Hot answers tagged

90

Just ask for "a beer". I don't think you'll find a completely universal approach that fits all cultures perfectly. However, in the continental beer cultures I'm the most familiar with (Dutch, German, Czech, Austrian, …), there's typically one dominant "size" of a beer that everyone gets. What exactly that means differs a lot by country or region. Asking for ...


71

You can definitely use your passport to prove your age. It's used by visitors all the time here in NZ, so it won't be unusual, and your bartender will certainly have seen a passport before.


68

Simply, no. If the traveler declares the alcohol, it will be seized as the traveler is not of age to import it. If the traveler does not declare the alcohol, and it is discovered, it will be seized as the traveler is not of age to import it, and will be penalized for smuggling undeclared goods into the United States. If the traveler is traveling with ...


65

There are 3 forms of accepted ID. An NZ drivers license, any current passport and a HANZ18+ card. You can find a form for an 18+ card here: https://www.alcohol.org.nz/alcohol-management-laws/nz-alcohol-laws/age-the-law/approved-id It costs $50 but could be a good idea if you're planning on being out often because taking your passport around with you while ...


49

It's a law that's designed to reduce public drunkenness / alcoholism, especially at night when you don't want loud, rowdy and sometimes violent drunk people in the streets. Sometimes vendors try to circumvent these laws by selling e.g. a very expensive plastic cup that comes with a free can of beer when you buy it : ), but there have been crackdowns on such ...


47

The best source I can find is this picture gallery of the local newspaper (Süddeutsche Zeitung, in German). My advice is based on that, own experience and other sources where mentioned: You can bring your own food. (Within some limits, see below. Unless it is a "Wirtsgarten".) In case you bring food, you might want to think of napkins, cutlery, tablecloth, ...


40

I have never seen such an icon. The only way to know is to ask for it. Common sense is that in a lot of countries where alcohol is prohibited by religion or not really within the local culture, you won't find it in cooking. Now, in other countries where alcohol is strong in the local culture, it will be used in the cooking and will never be specified as it ...


36

The laws on alcohol purchase in an airport are set by the country the airport is in, and are almost always the same as purchasing outside the airport. I haven't researched the specific case of Malta, but I would expect you would be OK. Note that countries also have laws about how old you need to be to import alcohol. In your case you will be OK, as the ...


31

No, it's not true - but perhaps you misunderstood? Bars in Japan very commonly have a cover charge, typically in the 500-1000 yen range (per person), that could well explain the difference.


30

In general, it is illegal for an individual under 21 years of age to possess alcohol, whether open or sealed, in a public place in the United States. You would have to consult the laws of the state you are in, as well as any states you transit through, to see if this is the case for you specifically. A related matter is whether or not it is legal for an ...


29

There is no nationally, or even locally mandated standard. I've certainly seen friends have no issues using both Passports and Drivers Licenses from their home country. I've also seen people have issues - especially when their ID is written in a non-latin script, or when they have a DOB which can be misread by using a non-American date ordering scheme, (i.e. ...


27

This depends on a number of factors. Firstly there is the physical aspect - can you physically access the lounge? Lounges are generally in the 'departure' area of the airport, which is often only accessible by departing passengers - at least for international arrivals, but even sometimes for domestic arrivals. If you can't physically access the lounge ...


26

It varies a lot, largely depending on where you travel to. I have definitely seen some menus with alcohol symbols next to some dishes to indicate that they're cooked with e.g. red wine. Most of these I have seen in France, a country with a long alcohol tradition but also a large Muslim population. However, it is still not the norm, and most places you must ...


25

I'm French and I didn't know about this law, nor can I find any mention of it in a casual search. This site with teaching material for the restaurant business claims the contrary: Can we make a customer pay a supplement if he wishes to bring his own bottles? Yes, it is possible to charge a “corkage fee” if the customer wants to be served his own bottles....


25

Rules regarding alcohol production, sales and consumption are governed by Federal law N 171-ФЗ. Chapter II article 16 paragraph 5 says: Не допускается розничная продажа алкогольной продукции с 23 часов до 8 часов по местному времени, за исключением розничной продажи алкогольной продукции, осуществляемой организациями [...] услуг общественного питания, ...


22

Declare it, but don't volunteer more information than you need to. The most likely consequence: "What are you declaring?" "This bottle of Polish vodka." "That's fine, have a nice day. Next!" Worst case, some eagle-eyed officer knows Zubrowka is not allowed and confiscates it, but it's highly unlikely there would be any penalties beyond that. In either ...


22

Non-English speaking countries will vary in their standard terminology and standard serving size. For example within Germany, it might be anything from 0.2L (standard for "Kölsch"), 0.3L (standard for "Pils"), 0.5L ("Halbes") to 1L ("Mass") (source 1). In France "une bière" is likely to be 250ml or 330ml (source 2). Asking for "a pint" definitely marks ...


19

This Passenger Customs Guide https://www.dubaicustoms.gov.ae/en/eServices/ServicesForTravellers/Documents/TravelersGuide09En.pdf states: “... the following items are exempted from customs duties and shall be allowed entry: a. Gifts whose value does not exceed AED 3000. b. A total number of 400 cigarettes, or 50 cigars, or 500 grams of tobacco (minced or ...


18

Generally bars have always asked me for my passport in the US. It's frustrating as you'd rather not take your passport out to town, but when I've tried to take my driver's license as ID, I've either been turned away, or had to really ask nicely and still get told to bring my passport next time. In New Zealand, they're as strict - you either show a NZ driver'...


17

No, the UK is in the transition period of brexit where nothing has changed in that regard. This is currently due to end on 31st December 2020.


16

As far as UAE is concerned, there is only one issue at hand - since you are not going to consume alcohol inside the UAE but on-board the aircraft; where they do not check your religion. If you appear publicly intoxicated, you are breaking the law. That's it. So, as long as you can "hold your liquor", you'll be fine. The problem is that "intoxicated" is ...


16

Note: I am Italian, and travelled my homeland peninsula from north to south, and from west to east. Sorry to contradict some of the previous answers, but no, aperitivo/apericena are not limited to the Milan area. Maybe it started as a cultural movement in the north of Italy, but I can assure you that nowadays (well, it is since I can remember - that would ...


16

To have map services like Google Maps find actual breweries correctly, you have to search micro brasserie. That filters out the brasseries, which are primarily restaurants, as @phoog mentioned in his comment. Searching micro brasserie found the exact types of establishments I was looking for - places that make and sell their own beer!


15

It depends primarily on the airline policy. The only airline I believe is Royal Brunei Airlines which allows consumption of personal alcohol on-board because it does not serve any on the aircraft. Any airline which serves alcohol on-board typically does not allow consumption of personal alcohol. I suspect the reason for this is to maintain decorum during ...


15

The meals are labeled for a reason. Peanuts, milk, regular grains are labeled because of allergic (posible lethal) reactions of some people. Raw meat is labeled because of possible health issues. Some people may have problems with digesting unprocessed meat or they are supersuspicious of salmonela. Meat, eggs, vegetarian, vegan are labeled because some ...


15

Alcohol is not a federal issue, it's a state issue. So, the TSA is legally completely unconcerned with the presence of a bottle of booze in your luggage. When the TSA searches your luggage, they are concerned with security, not state alcohol regulations. They will not know how old you are. Yea, that's in your traveller data, but they are not going to look at ...


15

If you in Germany ride a bicycle under influence of alcohol and your blood alcohol content is above 0.16% or the police deem you incapable of riding the bicycle without endangering others, the consequences are basically the same as if you had been driving a motorized vehicle. It is of no relevance that you were only riding 50-60m or that it was not your ...


14

The import laws cited on the the page of Norway's Toll Office do not distinguish between the manner the alcohol has been created (because that would likely be rather difficult); only by the strength. You're allowed for free (see the link for how much you have to pay if you need to import larger quantities): One litre of an alcoholic beverage containing more ...


14

It depends on which US state she is returning to and yes, she may get in trouble. There are US states at the Canadian border not only prohibiting sales, purchase, possession or consumption of alcohol to or by underage persons, but also strictly prohibiting the state of actually being intoxicated, e.g. Idaho, Michigan and New Hampshire. Other states have ...


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