs 2 € in shop / pharmacy. Links (in french) for companies saying they provide it (in brackets, price you pay if you used it): Avis (? €), Budget (? €), Europcar (6 €), Hertz (5 €), Sixt (5 €). Always ask to be ...


16

As far as UAE is concerned, there is only one issue at hand - since you are not going to consume alcohol inside the UAE but on-board the aircraft; where they do not check your religion. If you appear publicly intoxicated, you are breaking the law. That's it. So, as long as you can "hold your liquor", you'll be fine. The problem is that "intoxicated" is ...


16

Note: I am Italian, and travelled my homeland peninsula from north to south, and from west to east. Sorry to contradict some of the previous answers, but no, aperitivo/apericena are not limited to the Milan area. Maybe it started as a cultural movement in the north of Italy, but I can assure you that nowadays (well, it is since I can remember - that would ...


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