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24

This excellent answer by @Calchas, while for a different route on AF/KLM, happens to have the answer for your route as well - for whatever reason, they don't allow origin open jaws where the origins are in different countries. I looked up Air France's fare rules for a first class flight from CDG-KIX, and they include the following (among many other rules). ...


21

They are simply advertising, just the same as an airline may paint the logo of a sports team on an aircraft, or name it after a city. There is no other difference whatsoever, either in facilities or services, compared to the rest of the airline's fleet. There are several different Star Alliance livery schemes around, as a common design was not published ...


20

To be able to book a combination of flights, the airline has to publish a fare which allows this combination. If that didn't happen, then it can be the case like you have noticed, that you could book two flights separately as one-ways, but not together as open-jaw or return. As long as the airline doesn't add a fare for the combination, there is nothing you ...


16

Flying Blue is the airline loyalty programme of Air France, KLM, Air Europa, Kenya Airways, Aircalin, and TAROM. The intention of the programme is to encourage you to spend more money with these airlines [instead of with their competitors], in exchange for certain benefits. SkyTeam is an airline alliance that includes all of the airlines above, plus several ...


13

When you purchase an airline ticket for a flight there are up to 3 airlines involved for each leg of the flight : 1. The "operating" carrier - this is the airline that is actually operating the flight 2. The "marketing" carrier - this is the airline of the flight number that you purchased. 3. The "ticketing" carrier - this is the airline that you actually ...


9

You always check in with the carrier operating your first segment. You'll need to give the flight numbers to be certain, but it sounds like it will be Delta. If you are transitting through AMS you should go through customs and immigration in CWL. On the return, it sounds like you will be on KLM Cityhopper and will therefore check-in at the KLM desk. ...


9

Generally if you flew with an airline, and you have points with them or their alliance, whoever you hold the points with, you can credit. So I had an itinerary last year that involved some major US Airline (Delta?) and then Alaska Airlines. It's possible to credit Alaska Airlines to One World alliance airlines, and I'm with Qantas. So when I'd done the ...


8

As far as I know, Skyteam has the same rules as pretty much every other airline or alliance: the miles for each ticket go to the person who actually uses that ticket to fly, provided they are registered in the program. It makes no difference who paid. In your example, let's say the trip is 1000 miles long. No matter who pays, if you both register, and you ...


7

For Flying Blue you will earn level miles and award miles, and the flight will count as a qualifying flight, but only if your flight is not booked into the Z, Q or G booking codes. https://www.flyingblue.com/earn-and-spend-miles/airlines/partner/180/china-eastern.html The usual exceptions apply. As a frequent flier, your usual SkyPriority benefits will ...


6

In this instance, it was possible. The checkin staff at NRT took some time to try and make it work; their systems didn't want to let them put in the details for the final leg, and they said I would need to visit a transfer desk at AMS to provide the details to KLM. However, the staff at AMS said all the details were already there, so I don't know who was ...


6

The definitive guide on where you can credit miles to and how much you will earn is on wheretocredit. From that, you can see the earning rates on Flying Blue and Aeroflot. Where to Credit provides mileage earning calculations for frequent flyer programs around the world. The site is not affiliated with airlines (nor do I have any connection to it) and the ...


4

Nope. Your contract is with the marketing carrier not with the entire alliance. You could try buying the tickets as a code share from Delta, KLM or Air France (if they offer it). If Alitalia goes belly up, the marketing carrier would still be responsible for getting you there. It's risky though: you should study the contract of carriage for details and ...


2

While user3761894's answer is unfortunately correct that AF will not issue such a ticket, there is one way around this that should be much cheaper than booking as two separate one-way flights: Book a round-trip from CDG to KIX and then book a separate one-way flight to LHR on a new reservation. The downside to this option is that, with it not being booked ...


2

Operating answer: Flying Blue:** Ref.:FLB1845830213 Dear Mr **, Thank you for your message of 03 September 2018. You have contacted us regarding the Miles and XP accrual for your upcoming flights in December. Upon the careful check of your reservation ####, I am pleased to confirm that indeed the flights are eligible for the Miles and XP accrual. You ...


2

So, the rule as stated here is that you earn miles and XP for flights marketed by Air France (and other Flying Blue airlines), even if they are operated by other airlines. This is also stated here and here in the most recent announcement about the Air France / Qantas codeshare agreement. I asked the question to Flying Blue, and they just called back to let ...


2

Is the alliance responsible for tickets of bankrupt airline? NO. But they are be responsible for your transportation if you buy the same flights, code share or not, from a different carrier and they are issued on stock other than 055 (the first three letters of the ticket number). However, you probably won't get the same deal doing it that way.


2

No, you can't. Any flight you book with miles does not give you miles, they are always excluded.


2

SkyTeam is an alliance of airlines; members cooperate to make it easier for passengers to fly with other alliance members, for example by codesharing, checking baggage through to one's final destination, and so on. SkyPriority is the label for a group of benefits such as priority check-in and boarding awarded to passengers who are members of alliance ...


2

Some airlines run a separate scheme where the payer can also earn some kind of credit towards future flights. This is typically aimed at small businesses. But the usual rules are that the passenger, not the purchaser earns. The reason is very simple, to drive repeat business from the passenger, both in his personal capacity and in his ability to influence ...


2

There are several reasons for the "flyer earns" general rule. Consider some scenarios if "payer earns" would happen: I'm a frequent traveler so I put an ad on Craigslist where I offer X% off your ticket if I book it (and you PayPal me the rest). I pocketed the miles which to an infrequent traveler is practically useless anyways. I am a big company and I am ...


2

Usually it works fine. It is a long travel, so you may not be able to check in at the initial airport. You need to keep your baggage receipt ready when you check in again in the second airport (transfer check-in or sometime only on normal check-in counter). Probably they require them to put also on the company computers (it was so in my experience, in the ...


1

for Chandigarh to Delhi, use Air India. They provide 25kg checkin free. If you go early for check in they can allow 2 bags within 25kg (although tkt says one bag). Forgot to add, it's economy. You don't have to book business class.


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